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Trueplay and Android

  • 11 January 2017
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I have nearly $2000 of Sonos equipment. I love Sonos. Now comes Trueplay for tuning my Sonos speakers. What? Only iOS? Does anyone else here have an Android phone? I have used a Yamaha 4000 sound bar for years with speaker tuning and I love it. I really think Trueplay would improve my Sonos experience so I guess I better get an iPhone? :S:?
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Best answer by jgatie 11 January 2017, 19:15

The reasons for no Android is the number of different microphones on Android hardware, even within the same model line, makes it impossible to configure the Trueplay algorithm for every one. iPhone mics are standardized to just a few models. so the configuration is possible.

Borrow an iOS device for an hour or so and Trueplay your system. All settings will still apply, and are able to be switched on and off, when controlled via Android.
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Just ask any Android app developer/programmer. It is a nightmare making apps for Android. Compatibility issue is a nightmare. You can never make an app compatible with every Android versions floating out there. And you cannot just make an app for latest Android version either. So, stop whining. Get an iPad or borrow an iPad. Simple. Stop bitching about Android.

Only Apple has few devices. In general it’s a standard that OS can work on many absolutely different devices. So stop whining :)

Is Trueplay is gimmick or real thing?

I’m one of those “sheep” as you call me, yet there are some rooms that I’ve TruePlayed, and heard absolutely no difference, and some that I’ve heard a positive change. Frankly, right now, there’s 3 rooms in my controller that haven’t been “TruePlayed”, because I don’t feel the need.

As you say, it’s not an absolute necessity. It’s just an extra that Sonos provides, but even without it, Sonos puts out absolutely outstanding product.

People saying they are in doubt about buying sonos for this reason are silly. im an android user and have not fine tuned my speakers, Sonos still sounds damn good. And how hard can it be to borrow an apple device. There are so many sheeps with apple stuff. 

Just ask any Android app developer/programmer. It is a nightmare making apps for Android. Compatibility issue is a nightmare. You can never make an app compatible with every Android versions floating out there. And you cannot just make an app for latest Android version either. So, stop whining. Get an iPad or borrow an iPad. Simple. Stop bitching about Android.
Homepod :)

Which only recently, I think, got the ability to be a stereo speaker, and still has no option to be part of a Home Theater speaker.
Sonos will introduce Auto Trueplay on its new portable speaker, meaning it will self-tune to the room, like Apple’s whatever-it’s-called speaker. Android users will no longer be left out. I’m guessing it will be coming to the One and Beam via a firmware update, but really don’t know.

https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/9/20799366/sonos-bluetooth-portable-speaker-model-s17
And the Android folk should be feeling less upset with Sonos now that they can still stream from their devices, a feature being deleted for only iOS users.
Certainly the cost of a beer to have a friend come over, and borrow their iOS device for 10 minutes is less?
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Would users be prepared to take their Android to a dealer and have its microphone calibrated? Would they pay a fee for this service?

I can't imagine this being cheaper than buying a compatible Apple device off the used market just for trueplay use.
Yes, it is so, for sure. You can toggle Trueplay off via Android if you prefer the sound that way. Or, if you shift the speakers to another location, till you get a chance to retune via a borrowed iPhone.
Oh great! Thx
Yes, it is so, for sure. You can toggle Trueplay off via Android if you prefer the sound that way. Or, if you shift the speakers to another location, till you get a chance to retune via a borrowed iPhone.
You could just borrow the iPhone to run Trueplay. Then you could toggle it at will using the Android device, I believe. You just can’t run the TruePlay process, but you can toggle it off and on.

Oh! Thx is tht so?! Then its not so much a disappointmt..:)

But because u r nt so sure when u said "I believe.." haha. Can anyone else verify tht this is so? Thx
You could just borrow the iPhone to run Trueplay. Then you could toggle it at will using the Android device, I believe. You just can’t run the TruePlay process, but you can toggle it off and on.
Would users be prepared to take their Android to a dealer and have its microphone calibrated? Would they pay a fee for this service?
Is it possible for a simple software solution whereby android users can borrow an iphone to tune, export a calibration file, and then simply download it into android?
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To be honest, the users may need to retune the speakers for some reasons... like moved them or reset them etc. Sometimes it's not easy to borrow an IOS device or to bother a friend for such thing. It will be great if there can be a solution for the Android users. Even it will be used for several times, I think a lot of people may rather pay for some 10 or 20 dollars instead of asking someone to borrow a device.

