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SAVE THE CR100


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Losing our two CR100s will be the most devastating thing to happen to our household.

My ONE YEAR OLD can play his favourite music by just pushing the button over and over again. My 7 year old will now PESTER ME CONSTANTLY to use my phone whenever he wants to listen to Harry Potter (which is ALL THE TIME)

My parents in law - NEITHER OF WHOM OWN SMARTPHONES will now have to go downstairs and switch on their PC in order to listen to the audiobooks and radio programmes I've given them. They don't use all these 'services', but Sonos is amazing so we built it for them, at great cost for the convenience of having the controller.

My wife won't be able to roll over in bed and hit the volume without blinding us all with your WHITE app in the middle of the night (swipe tap tap tap vs reach and push a button?????)

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DON'T DO THIS SONOS!!!!!

My Children and in-laws are going to HATE me for this.

DO NOT criticise our choices not to use smartphones, or Alexa, or Spotify. Why should we buy new things to make your system work?

PLEASE don't take away the ability to connect we are happy with basic controls?


What am I going to do now? Tell me WHAT?
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Best answer by Ryan S 2 February 2018, 19:08

Hi everyone, thanks for voicing your concerns here. We’re going to keep this as the main thread for this conversation so it’s all in one place. All the threads have been merged here, so my apologies if there are any conversations that had the flow messed up.

I want to provide more detail about exactly what will happen in the coming months and why. In early April, we will release a software upgrade that will no longer support the aging CR100. Here are your options:

  • Accept the upgrade, understanding that your CR100 will no longer connect. This is our strong recommendation for two reasons: 1) due the age of the battery in the controller, it has the potential to overheat when left charging for extended periods of time 2) you will continue to receive the latest features, bug fixes, and security updates. This is a far better solution for safety and performance reasons, but we realize you’ll need to transition to a new controller. We have resources available to help you get set-up on an alternate controller and are offering a coupon code to sonos.com to help make the transition easier (amount varies regionally, one per household).
  • Ignore future upgrades, leaving your Sonos system on its current version. We do not recommend this option. If you do go this route, you are acknowledging the risk of the aging lithium ion battery in your controller. Additionally, opting not to update means you will not receive any new features or future security patches for your entire system – not just the CR100. For example, being on an unsupported version means that you might lose connectivity to music services, as is already the case for Google Play Music on the CR100. It is necessary to configure your system in advance to avoid future updates. Any update applied to the firmware and/or to the app, even unintentionally, is irreversible.

Please reach out to discuss your specific situation and solutions with one of our team members, or if you’d like to better understand how to get set-up on an alternate controller. You can contact us directly at https://sonos.com/contact.

The CR100 can be disposed of at any local e-waste processing center in accordance with all local laws and regulations. To claim your coupon code or if you’d like a hand disposing of your CR100, please see here: https://www.sonos.com/cr100submit.

Updated March 23rd:
We appreciate the concern and your love of the CR100, and the team has been listening to your feedback here. We’ve tried to keep our reasons for making this decision clear.

The CR100 is a unique Sonos product as it has an internal lithium ion battery, which was never intended or recommended to be replaceable. Additionally, the hardware of the CR100 has aged. As you know, it already can’t keep up with new features. For these reasons, the best course of action for CR100s is to safely dispose of them.

We strive to keep products working with core functionality for as long as possible and we’ve worked to keep the hardware running for almost a decade since it was last available for sale. We have no plans to disconnect any of our legacy players, although in the future they may not get some new features that become available on newer Sonos products.

We always encourage Sonos owners to stay up-to-date with software upgrades, but ultimately this choice is yours. If you do choose to take steps to ignore future software upgrades, skipping the update in April that will disconnect the CR100 from your system, you will no longer be able to add speakers, and you will not receive new features or security patches. Additionally, opting not to update means you are acknowledging the risk of the aging lithium ion battery in your controller. Whichever you choose, we’re here to help and answer questions.
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3319 replies

The information is fine for its purpose, which is to tell a user how to connect to SonosNet on their own system.
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It is total garbage to suggest that it is possible to connect to a Sonos system with an Android device that has not previously been connected to that Sonos system via wifi. An Android device simply cannot connect to any Sonos system it comes across

@Damon77 is totally correct.

If true, I suggest you contact Sonos with an improvement suggestion to the article Damon77 referenced. It doesn't mention the need to connect via WiFi first.

I am happy to be wrong re: the Android App. As I mentioned previously, I have no experience with it. I can only go by what Sonos publishes about its use. If that information is incorrect...


