Can people stop complaining about DTS?



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Thanks for replying I did not see that before but In all honesty have listened to DTS for years through my Amp via optical. So should be possible right?

Are you connecting your source via a TV? Does your TV passthrough a DTS signal? If it can't than it's a moot point.


I am connecting my source (a Roku Ultra) directly to my TV (LG 65SJ8500) via an HDMI cable. The playbar is connected to the same tv with an optical wire. For some reason this does not pass through if the Roku is broadcasting DTS.. If I then switch to internal speakers I hear the audio
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Thanks for replying I did not see that before but In all honesty have listened to DTS for years through my Amp via optical. So should be possible right?

Are you connecting your source via a TV? Does your TV passthrough a DTS signal? If it can't than it's a moot point.
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Thanks for replying I did not see that before but In all honesty have listened to DTS for years through my Amp via optical. So should be possible right?
Let me quote from this:

https://www.lifewire.com/digital-optical-connection-1846881

Digital audio signals, such as 5.1/7.1 multi-channel PCM, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Atmos, DTS-HD Master Audio, DTS:X, and Auro 3D Audio cannot be transferred via Digital Optical connections. To transfer these types of audio signal formats you need to use HDMI connections.

Note that the majority of soundbars sold by Sonos are still based on the digital optical process. It's only the latest Beam release that can use an HDMI-ARC connection.
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I have content that is in fact streaming yet with DTS in there so no idea why this should not just be supported. It is a widely used form of providing audio so why would the playbar not be able to play or process it?
You could rip the disk to a local hard drive, and in that case, you would still be in DTS. I think others have stated this is their preffered method, and they then transcode DTS to Dolby.

My days of transcoding are over. I have wasted hours of my life waiting for movie to transcode before being able to watch the movie. I want to be able to slip a disc into my play, press play and watch it. Convenience is one of the things that draws me to Sonos. I have a house full of various devices, by my home theatre will remain off limits without supporting the stuff I already own.
Should I call Apple and tell them I’ll buy thousands of dollars of their brand if they “would simply integrate windows 10” to their interface?

Great analogy. Oh wait..........you can integrate Windows 10 with MacOS using parallels. Dang!

On a serious point, I would love to throw money at Sonos to replace my home theatre setup with something that sounds better (I do not dispute sound quality for the level of convenience), but the reality is I have loads of DTS Blu Ray disks and my current setup supports DTS. Therefore, I am not prepared to drop a few thousand dollars on something that gives me less functionality that I currently have.

I don't expect this for free and I am happy to pay extra - maybe as an add on so all those people who don't want it don't have to pay. But as things stand my money stays in my wallet. This is not a whinge, it's just the reality of the situation.
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Might be worth mentioning, but TVs that passthough DTS are still fairly scarce. Even if Sonos implement support (and I do still believe they should), many Sonos users, including myself, would still be unable to chain the signal from source to speaker.

It's probably unpopular advice, but the best way for Sonos users to get surround sound from their DTS content is to buy an xbox one or some other device that can transcode on the fly.
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"Samsung will no longer make any new 4K / Ultra HD Blu-ray players. Website Forbes was able to get this confirmed confirmation with Samsung, that includes UHD Blu-ray players by the way. A high-end model that was initially planned for January this year was also cancelled. It seems the trend is that we all move towards streaming video services like Netflix" More evidence to the fact that the future is streaming, meaning DTS won't be a problem for the majority, as streaming is in normal 5.1. I can see when Blu Rays were more popular it would have been a feature required by many but I really can't see why they would add it now when people will be moving over to streaming.

I don't know that Samsung's announcement is the best data to show that people are moving away from blu ray and DTS. It could be that the market is saturated with blu ray players already, or that people prefer different vendors for blu ray players. However, googling "blu ray disk sales" shows that sales of discs is definitely declining, while streaming services is increasing.

