Data limits and their impact on streaming music


Wondering if Sonos is working on making it easier to play "offline" music from mobile devices through services like Amazon, Google Play, etc. With the recent installation of data limits by Internet services, it would seem that a lot of people are going to start figuring out ways to avoid streaming music all of the time. If you have downloaded music via Amazon, for example, but haven't actually bought the songs, they are encrypted and you can't move them to the Music folder so that Sonos can find them. Has anyone figured out a solution to this?

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Unfortunately, the music services are not likely to license their encryption to third party apps and/or hardware. The only solution is to play from a local library of unencrypted music you have purchased online or ripped from CD. Though perhaps when Airplay 2 gets here, Apple will allow casting of local Apple Music downloads from the iTunes app.
@jgatie is right. There is nothing Sonos can do about this, it's not a technical problem but a licensing restriction. If you have a Sonos device with a line in you have a (slightly inconvenient) workaround.
Doesn’t Sonos Direct Control (Pandora, Tidal) allow this? How about Spotify, with its Sonos-supported casting protocol?

AirPlay 2 will likely allow it from any service on your phone, but it’s incredibly inefficient in comparison.

The old Sonos WD-100 Dock also allows you to play anything from your iPhone.

If it does, I'd assume it's because the other app is able to read the DRM that the 3rd party uses to lock down the files....
As I understand it Spotify Connect cannot play offline content through Sonos any more than you can through the Sonos app. I think Spotify ensured they had that base covered.

I would guess it would be the same for other services.

I don't have any of these so happy to be corrected.
Thanks to all who replied. I would think(hope) that since Sonos is just another route to hear the music with, the licensing isn't the issue. AMZN obviously doesn't mind that I'm playing downloaded content as long as I can't permanently save it without having paid for it first. Seems Sonos could simply redesign its technical interface to allow access to play the encypted files from the location they are saved in, but of course I know next to nothing about the technology so perhaps that is impossible.
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Where are these data limits being imposed? This sounds like a retrograde step by service providers? In the UK the move in recent years has been more towards a wider choice of ‘unlimited’ plans, with price points based on speed rather than capped data usage. Is this a consequence of net neutrality repeal in the US?
Thanks to all who replied. I would think(hope) that since Sonos is just another route to hear the music with, the licensing isn't the issue. AMZN obviously doesn't mind that I'm playing downloaded content as long as I can't permanently save it without having paid for it first. Seems Sonos could simply redesign its technical interface to allow access to play the encypted files from the location they are saved in, but of course I know next to nothing about the technology so perhaps that is impossible.You are completely wrong, except where you say you know next to nothing about this. Streaming services make definite distinctions between platforms in order to encourage users to subscribe to their paid services or to buy tracks outright. Sonos would be in court if they de-encrypted DRM media without permission. It is not a technical limitation. Believe that or not as you wish.
Thanks to all who replied. I would think(hope) that since Sonos is just another route to hear the music with, the licensing isn't the issue. AMZN obviously doesn't mind that I'm playing downloaded content as long as I can't permanently save it without having paid for it first. Seems Sonos could simply redesign its technical interface to allow access to play the encypted files from the location they are saved in, but of course I know next to nothing about the technology so perhaps that is impossible.

In order to "play the encrypted files from the location they are saved in", Sonos would need the encryption algorithm of the music service. Music services simply do not license their downloaded files encryption to 3rd parties, and if Sonos "redesign(ed) its technical interface" to do so, they would be in court in a flash.
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For iPhone users, AirPlay 2 will allow downloaded / cached music to be streamed directly from one’s phone to Sonos. Problem solved.