Qouted from https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1589/kw/android%20sonosnet :

Connecting your Android device to SonosNet:

From the More tab, select Settings > Advanced Settings.
Tap “Connect to SonosNet” and “Next.”
Tap “Allow Connection” so it's checked, and select “Done” to complete the connection.

Once the connection is allowed, SonosNet will be added to the list of available wireless networks. Please note that the Android operating system will determine which network to connect to, if there are other options than SonosNet. The Android device may use SonosNet or it may choose another network. To force use of SonosNet, forget any other networks your device may automatically connect to.


This in itself shows you you have to be connected to the Sonos system BEFORE you can enable "Connect to SonosNet".
In order for you to connect to the Sonos system you first have to connect to the network Sonos is connected to: Your WiFi
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This in itself shows you you have to be connected to the Sonos system BEFORE you can enable "Connect to SonosNet". In order for you to connect to the Sonos system you first have to connect to the network Sonos is connected to: Your WiFi

I'm sorry, I didn't read it that way. The guide would be clearer if it first asked the user whether they had already connected via WiFi or not, before going through these later steps. That may be intuitive and implicit to you, but you presumably are a experienced Android Sonos App user? Consider the perspective of a new user who is just setting up their system for the first time.

Have a great weekend.
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You can only access those settings when you are connected to the Sonos system.

Good to have that clear :)

Enjoy the weekend!
Perhaps the misconception demonstrated by some on this thread is best illustrated by talk of the app being enabled to 'talk SonosNet', which is totally meaningless. Enabling SonosNet connection does not create a global ability to connect to any SonosNet. It enables the controller to send data using the SonosNet data link layer of your LAN. Note: YOUR LAN.
You can only access those settings when you are connected to the Sonos system.

Good to have that clear :)

Enjoy the weekend!
Exactly. The new user doesn't have to understand anything. They just need to be in the Sonos app (which of course they are) and follow the steps.
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Perhaps the misconception demonstrated by some on this thread is best illustrated by talk of the app being able to 'talk SonosNet', which is totally meaningless. Enabling SonosNet connection does not create a global ability to connect to any SonosNet. It enables the controller to send data using the SonosNet data link layer of your LAN. Note: YOUR LAN.

I quote: "Connecting an Android device to SonosNet allows you to have control anywhere you have Sonos speakers, even outside of WiFi range. Once enabled, the Android device will automatically connect to the closest Sonos speaker, not to your router’s WiFi, allowing greater control range due to the dedicated Sonos wireless network. This option is only available on Android devices."

Well, the above suggests non-LAN access to SonosNet or whatever the wireless mesh is that makes up the Sonos-proprietary network via Android. Whether that involves the LAN eventually is not the question. The distinguishing feature here is the ability of the Sonos Android App to communicate directly with zone players / speakers w/o the need for a WiFi connection by the Android App. That's a neat feature.

Anyhow, I never suggested that enabling SonosNet on an Android device allows it to connect to *every* Sonos network. Based on my reading of the instructions, I was under the (mistaken!) impression that a two-button pairing process with the Android App was possible via the above-referenced link even in the absence of a TCP/IP connection since the need for a WiFi connection to enable SonosNet on Android wasn't mentioned in the article.

Cheers!
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Long time ago I had a chat about Android and SonosNet with a Sonos support technician. In the end it is pretty simple. The SonosNet is a 'normal' 802.11b/g Wifi. When you enable the option to let an Android device connect to SonosNet, the Sonos App is simply storing a Wifi profile on the Android device with the (hidden) SSID and password on the and it will be able to 'see' and connect to the respective SonosNet.
This is also the reason why iOS devices can't connect to SonosNet, because Apple doesn't allow any app to store own wifi profiles on it's devices.
I wonder why the cr100 cant be the same.
From other users posts, like @controlav, the cr100 is an entirely different codebase than the cr200. I am not sure, but I think the cr200 uses the same basic code as the speakers (up until 7.2 or whatever) where as the cr100 stopped at 4.3.2. There has to be bits in the speaker firmware to support talking to 4.3.2 devices that they are removing.

Anyhow I still think two months is reasonable, all things considered.
You're really quite agreeable and rational on soooo many topics, Ken, but if you truly think a 2 month, or 4 month EOL notice is reasonable, I hope all your vendors move to that schedule.

