Homepod vs Sonos


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BurtBushell wrote:

I think though that they are doing a reasonable job given the behemoths they are up against.


There is just no way to know either way; they don't publish quarterly financials since they are not a quoted company.

And Apple HomePod is an arrow fired across their bows as well - even if it today only makes sense to those that want voice controlled Apple Music. Till now, those people that wanted it had no way to get it and may well have chosen Sonos. And it is not just voice, Sonos still has not been able to offer its customers the use of the Apple Music native app, that will work flawlessly on HomePod now.

The Sonos problem is that their strongholds are being chipped away from many directions in many places. It is going to take something extraordinarily good from them to come through this unscathed.
BurtBushell wrote:


To be honest a person who will do this is not really the crowd that Sonos is after. I think if we were able to see the profile of the typical Sonos user you may realize this.


The JBLs are used by music listeners just as sophisticated as Sonos users.
But I gave you just one example. Another example at another end is the guy who gets a Dot, and uses it with a USD 150 price point Bluetooth speaker. Maybe this isn't the crowd as well? But the problem is that if you - as in Sonos - keeps talking that way for every non Sonos alternative, the crowd that is left for them keeps shrinking.
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You are ignoring the fact that the emergence of smart speakers has greatly increased the total addressable market (TAM) for Sonos. Many more people are buying speakers.

Consider two scenarios: a TAM of $100M of which Sonos’s share is a stable 50%, and a TAM of $1B of which Sonos has a stable 25%. Which is better for Sonos?
That is a good point.

The only thing we know for sure on that subject is that soon after smart speakers were launched, Sonos ran into trouble, laid off people and changed CEOs.

How they are now doing is something we can only speculate about. Or wait, for time to tell us.

I do see that their USPs have been under attack as the tech and markets changed around these, and in a crowded smart speaker market that will have large players in it, a new compelling USP isn't clearly to be seen till now.
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Kumar wrote:

It is going to take something extraordinarily good from them to come through this unscathed.



And that's what I am getting from you - you seem to be expecting some sort of doomsday for Sonos out of this competitive space. That's where we differ - I have no such expectation. Yes affected by competition but they will survive just fine based on what I see of their competitive moves to date. You think Sonos will stand still while Apple and others add features and new products???

Just my view.
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Another point Kumar. Its all well and good to predict trouble. It is better to suggest ways to combat the threat. What should Sonos do that they are not doing??? One mistake I thought they may have made is introducing seemingly unnecessary changes to the controller app that ended up distracting from some of the smart speaker moves.
BurtBushell wrote:

you seem to be expecting some sort of doomsday for Sonos out of this competitive space. That's where we differ - I have no such expectation..


I am not expecting doomsday - by all accounts, something of that kind happened to Sonos a couple of years ago, by their own admission. What I am asking is will they ever regain the position of being the gold standard in markets of their choice without going on reducing the scope of their market of interest. I am also not sure if, for the narrow focussed product company that they are, just survival will be sustainable.
I neither expect them to survive nor to fail. All I am saying is that the jury is still out on that and that is a new situation for them to be in - except in the early years of course.
BurtBushell wrote:

Another point Kumar. Its all well and good to predict trouble. It is better to suggest ways to combat the threat. What should Sonos do that they are not doing???


Lol. I did that as well. IMO, they blundered in not adding a line in jack to the play 1. For more on this see: https://en.community.sonos.com/wireless-speakers-228992/the-case-for-making-line-in-a-standard-feature-6800582
I need to be paid to offer more ways:-)).
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Kumar wrote:

BurtBushell wrote:

Another point Kumar. Its all well and good to predict trouble. It is better to suggest ways to combat the threat. What should Sonos do that they are not doing???


Lol. I did that as well. IMO, they blundered in not adding a line in jack to the play 1. For more on this see: https://en.community.sonos.com/wireless-speakers-228992/the-case-for-making-line-in-a-standard-feature-6800582
I need to be paid to offer more ways:-)).



Funny I also identified on this forum that no line in or other connectivity option was a blunder. I felt that way back when the Play1 was introduced it should have come with line in and bluetooth/airplay. It gives more flexibility. I felt strongly about that. Conversations that you participated in. At this point though not sure that this make a massive difference one way or the other. I was hoping you had more than that but it seems you want to be paid for it. :D
Over the years I have found that advice that is paid for is always heard/respected much more than that offered free. The latter is usually also unwanted so why waste time and energy?
The reason it still would have made sense to add it when the Dot was launched two years ago is in the thread I started. As one example, with a device like a Dot wired to it, the speaker also automatically becomes bluetooth enabled via the Dot. As well as Alexa enabled much faster than Sonos was able to make it.
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Kumar wrote:


The reason it still would have made sense to add it when the Dot was launched two years ago is in the thread I started. As one example, with a device like a Dot wired to it, the speaker also automatically becomes bluetooth enabled via the Dot. As well as Alexa enabled much faster than Sonos was able to make it.



We are in complete agreement here!
Circling back to topic: what is still missing in reviews is an assessment of music stability on HomePod compared to Sonos/Sonos Net. Given the poor track record of Airplay in this connection, in comparison to Sonos, this is relevant.
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Sonos will be okay in the near term, yes they are under attack by the 3 big boys on the block, Apple, Google and Amazon. But none have launch a home theater system. Right now apple offers it with HomePod and AppleTV. But if you watch regular TV you loose that ability. Forget google, they have a sync problem when using the aux plug on the Home MAX just using it as an external speaker for the tv. It was like watching a bad dubbed kung fu movie. Mouth moves then the sound comes from the speaker. Amazon has nothing for home theater.

