Question

How would I go about using a Sonos system to play CD's through my existing CD player?

  • 19 November 2013
  • 8 replies
  • 39416 views

I'm thinking about buying a Sonos system, but I would like to continue to play individual CDs in addition to streaming music from my computer. How would I do that? Thanks.

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8 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +26
Hello Brenk,

All of our Sonos players can play the music library stored on the computer there. You'll just setup a network share and any of the Sonos components will be able to play that music. Along with that, the PLAY:5, CONNECT, and CONNECT:AMP units have a Line-In port which you can use to play audio directly from a third party device, such as your existing CD Player. You can find more information on our Line-In here.

Cheers.
If using a PLAY:5 to connect your existing CD player, via the line-in port, is it as simple as inserting the CD and pressing the play button on the CD player and the sound will automatically come out of the PLAY:5 or would you still have to use a Sonos controller app to select the speaker/room?
Userlevel 7
Badge +26
If using a PLAY:5 to connect your existing CD player, via the line-in port, is it as simple as inserting the CD and pressing the play button on the CD player and the sound will automatically come out of the PLAY:5 or would you still have to use a Sonos controller app to select the speaker/room?
You need to tell that PLAY:5 to automatically play the Line-In when it's detected first. That can be done within the settings for that unit: Settings > Room Settings > PLAY:5 > Line-In.

Turn on Autoplay Line In and you can even select the room you want the unit to play to, as you could have that Line-In automatically play in a different room if you wanted. Once you've got that setup, the line-in will always behave that way until told differently.

Note, that if you have autoplay turned on and your PLAY:5 is playing music, when the line in is detected it will stop play what it was and will switch to the line-in.

Thanks

Note, that if you have autoplay turned on and your PLAY:5 is playing music, when the line in is detected it will stop play what it was and will switch to the line-in.


If I connect a CD to Line-in on a PLAY:5, can I stream that CD to a different room with two PLAY:1, and stream a totally different content on the PLAY:5 at sam time? so the PLAY:5 is used as player, input device and stream source at same time?
Yeah you can do that.
Userlevel 2
Badge
Was thinking about this today and wanted some clarification: a CD player talks digital data and converts it into analogue audio, you then take this audio signal, connect it to the line-in on a SONOS speaker. Now does the speaker then convert this analog signal BACK into digital to play it and stream to the other speakers in the same group. This digital -> analog -> digital process sounds very redundant. Is my understanding incorrect ?
Userlevel 7
Badge +22
no its not redundant its just that most Sonos units don't have a digital input and therefore you can't keep it all digital.

That is not the case with Playbar. If you output from CD player via optical cable to a Playbar it would be pure digital with no conversion.

Although how noticeable the conversion process is - that is debatable on whether or not you will hear the difference.

But when it comes down to it - the best way to keep all digital is to rip those CD's from the CD's to digital files and then play those directly from your harddrive to Sonos.

The age of CD is long gone. If your still using CDs I highly recommend you do as I did and rip them all (I would pick FLAC lossless) and put all those CD's away in a storage box never to be seen again. It takes some time but it is well worth it.
Not to mention the FLAC rips should theoretically sound better. A CD player has to do real time error correction, which in layman's terms means "if the data is flawed, guess at what it was supposed to be". Streaming from a track is not real time and enough of a buffer is built up as the track streams so that if a packet is found to be incorrect, the packet is simply re-requested and put back in the buffer.

Now would you be able to hear the difference? Most certainly not (not even you "trained ear" folks). However, it does cause one to chuckle when an "audiophile" brags about how much better their $10,000 "transport" (aka fancy pants CD player) is when compared to a Sonos Connect.