So, I'd agree with the conclusion that as time continues on, there will be less and less people who desire and could utilize DTS in their home theatre setup.
"Samsung will no longer make any new 4K / Ultra HD Blu-ray players. Website Forbes was able to get this confirmed confirmation with Samsung, that includes UHD Blu-ray players by the way. A high-end model that was initially planned for January this year was also cancelled. It seems the trend is that we all move towards streaming video services like Netflix" More evidence to the fact that the future is streaming, meaning DTS won't be a problem for the majority, as streaming is in normal 5.1. I can see when Blu Rays were more popular it would have been a feature required by many but I really can't see why they would add it now when people will be moving over to streaming.
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This remains a legitmate feature request for many users, and hopefully more people will throw their weight in. There isn't any good reason why those in the broader community wouldn't support it with goodwill.
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Just adding my voice here: I regret buying a Sonos Beam and it's more or less down to their lack of DTS support. I have lots and lots of blu ray discs and I had no clue about surround sound formats and how they are supported on different platforms - until Sonos Beam. The more I read about this and how to pry some transcoded Dolby Digital signal out of the cold dead hands of archaic home cinema hardware, the more people echo this marketing bull about Sonos being a solution for streaming customers who never ever owned a single disc nor expect to get surround sound from it, the more infuriated I become.
Why should people stop complaining about DTS? It's boneheaded and backwards to leave it out and it should be fixed sooner rather than later.


Completely agree. The beam and Playbar are primarily marketed as ‘home cinema’ and not music streamers (it’s an added bonus). To not support one of the most used formats in optical disc based media is frankly ridiculous. You are now limited in which uhd player you can buy (Samsung) as there are no other black box solutions to downmix DTS to DD. I would rather buy the Sony or Panasonic UHD players as they support Dolby Vision, but if I do I will only be able to watch films in Stereo. It’s 2019 and not 2003. I am honestly not sure why these codecs are not included in the beam when cheaper soundbars from other manufacturers carry them. If it’s a matter of cost then I would happily pay if a Software update was available.
Just adding my voice here: I regret buying a Sonos Beam and it's more or less down to their lack of DTS support. I have lots and lots of blu ray discs and I had no clue about surround sound formats and how they are supported on different platforms - until Sonos Beam. The more I read about this and how to pry some transcoded Dolby Digital signal out of the cold dead hands of archaic home cinema hardware, the more people echo this marketing bull about Sonos being a solution for streaming customers who never ever owned a single disc nor expect to get surround sound from it, the more infuriated I become.
Why should people stop complaining about DTS? It's boneheaded and backwards to leave it out and it should be fixed sooner rather than later.
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I love the beam but I think not providing the ability for DTS is limiting. I am currently looking to purchase a UHD player and only Samsung have the option to transcode DTS soundtracks to 5.1DD on the fly. I am now being forced down a route where I have to purchase the Samsung to get some surround sound otherwise I will be stuck with 2 channel PCM. Hopefully this will be addressed in the future with new product releases.
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Does the digital copy not retain the DTS soundtrack of the disc version?


No, aleast not in the way I meant 'digital copy'. You could rip the disk to a local hard drive, and in that case, you would still be in DTS. I think others have stated this is their preffered method, and they then transcode DTS to Dolby. Others take the code that comes with disk that gives them access to an online copy, then download it from the internet to a local drive. I'm not sure if that copy is now DTS or Dolby.

I personally will just use the digital code, combined with Movies Anywhere, that gives me access to stream the movie from any of my steaming accounts using the codec that those servcies support. So I can stream a movie I purcuase through hGoogle, Amazon, Vudo, xfinitiy, microsoft, fandango, or iTunes with no issue.
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DVD and Blu-Ray sales are still very strong & there's no harm in including a codec if you personally don't use it.


Personally, I buy blu-rays still, but more so for the digital coy that comes with it than the disk itself. The exception being 4k content which may not be available with digital. A part of me still like to have a hard copy in my hands, but I'm getting over it. Also, it seems like you can get better deals on disks than on digital copies alone.

Perhaps, I'm more of an exception than a rule, but the point is that disc sales don't exactly translate to people watching blu-ray in high numbers.

Also worth pointing out that the Sonos consumer is a subset of the overall market. The question is not so much disc sales overall, but disc sales of consumers who would also buy Sonos. That may not be too different, but I would be surprised if Sonos customers have yet to migrate from DVD to blu-ray.


Does the digital copy not retain the DTS soundtrack of the disc version?
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DVD and Blu-Ray sales are still very strong & there's no harm in including a codec if you personally don't use it.


Personally, I buy blu-rays still, but more so for the digital coy that comes with it than the disk itself. The exception being 4k content which may not be available with digital. A part of me still like to have a hard copy in my hands, but I'm getting over it. Also, it seems like you can get better deals on disks than on digital copies alone.

