Hi Res lossless 24bit 192khz to sonos five via Line in jackplug

  • 16 March 2022
  • 32 replies
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I would like to know if this is a good solution to play hi res files (24bit 192khz) on a sonos five stereo system.

As far as I know and read in div. threads in this forum it is not possible to stream Apple Hi-Res lossless via the Sonos app (only AAC 256).  Amazon Music Ultra HD or Quobuz/ Tidal is limited to 24bit 48khz.

Streaming from Apple Devices via Airplay is also limited to lossless (16bit 44khz).

That's why I thought about the following:

Usage of my Apple Devices (Mac or iPad) via DAC (e.g Topping DS 50 or FIIO) connect via USB and then use line in to Sonos five. I can see (via a borrowed RME ADI2 ) that I receive 24bit 192khz from my Apple devices.

My question now is: is the SONOS five directly using this stream without any further conversions, or does it convert the stream, when it is played locally via the wired connection described above (Mac-USB-DAC-jack plug -Line in Sonos five)?

Anyone using this solution already? How does it sound?

Thanks a lot,

regards tomyc


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32 replies

I’d be fascinated to read of any controlled evaluation which conclusively proves that listeners can consistently differentiate hi-res from Red Book, given a common (hi-res) source recording. On the contrary there are tests which demonstrate precisely the opposite.

Higher sampling rates and bit depths obviously have their place in the production chain, to avoid errors and filter effects, but are unnecessary as a final delivery format.

Streaming providers are doing hi-res because that’s what consumers think they want, because marketing has convinced them so and, well, bigger must be better right?

Any “immense difference” can typically be explained by a more careful remastering for the ‘hi-res’ version. 

As for “mastering to mp3”, such a concept is surely oxymoronic? 

 

Streaming providers are doing hi-res because that’s what consumers think they want, because marketing has convinced them so and, well, bigger must be better right?

 

Bigger must be better, but ONLY if the Sonos or any other app they use has a visual indication that says that what they are listening to is bigger - there is enough hand wringing seen here on why that indication is often not there to be seen. It is like they need their eyes to tell their ears of what is the bit count in the stream they are listening to, to be sure it sounds better. Quite silly.

Compare that to HD video where any indicator on the screen that says 1080P/HD is completely redundant. 

 

Streaming providers are doing hi-res because that’s what consumers think they want, because marketing has convinced them so and, well, bigger must be better right?

 

Bigger must be better, but ONLY if the Sonos or any other app they use has a visual indication that says that what they are listening to is bigger - there is enough hand wringing seen here on why that indication is often not there to be seen. It is like they need their eyes to tell their ears of what is the bit count in the stream they are listening to, to be sure it sounds better. Quite silly.

It gets even sillier when MQA fans crave the little blue light on their decoder.

 

Compare that to HD video where any indicator on the screen that says 1080P/HD is completely redundant. 

Ah yes, but sit far enough back from the set and they all look the same: SD, HD or 4K.

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Bigger must be better,

Of course it is, how else could they charge more for the service. 😁

Bigger must be better,

Of course it is, how else could they charge more for the service. 😁

Except many of them no longer charge extra for lossless, never mind ‘hi res’. 

It gets even sillier when MQA fans crave the little blue light on their decoder.

 

Compare that to HD video where any indicator on the screen that says 1080P/HD is completely redundant. 

Ah yes, but sit far enough back from the set and they all look the same: SD, HD or 4K.

PS: This did not go through at first writing - I find that on a large screen at recommended viewing distance, SD is not a pleasure anymore if the HD version is available. HD to 4K is not anywhere near that kind of a difference and not something I will change TVs for, and 8K will be pointless, I believe.

Appreciate your kind attitude Kumar, we all have our opinions, and that’s not a bad thing.  Take care.