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Feedback risk?

  • 22 October 2018
  • 7 replies
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I'm planning to connect a turntable (with line out) via an ADC to my Playbar. The playbar will be mounted on the wall and the turntable will be a foot or two away, slightly below the Playbar, on a wooden bench on the wooden floor. There shouldn't be a risk of vibration (I'm banking on my neighbours warning me before I wind it up that high) but what is the likelihood of feedback from the speaker via the stylus / cartridge? My understanding is that cartridges only work on physical movement, and not on "audio through the air" like microphones - is that right?

Associated question, is there any backward-sound transmission from the playbar? If I mount it on the dividing wall, will my neighbours notice? ;)

Thanks

Kev
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Best answer by Stanley_4 22 October 2018, 19:47

The turntable will respond to vibration, the base or arm can both be a problem with air conducted sound while the base is also subject to physical vibration of what it is sitting on. A good quality turntable with the arm/cartridge properly set should be able to resist a reasonable amount of both. Your foot away and below should be good at moderate levels. Removing any top/cover/lid on the turntable while playing is usually a good idea too.

Worst case get longer cables for the turntable and move it several feet away and to the side when playing it and move it back when done. My turntable lived on top of my Klipsch La Scalla where it looked great most of the time but when things got loud it moved to a big pizza stone set on the floor well away from the bottom horn.

Any speaker mounted to a wall adds physical vibration conduction to the usual air making the wall vibrate so it may well bother your neighbors more. If I was in your situation I'd look at a non-wall mounted position to keep the neighbors happier.
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7 replies

Userlevel 7
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No speakers fire in the backward direction. Shouldn't be any different then any normal bookcase speaker against wall.
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No speakers fire in the backward direction. Shouldn't be any different then any normal bookcase speaker against wall.
Um, they do if they have bass reflex ports. Given that the soundbar doesn't have reflex ports, but when you put something that vibrates onto a brick wall it's going to create sound within the wall / cavity.
Userlevel 7
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so what is your question then?
Userlevel 7
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The turntable will respond to vibration, the base or arm can both be a problem with air conducted sound while the base is also subject to physical vibration of what it is sitting on. A good quality turntable with the arm/cartridge properly set should be able to resist a reasonable amount of both. Your foot away and below should be good at moderate levels. Removing any top/cover/lid on the turntable while playing is usually a good idea too.

Worst case get longer cables for the turntable and move it several feet away and to the side when playing it and move it back when done. My turntable lived on top of my Klipsch La Scalla where it looked great most of the time but when things got loud it moved to a big pizza stone set on the floor well away from the bottom horn.

Any speaker mounted to a wall adds physical vibration conduction to the usual air making the wall vibrate so it may well bother your neighbors more. If I was in your situation I'd look at a non-wall mounted position to keep the neighbors happier.
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Thanks Stanley_4, as I suspected. I don't wind the volume up very high anyway (as I like my neighbours) but do worry about the added vibration on the wall. It's not wall mounted at the moment but I really want to do that as I'm planning an AV refresh. Maybe I'll have to sing louder so they don't notice...
Userlevel 7
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Instead of a wall mount think of a mount tied to your bench that will not directly contact the wall. A floor stand would also work, a local iron monger should be able to knock out a nice looking stand (1" square tube) for a reasonable price as long as you do the painting, they charge a lot per hour to have them watching paint dry!

What can also help is a vibration reducing wall mount, making one can be fairly simple, two sheets of high density particle board separated by a sheet of vibration reducing foam (like an under machine vibration pad) spray glued in place, with one board screwed to the wall and the other to your speaker. Make a nice black fabric bag to slip over the mount and it will disappear into the background.
Userlevel 7
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the back side support (feet) also are rubber which should help