Perhaps, I'm more of an exception than a rule, but the point is that disc sales don't exactly translate to people watching blu-ray in high numbers.

Also worth pointing out that the Sonos consumer is a subset of the overall market. The question is not so much disc sales overall, but disc sales of consumers who would also buy Sonos. That may not be too different, but I would be surprised if Sonos customers have yet to migrate from DVD to blu-ray.
Most people going forward will be streaming from netflix, itunes and amazon and their content is in 5.1, so it looks like Sonos made the right decision bypassing DTS. DVD's and Blu Rays is not the future. I've got the 5.1 set up and all current content on netflix is in 5.1, no hassle of selecting different sound types from dvd menus for each movie, it just works. itunes is coming to Samsung TV's this year and when it does that is where I will purchase my movies from again all in 5.1 dolby sound. I see no reason to add DTS when the formats using it are dying out.

DVD and Blu-Ray sales are still very strong & there's no harm in including a codec if you personally don't use it.


If they were going to add it it would of been added years ago, not now with the huge decline in the formats using it. If you look at the pass-through sound table for 2017 and 2018 Samsung TV's they support 5.1 DD yet a number of them do not even support DTS 5.1.
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Most people going forward will be streaming from netflix, itunes and amazon and their content is in 5.1, so it looks like Sonos made the right decision bypassing DTS. DVD's and Blu Rays is not the future. I've got the 5.1 set up and all current content on netflix is in 5.1, no hassle of selecting different sound types from dvd menus for each movie, it just works. itunes is coming to Samsung TV's this year and when it does that is where I will purchase my movies from again all in 5.1 dolby sound. I see no reason to add DTS when the formats using it are dying out.

DVD and Blu-Ray sales are still very strong & there's no harm in including a codec if you personally don't use it.
Most people going forward will be streaming from netflix, itunes and amazon and their content is in 5.1, so it looks like Sonos made the right decision bypassing DTS. DVD's and Blu Rays is not the future. I've got the 5.1 set up and all current content on netflix is in 5.1, no hassle of selecting different sound types from dvd menus for each movie, it just works. itunes is coming to Samsung TV's this year and when it does that is where I will purchase my movies from again all in 5.1 dolby sound. I see no reason to add DTS when the formats using it are dying out.
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I'm sorry but you sound like you have no idea what you are talking about. Dolby Atmos is a codec that is albout 3d positioning of sound, not actual sound quality. You can have DD 5.1+ with Atmos, or Dolby TrueHD. Similarily you can have DTS, or DTS MasterHD (quality) with DTS-X(positioning).

Dolby Atmos is only really useful when you have more than 5.1. Which you can't get with Sonos anyway. What would be the point of adding Atmos support to Sonos? None, currently. Before Sonos should think about adding positioning codecs it should add lossless codecs or even basic lossy DTS!!


Not to speak for Ken, but based on previous conversations I've had with him, he is very aware of what Atmos is. I don't think Ken means to say he wants Atmos dumped into the existing 5.1 speaker setup, but to add additional speakers as well as the codec. Indeed, with the current Beam and Sonos Amp products, you can essentially play a dolby atmos encoded source and down play it to Dolby 5.1.


I agree that eventually it will head to digital streaming, but lets be honest. There is awefully little 4k content available on the streaming services because of the bandwith it requires. Also none of those streaming services have lossless audio, for similar reasons. And for home cinema those things matter. Otherwise you might aswell watch on an ipad.


Good point. For those who really want to invest in a full home theatre experience, they likely won't be utilizing streaming service just yet (when discs are an option) and would likely want DTS as well as Atmos and additional speakers. Then again, a big part of that demographic will opt for a wired solution and aren't looking to Sonos to fill that role.
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I don’t want to stifle anyone’s opinion, but I would hope Sonos ignore DTS and choose to go along with Netflix/Prime/Apple/Google and aim for Dolby Atmos instead. Discs will likely become a thing of the past or a rare item and replaced by Digital streaming anyway.

I can see Apple opening up their own streaming movie service soon to run alongside Netflix & the others. It’s possible they may do that within the current pricing of their music service.

My hope therefore is that Sonos remains focused on the majority customer base and stick with where those users clearly appear to be heading.


I'm sorry but you sound like you have no idea what you are talking about. Dolby Atmos is a codec that is albout 3d positioning of sound, not actual sound quality. You can have DD 5.1+ with Atmos, or Dolby TrueHD. Similarily you can have DTS, or DTS MasterHD (quality) with DTS-X(positioning).

