Answered

Sonos is bankrupt!

  • 10 September 2017
  • 11 replies
  • 1814 views

ok, not really.
But no company has eternal life. Sonos doesn't have it neither.

So, let's use our imagination and imagine that Sonos goes bankrupt (doesn't matter if it is likely or not).

Q: What will happen to our speakers?
I presume we won't see any software updates coming (assuming Sonos won't open source it). But what else will happen?

Background: reason I'm asking is that I strongly dislike the risk of being reliant on a company to have my speakers to work and I'm not sure whether this is the case with Sonos.
I don't want to buy a "Revolv smart home hub" when I could have bought a pair of speakers that could last decades, barring technical failures.

What's your take on whether Sonos speakers need Sonos-the-company to exist or not?

Gijs
p.s. I realise that if the company disappears and new services emerge afterwards that they probably won't be supported either
icon

Best answer by passopp 11 September 2017, 11:14

Sonos, as discussed in another thread on this board, is a proprietary ecosystem requiring continous maintenance through updates in order to ensure ongoing compatibility with their online music service partners.
Without these updates, the system's online streaming features would slowly, but steadily cease to function.
Local network shares would not be as dramatically affected, as it would take a complete change in protocols for Sonos to stop getting access to your local library (i.e. see the current SMB v2 discussion on this board).

If you prefer speakers which last a couple of decades and can still be fully used even after the manufacturer went out of business I'd suggest a regular passive setup rather than a mini computer running a modified, unrootable Linux with some speaker hardwired to it.
View original

This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

11 replies

Userlevel 5
Badge +12
No chance by the look of how strong the market still is for them!. For me local NAS streaming and Optical in from the TV will be around for a long time to come so for my use I wouldn't be worried about longevity.
Clickbait nonsense.
Userlevel 5
Badge +9
Childish attempt to draw attention to a thread. Just ask the question and spare the rest of us the drama.
I agree; and since I don't have eternal life either, nor does electronic hardware, I can't be bothered with such trolling.
Userlevel 2
Badge
Where are the cartel sicarios when you truly need 'em?:@
ok, some (all?) of you don't like how the question was asked. Fair point.
What about the content? Can your Sonos player run without Sonos (the company)?
Sonos, as discussed in another thread on this board, is a proprietary ecosystem requiring continous maintenance through updates in order to ensure ongoing compatibility with their online music service partners.
Without these updates, the system's online streaming features would slowly, but steadily cease to function.
Local network shares would not be as dramatically affected, as it would take a complete change in protocols for Sonos to stop getting access to your local library (i.e. see the current SMB v2 discussion on this board).

If you prefer speakers which last a couple of decades and can still be fully used even after the manufacturer went out of business I'd suggest a regular passive setup rather than a mini computer running a modified, unrootable Linux with some speaker hardwired to it.
That was a depressing, yet useful answer: thank you!
That was a depressing, yet useful answer: thank you!

That is the worst case scenario answer. In reality, a brand like Sonos is not going anywhere, even if it goes Chapter 11. It will be bought out or absorbed, and some other company will take over. Eventually it may cease to be, but that is the case for nearly every device or appliance in existence today. Even things like refrigerators and washing machines now have IoT capabilities that will cease working if the parent company goes under. Same thing with standard audio/video devices like A/V receivers, Smart TVs, and Blu-ray players. If Denon/Onkyo/Vizio/Samsung/Sony goes belly up, you can probably still play AM/FM, cable TV, and your local Blu-rays, but eventually Netflix won't work, Amazon Video will change protocols, and Spotify Connect will stop.

You simply can't avoid it, and if you are worried about it, you might as well stop buying any new technology. But even that approach doesn't work. Remember, even those people who desperately clung onto SD television eventually had to move on.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Honestly, I think Sonos has a large enough customer base now that music services will be pressured to maintain thier connection to Sonos even if Sonos the company were to just disappear.

It is more likely that your sonos device has a hardware failure, or you've gone away from Sonos to whatever the latest and greatest is, then it is for your sonos to suddenly become unsupportted.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Honestly, I think Sonos has a large enough customer base now that music services will be pressured to maintain thier connection to Sonos even if Sonos the company were to just disappear.

The question is... is this possible? Is there enough information stored on your Sonos device to tell it the appropriate server(s) to connect to for the music service, or is it getting that info from a Sonos cloud-based server that would go away if Sonos does?

And also, while you may be able to control Sonos through the controller app in such a situation, things that do rely on Sonos-owned and managed cloud servers, like Spotify Connect (and I would imagine Amazon Alexa support) will likely stop functioning if Sonos goes under.

But I share the belief that Sonos would be acquired at a fire sale price by another company that would work to integrate the two and probably give a small amount of life extension to Sonos products before treating us to new products that won't be backwards-compatible and will be replaced within a year or two, in accordance with most other consumer electronics company product cycles. 🙂