So right now if you want the complete home sound system with home theater and high end multi room audio. Sonos is the only game in town. But sonos needs to up their offerings. Keep coming up with things to improve their system with the new technologies.

It is good they are not throwing all their eggs in one basket, with plans for google assistance and airplay2. I personally hate Alexa, it is to shopping driven. And while the dot is a good option. I really think that adding 50 buck to each speaker sets in the house to get higher end audio is a bit excessive. 200 buck if you need to add 4 rooms with high end audio speakers before the price of the speakers themselves. But cheap if you have high end audio already there and just want to add streaming to them. I wish the sonos connect was that cheap. But I have to admit, I am happy with the sons connect with my yahama dolby receiver and high end speakers. But everyone is different how they want to setup their home entertainment system.
http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-43346810

Sonos One
(TruePlay) helps the speaker adapt to its environment and, to be fair, it performed admirably in our cluttered bedroom, with a weighty, dynamic delivery that belied its tiny size.

Superstition, which confounded Apple's HomePod, sounded bright and lively, with a deep, funky bass and plenty of breathing room for Stevie Wonder's vocals.

Best of all, Sonos welcomes all music streaming services - with 49 currently available in the UK, including Apple Music (not all of them can be controlled by Alexa, though).

Here's the thing: With the possible exception of Sonos: One, you're not getting true hi-fi sound with any of these devices.
https://www.cnet.com/news/apple-homepod-vs-sonos-one-sound-quality-face-off/


The stereo Sonos Ones sounded more like a "real" audio system than the HomePod or Home Max, as long as we didn't try to rock out too hard. The smallest of the three, the Ones' compact dimensions inhibit deep bass, dynamics and high volume more than the HomePod and Max. Played at moderate volume, however, the Sonos Ones' clarity trumps the other two.

When it comes to comparisons between the Sonos and the Home Pod specifically, it was usually vocals that caused Apple the most trouble. The Sonos system had a natural ease with singers' voices, while the HomePod sounded less focused and lacked the clarity of its rival, as if vocalists were singing through their fingers.

So which one should you buy for sheer sound quality? At the current time, it's pretty simple: buying two Sonos One speakers will give you even better sound than a single HomePod. Stereo brings the best music listening experience overall, and the One's balanced sound benefits from Sonos' long history in making Wi-Fi speakers.

As good as it sounds for a single speaker, a month after its debut it looks like Apple is still working out the HomePod's kinks. If you want a kitchen or "pottering around" speaker, the HomePod might be more suited due to its omnidirectional nature, but even buying a single Sonos One gives you 80 percent of the sound for about half the cost.

That being said, my colleague David Carnoy liked what he heard during a demo of the stereo HomePods running beta software in the weeks before the Apple speaker's official release. We're looking forward to testing the HomePod and Sonos stereo modes head-to-head once Apple releases the final software.

But two HomePods is still going to cost considerably more than two Sonos Ones. And in the meantime, a single HomePod can't compete with two Sonoses just yet.

DarwinOSX wrote:

The HomePod is at least as good as a Play 5. Multiple reviewers have said this including the Verge which is hardly an apple site.

. Where did theVerge say it is as good as a Play 5. Their comparison Video was with a Play One. Do you have a link . I am interested.
Homepod
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My son-in-law bought his HomePod to my home a month, or so, ago, to compare with my Sonos One. Personally, I think the Sonos One sounded better. The 'One' was clearer and had crisper tones in the mid to high range. It was easily louder than the HomePod at their max volume. The only area where the HomePod was slightly better was the Bass, which was more rounded/mellow, but only just.

A pair of the older Play:1’s completely knock a single HomePod into touch, don’t let anyone fool you otherwise, ... that was very easy to see and my son-in-law completely agreed with me on that point. I would never buy a HomePod in place of a pair of Play:1’s.

I will add that the HomePod was very easy to setup using an iOS device, really simple in fact. Easier than the Sonos One in many respects. Siri on the other hand still has a long way to go yet to compete with the other voice services, like Amazon Alexa and Google.

If anything, the light effect on the top of the HomePod is quite pretty too, if you like that type of thing. I’ll never understand though why Apple decided to build the power cable into the speaker and not allow for much simpler lead extensions and replacements.

My thoughts having now seen and heard the HomePod at close quarters, is that Apple really need to reduce its price. I’m honestly quite an Apple fan too and use their products a lot, like iPhone, iPad, Apple TV etc; and the HomePod is good, but it isn’t great for the money it costs.

Since the comparison a month ago, I have gone onto buy the Sonos Beam for my dining room and to me that is a much better 'all round' product compared to the HomePod and far better value for money. I have no regrets at all with my choice of purchase.
Six Months with the Apple HomePod ALMOST convinced me it was good. :D

https://gizmodo.com/six-months-with-the-apple-homepod-almost-convinced-me-i-1828222019

Which becomes less appealing when AirPlay starts to skip and cut out, as it has done a few time in the last few months. So why should I go all in on AirPlay and the HomePod instead of using the Sonos One I already own? The Sonos One has Alexa built in, and Google Assistant is promised to come shortly. It nicely handles music over wifi vida the Sonos app. Plus, as of July 2018, the Sonos One supports AirPlay 2. It can’t handle phone calls, but the Sonos One can do nearly everything else the HomePod can do for $150 less. It even has a richer and more detailed sound quality!

So yeah, the HomePod is gorgeous, and AirPlay is often times fantastic, and Siri seems like... a thing that might become a useful thing one day. But the HomePod is still not worth its price—especially, when the Sonos One is so good and so cheap.

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