Sonos goes bankrupt! What then?



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I would definitely agree. This service though is based on Sonos continuing to pay Amazon. How long would Amazon continue without being paid? Not very long.


Well, looks like you got me. You are right. You should not waste any money on Sonos on the oft chance that a company which is the market leader, had well over a billion dollars in sales last year, and has doubled its growth each year for the last 6 years will go bankrupt. Do not buy it, the risk is just not worth it. Instead, go buy a radio. But not one with tubes, because all the tube manufacturers are out of business.
The same worries follow through for everything you buy/use on a daily basis... your car, cell phone provider, electric company, Internet provider, your TV or fridge manufacturer, etc. Did you worry about any of that when you purchased? If a company goes bankrupt, there is a general a long line of proceedings held before it comes close to shutting down. You don't have to worry about that. Buy your gear.
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Sonos uses Amazon Web Services for its streaming architecture and routing/server infrastructure. I don't see Amazon going out of business too soon. ;)

https://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/sonos/


I would definitely agree. This service though is based on Sonos continuing to pay Amazon. How long would Amazon continue without being paid? Not very long.
This is the most likely result if the unthinkable happens!

On the what IF scenario, here's a question for you. The Sonos system is run via an app. If you use the app to run the TV or play music off of your computer or phone is Sonos's servers in the middle of that process? Does their servers go through some type of verification stage to allow the app to run? No verification, no running app?


Sonos uses Amazon Web Services for its streaming architecture and routing/server infrastructure. I don't see Amazon going out of business too soon. ;)

https://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/sonos/
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The likelihood is that if Sonos were to declare bankruptcy, someone would probably buy Sonos' assets, infrastructure, intellectual property, and whatnot, then continue to provide service for at least a known period of time as a condition of the sale. Depending on who were to purchase it, they might end up integrating Sonos products or technology into another product line, and thus they would continue providing service.

This is the most likely result if the unthinkable happens!

On the what IF scenario, here's a question for you. The Sonos system is run via an app. If you use the app to run the TV or play music off of your computer or phone is Sonos's servers in the middle of that process? Does their servers go through some type of verification stage to allow the app to run? No verification, no running app?
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The likelihood is that if Sonos were to declare bankruptcy, someone would probably buy Sonos' assets, infrastructure, intellectual property, and whatnot, then continue to provide service for at least a known period of time as a condition of the sale. Depending on who were to purchase it, they might end up integrating Sonos products or technology into another product line, and thus they would continue providing service.
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On a more serious note - if Sonos goes bankrupt, your local music library / everything on your iDevices / Androids will still be playing. Problems will be lack of links with 3rd party streaming services. I do think, however, you could enter internet radio stations direct ip addresses and listen to those.


I was mostly concerned about the system automatically stopping if the company went bankrupt. I've had clients lose their pension at age 60 when their top 500 company went bankrupt. This is a legitimate question.


I's a legitimate question, but the answer is obvious; sooner or later the system won't fully function. If you are worried about it happening, then modern technology is not for you.
I was mostly concerned about the system automatically stopping if the company went bankrupt. This is a legitimate question.

But, I would have thought, a technological impossibility??
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Internet. I think that is the key word here. This is why in five years the majority of the components will be outdated. That's why I mentioned throw away technology. I was NOT slagging Sonos in any way. It's just the field they play in.

I was mostly concerned about the system automatically stopping if the company went bankrupt. I've had clients lose their pension at age 60 when their top 500 company went bankrupt. This is a legitimate question.
First, Sonos does not consider itself to be a manufacturer of "throwaway" products. Their very first units, the ZP100 and ZP80 are still fully compatible and functional with current Sonos units, and they are over 10 years old. They go out of their way to maintain this compatibility, even to point of what some see as a detriment to future functionality.

Second, you can expect the units to continue working as today if Sonos suddenly goes bankrupt, however eventually the infrastructure will change and compatibility with services will start to dwindle due to new technologies and standards. But that goes for any and all internet technology.
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You know what? Life's too short to worry about what ifs!

You might get run over by a bus or hit by a meteorite on the way home, doesn't stop you going out.

Buy your Sonos system and don't worry about it.

OR, give me the money in the safe and secure knowledge I'll spend most of it on Booze, drugs and women - what's left over I'll waste!