Apple Lossless v FLAC

  • 24 January 2013
  • 41 replies
  • 12354 views

Userlevel 2
I have been using a MacBook to create Apple Lossless on a NAS for SONOS and my PC to create MP3s for various Ipods and Car systems.

I want to start using Media Monkey to create FLAC on the NAS while continuing with ITunes for MP3

I have Ripped every CD twice and do this with each new CD producing two libraries.

Is there a more efficient way to use one PC to create two libraries one for NAS and one for Ipods?

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41 replies


Suppose, in a few years time, Apple decide to stop supporting the current ALAC format ...


Based on experience with Apple tracks trapped inside of DRM, Apple would probably allow iTunes users to "upgrade" (for a fee). Paying for music again and again is a very big business. Many users have purchased their music as LP's, and again as cassettes, then CD's, now streaming. (some may have done some 8-track too) I prefer the book model. Once I purchase the book, as long as I don't distribute copies, I can use the book as I see fit.

Once a track is encoded as FLAC, I have full control. If a company decides to block my control by not supporting FLAC, I will not use their products to play my music.
Userlevel 2
It works for me. God hope we don't have to through out all our Ipods and Ipads and Iwhateverisnexts!!

My original question has now been answered well and truly and I now understand all the pros and cons very well. Thanks everyone.
Userlevel 1
I actually believe it is the mainstream popularity of FLAC that has prevented Apple from locking ALAC down (and has allowed third party tools to utilise it without being agressively pursued by Apple's lawyers).


Source code for Apple lossless encoder/decoder - released by Apple under the Apache licence - is at : http://alac.macosforge.org
Source code for Apple lossless encoder/decoder - released by Apple under the Apache licence - is at : http://alac.macosforge.org

Yes, I forgot about this, but it's a relatively recent thing.

Again I'm convinced this would never have happened if FLAC hadn't existed and been very popular (and if there hadn't been third-party reverse-engineered tools to convert ALAC to other formats starting to appear).

As many commentators have suggested, if they really cared about Open standards, they would have just adopted FLAC which is more mature, more widely supported and (apparently) more efficient.

Cheers,

Keith
What a horribly inaccurate statement. Flac open source being compared to alac closed source (or does apple claim alac as open source now thinking its worth using)?

If you owned no apple products you'd have no reason whatsoever to use alac (and shouldn't).


Rubbish. If you want something that is as good to listen to as FLAC and want to use iTunes, Apple Lossless is fine. Nothing to do with Apple ecosystem - all about wanting to use iTunes as a track management system.
How many end users without Apple products choose iTunes as their music manager? And how many Apple owners don't use it?
Userlevel 4
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How many end users without Apple products choose iTunes as their music manager? And how many Apple owners don't use it?

Me. I don't use Apple products, I use iTunes. I also use ALAC and it works well.
Userlevel 1
I use ALAC for my main library which is synchronized to my NAS for Sonos. I simply rip (once) in iTunes to ALAC and then have a "Deja Vu" job I run regularly which syncs the iTunes folder tree across to the NAS.

BUT what I also do for the iDevices that I sync with iTunes and which don't have room for as much lossless music as I'd like is to check the Options box in iTunes for that device which says "Convert higher bit rate songs to 256kbps AAC" (where the bitrate is selectable via a dropdown).

This uses Apple's normal 256K AAC encoder "on the fly" just using the ALAC lossless copy rather than a physical CD as the source, so I get the same net effect as having ripped twice and managed the two libraries/copies but iTunes does that for me and I have the same playcount (etc) updated between my 64Gbyte iPhone which _does_ have room for the ALAC format music and my 8Gbyte iPod Nano which does not.
For those with the time, see attached for a view on how the lossy Apple codecs are of adequate quality as a source for hifi systems.

Entertaining, and perhaps quite valid.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/apple/itunes.htm
How many end users without Apple products choose iTunes as their music manager? And how many Apple owners don't use it?

IMO the very latest version of iTunes is a major step backwards by Apple by making it a less useful track manager.

The abolition of cover flow etc (to make it more appealing to iOS users) is wrong. I will still use iTunes, but in a Win7 environment where I can continue to get cover flow etc.

I don't use iTunes on my Apple stuff at all ! (MacBook Air, Ipad, iPhone) and with iCloud, I don't have to.

So I qualify on both your questions.
Rubbish. If you want something that is as good to listen to as FLAC and want to use iTunes, Apple Lossless is fine. Nothing to do with Apple ecosystem - all about wanting to use iTunes as a track management system.

ITunes is the ultimate in rubbish.
Me. I don't use Apple products, I use iTunes. I also use ALAC and it works well.

God, man. Why? That is the most bloated, poorest written code.
personal idea, FLAC and ALAC are both lossless and will sound identical. Even FLAC has advantage than ALAC since FLAC is open source while ALAC is powered by Apple. Both of two formats are lossless, open source, and of equal audio fidelity. FLAC can be supported by more devices and applications .And we all know that Apple devices cannot play FLAC. FLAC is unsupported by iPod, iMovie, iPhone, Mac, iTunes, etc while ALAC is. as for my personal experience, i downloaded a free program to convert flac to alac, http://www.videoconverterfactory.com/tips/flac-to-alac.html it can meet your needs on using one PC to create two libraries one for NAS and one for Ipods
And we all know that Apple devices cannot play FLAC.
Personal view - whenever possible, only use open standards and don't buy products that don't support them.
And we all know that Apple devices cannot play FLAC.
Personal view - whenever possible, only use open standards and don't buy products that don't support them.
yes, Free and practical things can be widely advertised:D
iOS beta 11 plays FLAC 🙂