Dolby Atmos is only really useful when you have more than 5.1. Which you can't get with Sonos anyway. What would be the point of adding Atmos support to Sonos? None, currently. Before Sonos should think about adding positioning codecs it should add lossless codecs or even basic lossy DTS!!

I agree that eventually it will head to digital streaming, but lets be honest. There is awefully little 4k content available on the streaming services because of the bandwith it requires. Also none of those streaming services have lossless audio, for similar reasons. And for home cinema those things matter. Otherwise you might aswell watch on an ipad.

Also, we are buying Sonos for today, not tomorrow. And today not supporting DTS is a serious handicap for those of us that bought Sonos for home cinema.
Full Disclosure,

1) I am NOT a Sonos owner. I was brought to these forums by my choice of surround sound equipment: Turtle Beach.

2) This is going to be long. I've got plenty of time and lots to say. Warning you in advance, don't just post TLDR.

If you really love your SONOS equipment, but want to play content that is sound encoded in DTS 5.1-11.1 (or LPCM 5.1-7.1) then I've got a suggestion. stick with disc based Video Game Consoles. Even if you never buy a game for them, they will properly convert via HDMI and Toslink either DTS 5.1+ or LPCM 5.1+ into a Dolby standard (don't know if it's always a corresponding Dolby, or if if automatically converts higher DTS to Dolby 5.1) on DVD (PS2-PS4 Pro, Xbox Prime-One 😵, Blu Ray (PS3-PS4 Pro, XboxOne-One 😵, 3D, (PS3-4 Pro, Xbox One-One 😵 HD DVD (Xbox 360 with proper add on drive), 4kK (Xbox One S-One 😵 and streaming services. (Xbox 360-One X, PS3-PS4 Pro).

If you have a different brand of audio equipment that only understands DTS, on the PS3-PS4 Pro, and the Xbox One-One X, the process is reversible and you can convert Dolby to DTS. Everything as early as PS2 and Xbox Prime can also not touch the signal and leave it native if you do have a lucky sound system that deals in all 3 formats, you can get everything.

By the way Amazon video simply states 5.1, neither "Dolby 5.1" nor "DTS 5.1" (nor "LPCM 5.1") just simply "5.1". Does that mean it's a crapshoot? Some content in Dolby, others in DTS? Or is all Amazon content compatible with BOTH Dolby and DTS?

Now I might have a problem if I inherit my Uncles Laser Disc collection. Turtle Beach headphone only convert Dolby 5.1 to Dolby Headphones (maybe newer ones can do higher forms of Dolby) but even their DTS X Headphone models take as an INPUT Dolby based signal, yet OUTPUT DTS Headphone signals. (Is that schitzophrenic or what?!?!?) I swear on my uncle's future grave (if it comes before MY future grave. I don't know, neither of us are dead yet. Everyone has a future grave, except the dead who have a present grave.) if there are any DTS Laser Discs in my collection, I'll be looking for either a DTS 5.1 headphone OR an External DTS-> Dolby converter, because there's no way you can hook up a Laser Disc player to an Xbox One S, unless someone can find a S-Video+Toslink -> HDMI converter that preserves DTS audio. And THAT may not work because the HDMI input was meant for Cable/Satellite TV, which universally chose Dolby. When I tried the Wii U through the HDMI input, it did not convert LPCM 5.1 into Dolby 5.1, so it probably won't touch DTS. But even if it did, it introduces horrendous ping, and live gameplay trumps surround sound.

My upstairs media rom is so atrocious that in 2008 our TV installer said, based on our room shape, a hypthetical "communal Surrouns system" would cost 5-figures just to install. The last words to describe the upstars livbing room is"centered" and "symmetrical". That's when my curiosity was peaked out headphones. Back then it worked,,because the upstairs Blu Ray was a PS3, at the time, the cheapest, and a darn excellent Blu Ray Player, just like our first DVD player was a PS2. why Playstation didn't continue the patern imnto 4K was anyone's guess. When I described my situation to a ceertain Vice President of the company that owns DTS and HD Radio, he says headphones are my best solution, and there are no DTTS Headphoens on the market that are cheaper than a video game player, possibly none at any price point.