Long time ago I had a chat about Android and SonosNet with a Sonos support technician. In the end it is pretty simple. The SonosNet is a 'normal' 802.11b/g Wifi. When you enable the option to let an Android device connect to SonosNet, the Sonos App is simply storing a Wifi profile on the Android device with the (hidden) SSID and password on the and it will be able to 'see' and connect to the respective SonosNet.
This is also the reason why iOS devices can't connect to SonosNet, because Apple doesn't allow any app to store own wifi profiles on it's devices.

This! A Thousand Times This! SonosNet is not some really advanced secret sauce or crazy magic. There are so many people here who should know better, but propagate the myth that SonosNet is fundamentally superior. It's just another Wifi network with a hidden SSID and maybe a slightly unusual encryption policy that's bridged to your regular ethernet LAN. But being able to connect directly to a ZP or Speaker instead of Wifi access point, then LAN to a Sonos device, and then finally to the ZP, traversing the network matrix instead of going non-stop.
[...] This! A Thousand Times This! SonosNet is not some really advanced secret sauce or crazy magic. There are so many people here who should know better, but propagate the myth that SonosNet is fundamentally superior. It's just another Wifi network with a hidden SSID and maybe a slightly unusual encryption policy that's bridged to your regular ethernet LAN. But being able to connect directly to a ZP or Speaker instead of Wifi access point, then LAN to a Sonos device, and then finally to the ZP, traversing the network matrix instead of going non-stop.
The 'crazy magic' is called Mesh networking, that's why SonosNet (judging from my experience) is far superior to every basic home wifi setup.
I'm sorry, I didn't read it that way. The guide would be clearer if it first asked the user whether they had already connected via WiFi or not, before going through these later steps. That may be intuitive and implicit to you, but you presumably are a experienced Android Sonos App user? Consider the perspective of a new user who is just setting up their system for the first time.
To enable SonosNet on a Android device the Sonos Controller is installed on, said device has to be connected to your router's wifi.
Some of the misunderstandings in this thread of the nature of SonosNet and how it operates within a user's LAN would be hilarious... except that these misunderstandings lead to ludicrous and false assertions, such as the claim that once an Android controller has been enabled to connect to SonosNet it can connect to any SonosNet it comes across, with no further security. This has to be challenged, because it is utter nonsense.
Yes, as mataglap and John B above are both collectively saying SonosNet is a 'hidden' WiFi network that connects between the nodes, rather than just emanating out from one single central point. That can often make the wireless signal much better and reach further than your home router WiFi, but it is no-less secure and you can’t use an android device to simply connect to any such system, otherwise passers-by and next door neighbours could have all been accessing our speakers. It’s wrong to think anyone can simply join your SonosNet network. The android device has to first be using the same WiFi network before it can then jump onto the associated SonosNet.

I don’t think this has anything to do with the demise of the CR100. I can’t see Sonos doing away with this network as in many cases it can be far superior to normal WiFi. I can see SonosNet being around for many years still to come, until at least our home WiFi routers and wireless devices work in a similar or identical way.
Let's face it people, this "The demise of the CR100 means they are getting rid of Sonosnet!" story is utter BS. Rank speculation based on nothing used to rile people up for the "Save the CR100" cause. I'm not sure even the proselytizer who came up with that nonsense really believes it.
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Well.. there ya go. It was always a futile battle but I'm sure we all felt better for our expressions of disdain in this forum.
Id just like to Congratulate SONOS on their victory and their increasing ability to royally screw over its previously passionately loyal customers. It seems you've won the CR100 battle. Never any doubt really. You didn't want it and you didn't care that we did. It was mis-managed, badly thought through and epitomised what I see as today's SONOS. A very different organisation from the first 5 years or so. The icing for me was learning that you also refused to allow your compensation Vouchers to be spent on Sonos product from your own distributors, (who launched you in this country). A remarkable dumb business decision. Stealing their customers too. Congrats.

And so Like many, I will disconnect my loved CR100's and start my research and journey to replace my SONOS. It may take me a few years but enough is enough.I know when I'm not wanted.
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Some of the misunderstandings in this thread of the nature of SonosNet and how it operates within a user's LAN would be hilarious... except that these misunderstandings lead to ludicrous and false assertions, such as the claim that once an Android controller has been enabled to connect to SonosNet it can connect to any SonosNet it comes across, with no further security. This has to be challenged, because it is utter nonsense.

Actually what is ludicrous is the fact that the average user who just wants to use the system that they bought and paid for as designed has to go through all this just to continue using their own property.

