Question

Increasing maximum file handling?

  • 5 June 2016
  • 9 replies
  • 840 views

The Music folder on my hard drive at home contains 112,000 mp3 files, mostly consisting of ripped CD tracks, and all legally purchased. I have Sono installed on my home system but in order to use my library I have had to upload filed to Amazon Music and access that through my Sonos system. Not only is thiis a pain, but sound quality is compromised.
iTunes handles my whole library no problem. Is Sonos ever going to be upgraded so it will handle my entire library?

Dean

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9 replies

Userlevel 7
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There has never been any inkling that this would happen. Given the fact that the number of people who have legally purchased libraries with more than 65,000 is vanishingly small AND that Sonos has recently said they will concentrate on streaming services and voice control you can safely assume they won't ever change the hardware to allow this.

There are workarounds - I suggest you try and search for them on this forum.
There has never been any inkling that this would happen. Given the fact that the number of people who have legally purchased libraries with more than 65,000 is vanishingly small AND that Sonos has recently said they will concentrate on streaming services and voice control you can safely assume they won't ever change the hardware to allow this.

There are workarounds - I suggest you try and search for them on this forum.
The number of people with large libraries is not going to vanish, its going to get bigger as large CD collections are digitized. The trend toward streaming services, which have bad sound quality, is being spearheaded by record companies and outfits like Apple, who want to sell music by the song and make sure that they can charge for the same songs by the month, forever. Apple even went so far as to fix Apple Music so that it deletes files from local hard drives of Apple Music subscribers. The idea that someone owns the digits is poison to them.

When the change was made to CD from LP, we worried that a lot of rare material would be unavailable. As it turned out, the opposite happened. So far, streaming services have not gone the same direction, and we may lose a lot of material altogether. We'll see.

If you know about a workaround, why not tell me or point me to it? I doubt you do.

"Change the hardware?" I seriously doubt that this is a hardware issue. If you know what you're talking about, I'd love to hear that one explained.
Ok, the limit is due to memory constraints in the older hardware, they simply can't store anything more in their nvram and as Sonos resolutely refuse to obsolete any playback device they can't increase the limit without doing something very radical. Given it appears they're laying off the team responsible for local library development it doesn't appear anything radical will ever appear.

Secondly streaming services are tending to increase their bitrates and therefore their quality all the time, there are already a number of lossless streaming services, that will only increase.

Thirdly the percentage of Sonos users who ONLY use streaming services is now well in excess of 80% according to Sonos' own figures (and clearly they're only going to care about their own user base), people (ie the general public, not you) aren't digitizing their collections at all, they're just listening online, so you're wrong there as well.

Lastly, one popular workaround is Subsonic. There are a number of people here that swear by it. There, I think that's covered everything.
1) Your marketing analysis does not match reality. Sonos has stated that the number of people streaming far outnumbers those with a local library, and the number of local libraries is decreasing, not increasing.

2) There are several workarounds, including albums as playlists, dividing libraries, and various servers. None are fully satisfactory. Listing them all would be pointless. Do a search on the threads and you will find them.

3) It is 100% a hardware issue. The music index is held in memory, and memory is limited. Unless you know what you are talking about, I suggest you wind yourself back a bit. There are more than a few folks who know this stuff inside and out, and they will take you to school on it unless you chill with the attitude.

This topic comes up all the time, and your types of posts are nothing new. As such, these questions have been answered hundreds of times, and most longtime posters know the real answers by heart. So I suggest you read the old threads and get informed yourself before asking for proof of other posters knowledge.
Thanks to L HC.

Rockstar jgatie knows where to put his attitude. Maybe under his bed in his parent's basement.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
The number of people with large libraries is not going to vanish, its going to get bigger as large CD collections are digitized. The trend toward streaming services, which have bad sound quality, is being spearheaded by record companies and outfits like Apple, who want to sell music by the song and make sure that they can charge for the same songs by the month, forever. Apple even went so far as to fix Apple Music so that it deletes files from local hard drives of Apple Music subscribers. The idea that someone owns the digits is poison to them.

When the change was made to CD from LP, we worried that a lot of rare material would be unavailable. As it turned out, the opposite happened. So far, streaming services have not gone the same direction, and we may lose a lot of material altogether. We'll see.

If you know about a workaround, why not tell me or point me to it? I doubt you do.

"Change the hardware?" I seriously doubt that this is a hardware issue. If you know what you're talking about, I'd love to hear that one explained.


To be fair you asked the question "Is Sonos ever going to be upgraded so it will handle my entire library?" - I think I pretty much answered that question. There really isn't any point in beating around the bush and giving you false hope. As the others point out this question has arisen on a number of occasions and for quite a number of years - As I understand it from reading previous threads there was an increase that Sonos were able to achieve within the confines of the hardware but they are now at a limit.
Thanks to L HC.

Rockstar jgatie knows where to put his attitude. Maybe under his bed in his parent's basement.


That would be difficult to do. My parents are dead. Nice try, though. 🙂
Limit defeated: I got around the 65,000 by subscribing to Amazon Music storage. They limit you to 250,000 tracks and costs around $22/year. I connected the SONOS to Amazon music and I have access to all tracks. WORD OF WARNING: The interface that amazon supplies is very lacking. It took me two 2 weeks to load 110,000 tracks, you might need to uninstall and reload the app many times before getting the settings correct (20GIG, 1 track at a time).