I wanted the PS3 because it as a 3D Blu Ray player, and I just bought a Playstation 3D display, the number one all time best selling way to watch 3D content at home,and that's a 24 incher. I still use it for my Xbox One S, "even though it has HDMI and Component inputs, the Display is designed to work with the PS3, the PS2, and a Cable or Satellite service. Sony does not support Xbox 360s, or any of the Xbox Ones." If that's the logic according to Sony, it shouldn't work with a PS4 or PS4 Pro either. Luckily Blu Ray Players were cheaper than buying another PS3.

Then something strange happened, DTS Movies sounded flat. Apparently Turtle Beach did not say, "Not intended for non-video game sources of audio, as it does not support DTS media without using a game machine's conversions". but I didn't notice it THAT bad until a Sony 4K+3D blu Ray Player was SILENT on DTS movies. Not even a 2-track audio through Toslink. What's worse is THAT Sony 4K+3D player doesn't support USB Headphones, even though it has USB ports.

If there's a ray of hope, my Sony Bravia form 2009 does output all sound coming into it through the Toslink output, and I can run THAT into my Turtle Beach. Whether it natively passes Dobly 5.1 via HDMI or downconvert to 2 track, I don't know. I did hear a sound on a DTS movie when using the TV Toslink connector when running straight from the Blu Ray to the Turthle Beach was silence in DTS Movies, but I would have to compare the upstairs room to the downstairs room where I know it does full DTS-to-Dolby conversion before I can judge whether the TV has a DTS to Dolby converter or not. Funny: My Dad owns a 2D 1080p TV, AND A 3D 4K disc player.

IF someone can make a DTS-> Dobly converter that can work with everything from Laser Disc to 4K from DTS 5.1 to DTS 11.1 it would make a lot of Sonos sers happy. It would make me happy. If a game can process polygons while converting DTS to Dolby, then there should be a less powerful chip that can convert DTS to Dolby. Heck it was used on a PS2 and Xbox Prime. Okay, it could be updated to handle DTS 11.1 and LPCM 7.1, but other than that, it's less expensive than buying a game machine, which has to do so much more. Sonos: make it happen. Both for your users, and for Turtle Beach users like me.

The last benefit is that if you're using a Sonos for streaming only, and everyone uses Dolby, then you don't need to purchase it, It's an extra you don't need. But for the rest of us, it fills a deep hole.

By the way, I was lookiong for a formatting option to hide spoilers to make it less TLDR, but this forum doesn't have that option.
Hi, I found the Sonos discussions when Turtle Beach referred me for my problems getting DTS in my X41 and X42 headphones.

Normally Turtle Beach didn’t see it as a problem, because they thought all Turtle Beaches will be bought with Game Systems. And since Dolby 5.1 dominated on PS2, Xbox Prime, and Xbox 360 all Turtle Beaches were Dolbys. They assumed that everyone who bought them owned a modern game system, and PS2 and Xbox Prime had automatic, DTS->Dolby converters for DVDs. The Xbox 360 added an option to either "keep native" if your system can handle both Dolby and DTS, or all Dolby, if you owned a Turtle Beach or Triton, the 2 big headphone manufacturers at the time. I think the Xbox 360 is the only HD-DVD Player with DTS-> Dolby conversion. The Playstation 3 went one further, either keep native, convert all to Dolby, or Convert all to DTS.

If you want a 4K+3D player that can convert DTS to Dolby, so you can play DTS to Dolby on DVD, Blu Ray, 3D Blu Ray, 4K, and 3D 4K, the best choice is either the Xbox One S (if you don’t care about 4K gaming) or an Xbox One X (if you do). PS4 DOES NOT DO 4K.

And also, the whole world is not bandwidth endowed. If you want a place where I do some good for the bandwidth starved, by testing the games to see if they work in Bandwidth starved places, visit 56ok.org (full disclosure, one of my websites.) Yes there are some places that still use physical media, and not because we’re Amish. Good internet is not available everywhere. Plus some people want to own it instead of being at the mercy of the fleeting web which can stop carrying content on a whim. And forget finding 3D content anywhere except physical. I see NO streaming sites with 3D movies, let alone original series. And the only place to can be guaranteed a 4K 3D player without researching specific models is an Xbox One S or X.
Danny,

Yes indeed and just to say I only chose Dolby Atmos as being the road ahead, over DTS, because that’s where all the streaming services say they are now moving to. Not that it would really make any difference, until we eventually see the next gen Sonos hardware, like you say.

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