Has to be challenged...??? Challenge away ....the average user who is only interested in playing music is being forced into investigating methods to keep their property functional, everyone will bow to the mega posters superior knowledge I am sure .

What is ludicrous to me and actually very sad is the amount of time that a select few invest in disputing a subject that they actually admit means nothing to them. I can't actually understand the motive there.

Sonos CEO probably going to be looking for some new support guys for the next piece of hardware that gets the bullet, you guys should apply, you are doing a better job than the current Sonos Support crew for sure.
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KMurray - "Actually what is ludicrous is the fact that the average user who just wants to use the system that they bought and paid for as designed has to go through all this just to continue using their own property."

Spot on.
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So far I have 2 android devices running android 4.2, and 2 CR100's that have been deemed not usable / soon to be unusable with SONOS, my parents also have 2 android devices and 1 CR100 deemed not usable - more irritatingly they are in their 80's and could not understand why their android devices stopped working, my brother has 2 CR100's ... I believe - add up the cost of all this .... Even more annoying is that SONOS upped their prices very quickly when the $ exchange rate dropped after brexit - it is hovering back at around $1.40 but no moves on reducing prices. Someone is making a profit!! Look forward to SONOS developing a Linux app with those profits!!
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Sign the petition and contact Sonos customer support (https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/ask?_ga) and let them know what you think.

454 signatures and growing :D

https://www.change.org/p/patrick-spence-ceo-sonos-stop-sonos-from-disabling-the-cr100-controller-from-their-system?recruiter=121008685&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial.undefined

Also, consider locking down your system to prevent your CR100 controller(s) from being bricked - must be done BEFORE NEXT WEEK, i.e. when the 8.5 software/firmware update is rolled out). Checkout my guide here : https://en.community.sonos.com/controllers-software-228995/save-the-cr100-6800510/index86.html#post16220262
The 'crazy magic' is called Mesh networking, that's why SonosNet (judging from my experience) is far superior to every basic home wifi setup.

It's called Spanning Tree Protocol, 802.1d, and was published as an IEEE standard in 1990.
1990 — Original publication (802.1D-1990), based on the ISO/IEC 10038 standard
1998 — Revised version (802.1D-1998), incorporating the extensions 802.1p, P802.12e, 802.1j and 802.6k.
2004 — Revised version (802.1D-2004), incorporating the extensions 802.11c, 802.1t and 802.1w, which were separately published in 2001, and removing the original Spanning tree protocol, instead incorporating the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) from 802.1w.

One of the reasons that Sonos has sometimes problems with not-simple networks including other mesh network equipment (Google Wifi as an example) is that everyone else is using RTSP (from 2001).

Yes, STP is cool, that's why it's been in commercial use for 25 years. And yes, Sonos was the first to put it into a widely available residential situation, which helped make Sonos easy to use in the 2000's.

My point is that SonosNet is not "magic", it's a very nicely done integration of industry standard protocols and techniques applied to a fairly narrow market segment (residential audo) that cleanly hides the underlying technologies and complexities from Sonos customers for ease of use. That was excellent work Sonos did 15 years ago!

If someone is going to talk about what it should do, or how to use SonosNet to solve a user's problem, then that person has a responsibility to be correct and accurate.
I wonder if it will be Tuesday ?
It's called Spanning Tree Protocol, 802.1d, and was published as an IEEE standard in 1990.
1990 — Original publication (802.1D-1990), based on the ISO/IEC 10038 standard
1998 — Revised version (802.1D-1998), incorporating the extensions 802.1p, P802.12e, 802.1j and 802.6k.
2004 — Revised version (802.1D-2004), incorporating the extensions 802.11c, 802.1t and 802.1w, which were separately published in 2001, and removing the original Spanning tree protocol, instead incorporating the Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) from 802.1w. [...]

Correct, but SonosNet is also a MeshNet (depending on STP).
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I wonder if it will be Tuesday ?
No gloating please, some of us are going to be effect more than you! 😞
I wonder if it will be Tuesday ?

I'm really curious what the update will provide. #1 on my wishlist is implementation of the Alexa AudioPlayer interface, which will enable all sorts of things, like AnyPod, Stitcher, Radio Paradise, MyMedia (local files), soundscapes via voice control.
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I wonder if it will be Tuesday ?

Very sad Ken, that you would expend time and energy putting that together. Kinda negates the charitable claims that your pals are making regarding the motives for being posters in the thousands counts.

Never mind , you will soon have the place to yourselves again when this all dies down and all those pesky once satisfied customers have jogged off .....ah happy days eh?