Hi-Resolution Audio and Sonos



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First year electronics engineering textbook, where they talk about sampling and what it is.


Then why does the person who founded the organization which produces the #1 high resolution audio codec, a man with Engineering degrees from MIT and Tokyo Tech, say differently? Certainly his education extends far beyond your first year engineering textbook?

As we try to point out, your Line-In experience is not relevant.

Streaming of HD files (or any other type for that matter) on Sonos would be akin to the way your Firestick works. 

Right, so you are saying that grouped wireless play of HD files will work as flawlessly as my Firestick does HD TV. 

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For all the people who have quoted Nyquist–Shannon, here is my complete and full statement on why Nyquist–Shannon actually proves that high-res audio works, and Nyquist–Shannon can also be used to prove that CD resolution does not fully and accurately reproduce the original audio analog signal:

https://link.medium.com/7uvbTpCcqX

I have read all the articles I could find, and seen all the videos I could see, and none of them tell the real truth and the full truth without hiding one critical aspect or the other. This article, covers the whole subject in simple terms and I will add more detail as and when I find it.

Mathematics cannot be refuted. Opinions can.
Mathematics is precise in the meaning of what something actually means.
No comment, if this argument floats your boat.
Thank you all for responses. Are they truncating the 24bit to 16bit as a way to reduce network overhead?
The way I look at, the idea that there is an objective measure of sound quality in general is somewhat misleading. While there are absolutely are characteristics of sound that tend to be more pleasing to the ear than others, reproducing music that sounds closer to the original doesn't necessarily translate to more pleasurable listening experience. There's the obvious factors such as how reflective walls, furniture, etc are, environmental factors.

Of course, there is the your personal preference for choice in music. I'd also say there are other factors that have little to do with the audio itself. There is your own personal mood that's going to effect your enjoyment of the music. And then there is also a factor of who else is listening as well, and their mood. I can certainly say that I've had a better experience listening to music off a cheap bluetooth speaker with good friends than a high end system all by myself when I'm in a bad mood.

There is also the sense of familiarity of a sound that can bring comfort and improve the experience. I personally tend to prefer recording over live music because it's not quite the same repeatable experience. Then the opposite is trued in that an unfamiliar sound can be pleasurable as well. There are time when I enjoy audio coming from an echo dot over Sonos just because it's going to be slightly different than the sound my ears have grown accustomed to.

I would argue too that the price you pay for a sound system, or the effort you put into researching and putting it together, could psychological improve your enjoyment of the music. It brings a sense of achievement to the experience. Likewise, ease of use of getting to the experience ads value. it's why LPs faded out of popularity in favor of CDs, to digital music, to voice controlled music.

So to me, I don't really care if there is better sound quality beyond Sonos out there. Pursuing that will have such a marginal impact on the overall experience, compared to addressing other areas the effect the experience.
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https://support.sonos.com/s/article/79?language=en_US
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ratty's explanation is much more likely than mine. My audio hardware knowledge is decades out of date...
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And some people blindly believe what the books say without trying out themselves.

I used to believe the books too. Until I tried it out myself to see if high res made any difference and sure thing it does.

I an an electronics engineer myself. The way digital music is stored, it does not capture all the information. There is definitely loss based on sampling rate. This I learnt at college.

Some say you can’t make out the difference. But so many people can make out some difference. I think you just have to hear it out yourself and figure out whether you can.

I come with no bias. I heard it myself and made the determination that I can hear better at high-res. My own music, I play back at high-res only because otherwise it loses a lot of the “warmth” = mid & low frequencies. I can only make out the difference in that. Everything else feels the same between CD quality and high-res.

I have come to that conclusion, that hires audio is important in production and mixing - when the final result is to be sent to the listener 16-bit/48kHz i perfectly enough IF the encoding is done right - aparently many MP3 etc encoders are of very poor quality and produces the bad audio that we experience. SO either use 16bit/48kHz lossless OR use a quality encoder (when using a music provider like Google) you are at their mercy...

Good info here. So it should handle Red Book CD just fine correct? Apple Lossless? Thanks!
my One and Play 1 have never been able to play 24bit files (flac or mqa or any other 24bit file. I can only play 24bit in a thumb drive into the receiver, mqa tidal via HDMI via Mac, and recently tidal iOS through Airplay. Playing the same mqa through Sonos downgrades to 16 bit. My understanding is that it is hardware restricted( at least first and second gen)
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That is so bad my brain is trying to escape out my left ear.
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I'm guessing the same reason folks buy $500 6' speaker cables and $200 1 M TOS cables?
Before the internet, I learnt this saying: Paper does not refuse ink - to convey that just because something is in print, does not mean it is true.

Another great blog post by Mark Waldrep, an expert on HD-Audio in the studio, where it actually matters.

http://www.realhd-audio.com/?p=6664

 

A follow-up post:

http://www.realhd-audio.com/?p=6725

Good grief. At the outset I warned "before you get in any deeper...". I fear the OP may have sunk.
I would argue too that the price you pay for a sound system, or the effort you put into researching and putting it together, could psychological improve your enjoyment of the music.
I agree. Another example are the looks of things like speakers, which have no measurable impact, but can enhance the experience of the sound they deliver.
But these are subjective things, and I would not expect another to react the way I do to these, nor claim any superior hearing ability.
And of course, to say once again: my number one tweak to enhance sound quality is a glass or two of wine or whisky and the lights down low. I have yet to see that one improved upon.
First year electronics engineering textbook, where they talk about sampling and what it is.

I'm sorry, but I have to come back to this. As ratty has stated, audio sampling consists of some pretty advanced mathematical concepts, including Nyquist-Shannon and Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis utilizes Fourier transformation, which involves linear algebra. Since linear algebra is not taught to freshman, how exactly were you studying sampling theory in your "first year engineering textbook"?

In other words, something is odoriferous in Odense.

I would argue too that the price you pay for a sound system, or the effort you put into researching and putting it together, could psychological improve your enjoyment of the music.And of course, to say once again: my number one tweak to enhance sound quality is a glass or two of wine or whisky and the lights down low. I have yet to see that one improved upon.


In my house, if the music is doing it's job, something resembling dancing may occur. Unfortunately, the dog tends to interpret this as 'play time'. Therefore, a factor in improving the sound quality, from a subjective view, is that the dog is currently busy someplace else.
How embarrassing. Like a full on car wreck put out in words.

In my house, if the music is doing it's job, something resembling dancing may occur.


Sounds like my daily aerobic workout.

“Alexa, play some upbeat Latin Jazz!” The feet cannot keep still.

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