+1
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To be honest, the users may need to retune the speakers for some reasons... like moved them or reset them etc. Sometimes it's not easy to borrow an IOS device or to bother a friend for such thing. It will be great if there can be a solution for the Android users. Even it will be used for several times, I think a lot of people may rather pay for some 10 or 20 dollars instead of asking someone to borrow a device.
Well, I suppose....different use cases, different room layouts, different house layouts, different volumes, different voices, different expectations.....
The mics on the Sonos one's I have are terrible at picking up my voice especially when they're playing music.
I don't have a Sonos One, but the mic in my Sonos Beam quite often picks up a command intended for a much closer Echo Dot. I guess in that situation there is generally no music playing on the Beam.

I have seen people on here claim that the Sonos mics are not sensitive enough, and others that they are too sensitive. I have no explanation for that!
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You're saying the mics on the Sonos One aren't as good as the single mic on an iphone? I'm not really seeing that. I am speculating, but I think the function of recognizing a work word is partially due to the software that's doing the listening as it is to the ability of the mics. And tuning doesn't require voice recognition at all, just recognition of tones when you've told the device to listen for tones, as I understand it.


I agree with you that tuning doesn't require voice recognition, nor do I think that the mics on the Sonos one are worse than an iPhones, but the Sonos one compared to my Google home or my parents echo Dot, they are leagues behind. (you can hear the audio recordings in the Alexa app, and they're really poor quality).

I just don't think the mics in the Sonos are built for tuning like the Homepod/Google Home Max are. You would think that if they were, they would have introduced this feature already?

or maybe they're just really slow at software, I'm still waiting for Google Assistant support.
I'd argue that for TruePlay purposes, a microphone right next to the emission point of the sound will have difficulty picking up the aspects of the room dynamics. Much easier on a microphone that is in a separate device. I wouldn't say that has much to do with the quality of the microphones, but of their placement.

Now, I also don't think it's impossible to mitigate that with software, but I'm not smart enough to know how much of a possibility that is. I suspect that there's some amount of software adjustment being done so that it can "hear" your voice. But it's one thing, I think, to reduce the impact of what's being played in order to hear something else, and another entirely to listen to what is being generated, and reflected back.

I do know that if I want to tune a pair of speakers, I'd prefer not to have a jackhammer going in the same room. 🙂
As chicks alluded to, I think the ultimate solution will eventually be removing your phone from the equation entirely, and using microphones on the speakers. I've heard hints this method will allow for continues tuning, so tuning will update as you move the speaker around, or move furniture in the room around, without you having to specifically execute a tuning command.

The mics on the Sonos one's I have are terrible at picking up my voice especially when they're playing music. I doubt that they're good enough for tuning.


You're saying the mics on the Sonos One aren't as good as the single mic on an iphone? I'm not really seeing that. I am speculating, but I think the function of recognizing a work word is partially due to the software that's doing the listening as it is to the ability of the mics. And tuning doesn't require voice recognition at all, just recognition of tones when you've told the device to listen for tones, as I understand it.
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As chicks alluded to, I think the ultimate solution will eventually be removing your phone from the equation entirely, and using microphones on the speakers. I've heard hints this method will allow for continues tuning, so tuning will update as you move the speaker around, or move furniture in the room around, without you having to specifically execute a tuning command.

The mics on the Sonos one's I have are terrible at picking up my voice especially when they're playing music. I doubt that they're good enough for tuning.
As chicks alluded to, I think the ultimate solution will eventually be removing your phone from the equation entirely, and using microphones on the speakers. I've heard hints this method will allow for continues tuning, so tuning will update as you move the speaker around, or move furniture in the room around, without you having to specifically execute a tuning command.

As for Bluetooth, I feel that's largely becoming irrelevant as applications are developing alternative methods of casting audio from your device to Sonos without using Bluetooth. over wifi and/or through 'the cloud'. That gives you greater range and better quality that Bluetooth. You can currently do this with Amazon, Spotify, Pandora, iHeart, and probably others (not to mention Apple airplay). Granted, this does not work with every possible audio source the way Bluetooth does.

Personally, if airplay 2 proves to be successful, I can't see Google not coming up with their own version, making Bluetooth completely unnecessary in a wifi network. Not hard to see chromecast going this way.