Interview with John McFarlane, CEO

  • 24 October 2014
  • 47 replies
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47 replies

LOL guys.

Like you *did* watch and really listen to the interview right?

Anyway. have a nice day 🙂
Nah. I'm wasting my time. Forget it..

If you guys can't see the threats here..

:)


I thought you were going to disappear for another 6 months?:

Now I have discovered the accurate information as to the true reasons why some of these potentially great features are not allowed or cannot be made available, or seem to be flatly refused to be implemented by Sonos: I will not bother you again for another 6 or so months... Thanks for your time. Cheers. :)

Different people have different priorities I get that but offering even more ways to deliver the same 15m tunes and more reproduction hardware that is poorer quality than the last is not making progress towards the ultimate experience imho.


This is funny and sad because it is true.

From my reading - Spotify Connect requires a specific hardware to enable it.
I don't think that is the case. Some hardware players have added this retroactively. Spotify does not charge a licensing fee for Connect either.

If one follows the numbers, iTunes is the center of the universe and no one else should even attempt offer alternatives.Any smart business model should ride the iTunes tail, right? But, how many of these other business plans are on track to become a billion dollar music player company next year?

In Europe, Spotify Royalties Overtake iTunes Earnings By 13%
LOL guys.

Like you *did* watch and really listen to the interview right?

Anyway. have a nice day :)


I'll make you a bet, $1000 to each other's favorite charity, here's mine:

http://www.camneelyfoundation.org/

The bet will be that Sonos becomes a billion dollar/yr. company before Spotify makes a dime of profit. Care to take that bet?
Userlevel 2
The bet will be that Sonos becomes a billion dollar/yr. company before Spotify makes a dime of profit. Care to take that bet?

Can I have a share? Spotify UK Ltd made a profit last year. I know it's not the entire company...

Ironically the thing that got me in to all this was when Spotify was made available Sonos. Now I'm having to put up with the now rather clunky Spotify UI on the Sonos controllers when the Spotify mobile/tablet apps are feature rich and keep getting better all the time. But it still works for me and I can listen to my music, although I really miss Spotify Radio.

I may make the choice to switch to another streaming provider in the future if the Spotify implementation on Sonos becomes incredibly out of date with my requirements, but for various reasons Spotify is the one for me at the moment as it has been for the last 5 years or so. I'm not going to replace £5k of Sonos equipment with a competitor just because of one music provider.
Can I have a share? Spotify UK Ltd made a profit last year. I know it's not the entire company...



Sure you can have a share. But it has to be the whole company (and by the way, Sonos is poised to hit $1 billion in sales by years end).
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Devialet.. http://en.devialet.com/home-en-us/

[QUOTE=Kumar;239178]As far as 2 channel sound quality goes, there has been no progress anywhere on the amplification side in over twenty years, maybe thirty.
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I'm not going to replace £5k of Sonos equipment with a competitor just because of one music provider.

I think even wappinghigh would agree with that.;)
Spotify profits.

Really, for those who demand (only) the Spotify (or any other) native interface, one can attach a computer or whatever to a SONOS Line-In and have the best of both worlds.

While I haven't looked into the gritty details, it seems to me that a browser plugin could be developed to send Spotify tracks to a SONOS system. This would be a relatively easy route for SONOS if it actually feels threatened by the Spotify user interface.

Remember, here on the forums we have emotion driven speculation, SONOS has first class marketing research to back its decisions.
I think even wappinghigh would agree with that.;)

Considering he's been complaining about ensuing death of Sonos for 7 years, and so far has refused to sell his stuff for any of the myriad of competitors he stated were going to usher them to the grave, I agree.

While I haven't looked into the gritty details, it seems to me that a browser plugin could be developed to send Spotify tracks to a SONOS system. This would be a relatively easy route for SONOS if it actually feels threatened by the Spotify user interface.


There's also talk of a "play on sonos" API to allow third parties to push content from third-party apps to Sonos. We've already seen this enabled for Google Play Music and, if Sonos launches such a capability, it's not inconceivable that the vast majority of third-party music apps will implement it. Perhaps even Spotify will, which would answer all of the criticism here.

Cheers,

Keith
Remember, here on the forums we have emotion driven speculation, SONOS has first class marketing research to back its decisions.

With some speculation more emotional than others. 😉
Thanks for the time everyone

Here is to the continual success of this great product.

