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Connecting external CD player to Play 1 speaker pair

  • 26 July 2018
  • 7 replies
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Hello: This is pretty much the first post I have made to any board (old 🙂. I'm sure the question has been addressed before in some way, but I can't find my specific issue. Plus, I am tech challenged, and don't fully understand some descriptions. Here is my situation:

--I now only have Sonos Play 1 pair. I have no stereo (all in one with CD player system died).
--I only want to play my CD collection through Sonos Play 1 pair.
--Clearly I need a CD player (prefer changer), which I will get (recommendations welcome, though)
--From my reading of posts, it appears I need a Sonos Connect, because Play 1 does not have Line In.
--Main question: Do I need Sonos Connect or Sonos Connect:Amp (note that I do not have an amplifier; I want to buy as little equipment as possible).
Any help would be hugely appreciated
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Best answer by jgatie 26 July 2018, 16:33

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7 replies

You need a Sonos with a Line-in. These are the Connect, Connect:Amp, and Play:5. At minimum you can get a Connect. A Connect:Amp will give you the extra ability to power a pair of passive speakers, and a Play:5 will give you another powered player.

As an aside, I would skip the CD player and just rip your CDs to a PC or NAS drive. That will give you the ability to put them in a queue, view titles, album art, search, make playlists, control playback, etc. all from the Sonos app. Far more convenient and powerful than a CD player, and it won't cost you anything but time. See this link on how to add your music library to Sonos:

https://support.sonos.com/s/article/257?language=en
In the time it takes you to get your NAS going, you can listen to internet music services like Apple Music for a monthly fee. You may well find that many if not all your CDs are part of their library. Plus millions more songs of course.
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Of course, you may want to maintain your CD collection for their aesthetic qualities, and as such, the amp or Connect Amp will allow you to do that.

I find NAS, Apple and Spotify are great as back up services, as are Google Music and VmBT Cloud, but I still like spinning a CD or a vinyl record.

Sonos is all encompassing.
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I bought a very nice Denon 5 CD changer and thought it was going to see a lot of use with my Sonos Connect. Once I got my CDs converted to FLAC and stuck on a WD Live Drive (external Ethernet hard disk) I haven't had the Denon turned on.

I'd say rip your CD collection to FLAC and see how that works out before dropping several hundred bucks on a noce CD player that you won't be likely to use.
Thanks everyone for the helpful info. Re: CD player vs. NAS, etc., yes, I'm aware of those. But it is time consuming, and I actually like playing the physical disks. Like reading an actual newspaper or book, it has a different feel and each CD brings back memories. Plus, I don't want to spend time learning the new tech 🙂 I suppose I should, but at the moment, time is hugely constrained, and I want to listen to the music now!
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Not a lot of selection of multi-disc CD changers out there today so they shouldn't take long to sort through, I didn't see anything in a quick look that impressed me a lot, probably one of the Sony 5 disc systems for $400 or so.
A cheap solution for less than USD 100 is a blu ray/DVD player, although you will not be able to load more than one CD. Check for compatible connection jacks - Left/Right audio out marked ones - on it because some do not have these now. But listening to "music now" is easier/faster via internet services. It is like having a jukebox, not just a mere changer. And you don't need the Connect either, in that alternative.