Rock on Sonos!
Userlevel 2
Don't want to do this totally to death but I also thought it very telling the nice Sonos chap making the point of how hard it was to do hardware. Maybe it is code for 'we've done to death the low cost resonant plastic speakers - only thing we're doing for the foreseeable is new quirky software stuff that gives the illusion of value'?
[QUOTE=ErikM;239225]Devialet.. http://en.devialet.com/home-en-us/

As far as 2 channel sound quality goes, there has been no progress anywhere on the amplification side in over twenty years, maybe thirty.
Good point. What I meant to say is that there has been no progress that has resulted in sound quality improvement that can be heard in a level matched DBT with any other amp that is permitted by the speaker loads to work within its designed limits. There have been numerous attempts to cover this in fancy, even well built casework using highly specified components that will probably give very long service for decades - useful only if the temptation to switch when the next great looking and cleverly marketed amp comes along can be resisted.
Improvements in measured performance that cannot be made out in a DBT are pointless - indeed they go against the definition of good engineering.
The only thing that seems to be a first that Devialet have done is using software to tweak the sound of the amp to better meet the needs of specific speakers - I haven't heard any comments yet on how useful that is in real life. Purist audiophiles will frown on that, because the amp isn't hifi to the source signal anymore, but if the final outcome of the sound delivered by the speakers is different enough to result in a preference, it may be useful. Though I can't see why this can't be duplicated by tone controls or, going further, by a well specified parametric equaliser that isn't very expensive these days.
Don't want to do this totally to death but I also thought it very telling the nice Sonos chap making the point of how hard it was to do hardware. Maybe it is code for 'we've done to death the low cost resonant plastic speakers - only thing we're doing for the foreseeable is new quirky software stuff that gives the illusion of value'?

At least they aren't doing snake oil hires carp that gives no value, illusion or not.
At least they aren't doing snake oil hires carp that gives no value, illusion or not.
I have to say that quirky software isn't a good thing either. I keep having trouble with my IOS controller and the only thing that works to fix it is deleting it and reinstalling it from time to time. On the other hand the Mac hosted controller is very stable even now so I am not sure if this is just a IOS thing. Hopefully future changes on the Mac controller side isn't going to change that.
Moving from a USB HDD to a NAS and installing a Boost has meant noticeably better stability in music play.
I am very curious to see the next developments dedicated to audio - AV isn't of much interest to me. And by developments I don't count the controller rejigs that keep happening, very little real progress there and added features seem to mean more glitches going by my experience.
Don't want to do this totally to death but I also thought it very telling the nice Sonos chap making the point of how hard it was to do hardware. Maybe it is code for 'we've done to death the low cost resonant plastic speakers - only thing we're doing for the foreseeable is new quirky software stuff that gives the illusion of value'?
Value? It's always had value. When I bought into Sonos 7 years back it was primarily as a wireless delivery system of bit-perfect lossless content to digital active loudspeakers. Nothing 'low-end' about it.

Since then the wireless transport has become more robust, the product range has got broader and its capabilities deeper. And that old ZP80 hasn't needed to have an extra penny spent on it.
... I keep having trouble with my IOS controller and the only thing that works to fix it is deleting it and reinstalling it from time to time ...

I'm not sure if this is a SONOS issue or an iOS issue. I'm not a big iPad user, but another App that I use regularly will crash from time to time. (at least daily) Most if the time I can simply force close the App and restart, however, sometimes a pad reboot is required. And, I'm not at all impressed with the iPad's wireless stability. And this "stability" seems to vary from location to location and minute to minute. I have a laptop with solid WiFi and often run it side by side with the iPad. This laptop's WiFi is very stable -- in stark contrast with the iPad.

Overall, my App needs to communicate with external devices and I think that the communication issues flustering my App fluster the SONOS controller too.
I'm not sure if this is a SONOS issue or an iOS issue.

I have a laptop with solid WiFi and often run it side by side with the iPad. This laptop's WiFi is very stable -- in stark contrast with the iPad.

As noted, the Mac controller is very stable, but it is more convenient to use the I pod touch.
Will changing to a handheld Android dedicated to Sonos work better? If so, any recommendations for an I pod touch sized vfm version? - I won't need any other service from it. I suppose I will then lose the current convenience of leaving the touch parked for charging in the Sonos Dock when not in use.
As noted, the Mac controller is very stable, but it is more convenient to use the I pod touch.
Will changing to a handheld Android dedicated to Sonos work better? If so, any recommendations for an I pod touch sized vfm version? - I won't need any other service from it. I suppose I will then lose the current convenience of leaving the touch parked for charging in the Sonos Dock when not in use.

What generation of Touch is it? I have few problems with a 4th Gen running iOS6.
I am not sure, but it is the last version that can be inserted into the Sonos Dock - I think I bought it in 2011. IOS 6 most likely.

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