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SAVE THE CR100



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My gut feeling is that direct intervention by Sonos Support is needed to add a CR100 and that that will not be available. I believe it is already the case that Support will only help if a system is on the latest firmware, and I would be surprised if it were otherwise.
It’s a wireless 'remote' for goodness sake, it’s not really the end of the world...

Actually, it's OUR wireless 'remote' that we still use daily.

Here's a quick peek in to the possible future:

It’s a Zoneplayer for goodness sake, it’s not really the end of the world...


What is it they say about assassins?

The first kill is tough, the 2nd is much easier...


So that I don’t become a victim here myself, I thought I would offer this now rather old link as a kind of peace offering ... some here may one day find the information pages and the links useful:

CLICK HERE

At least, I am still keeping this thread alive as the tide sweeps in... but you are really going to be on your own after the Tuesday 8.5 update, assuming it is this Tuesday, of course?

I would rather that people reduce their risk though and keep safe, that’s if you plan to lock down the hatches and hold onto using such old lithium-ion battery powered CR100 devices. Any risk taken, of course, as Sonos mentions, is then entirely going to be your own.
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.... I would rather that people reduce their risk though and keep safe, that’s if you plan to lock down the hatches and hold onto using such old lithium-ion battery powered CR100 devices. Any risk taken, of course, as Sonos mentions, is then entirely going to be your own.The lithium battery thing is a real red herring as at least one user has posted, they removed the battery from their CR100 ages ago when it failed (safely) and still use the CR100 daily via the low voltage power lead.

No battery, no risk. ;)

But still Sonos and their "fan club" insist we have to stop using our CR100s because they MAY become unsafe at some point in the future. 😞
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Sign the petition and contact Sonos customer support (https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/ask?_ga) and let them know what you think.

461 signatures and growing :D

https://www.change.org/p/patrick-spence-ceo-sonos-stop-sonos-from-disabling-the-cr100-controller-from-their-system?recruiter=121008685&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial.undefined

Also, consider locking down your system to prevent your CR100 controller(s) from being bricked - must be done BEFORE NEXT WEEK, i.e. when the 8.5 software/firmware update is rolled out). Checkout my guide here : https://en.community.sonos.com/controllers-software-228995/save-the-cr100-6800510/index86.html#post16220262
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Are you saying that any Sonos software on a CR100 will work with 8.4? If not, surely as soon as you try and add an older controller to your system it will require an update.
Not having performed an exhaustive study, I cannot say either way. However, if the firmware has not changed since 2014 as the splash screen suggests, then it's more than likely that any CR100 that has been attached to a internet-connected Sonos system will have been updated to 4.3.x or wherever development for the CR100 ceased.

Additionally, if my reading of the 8.5 implementation description is correct, Sonos is not going to brick the CR100's outright. Rather, they will instruct the 8.5 and up zone player firmware to ignore the inputs from a CR100. It's a lawyerly approach, allowing Sonos to claim that they didn't disable the CR100 but rather that the firmware moved on and is no longer compatible with the CR100.
The lithium battery thing is a real red herring as at least one user has posted, they removed the battery from their CR100 ages ago when it failed (safely) and still use the CR100 daily via the low voltage power lead.

No battery, no risk. ;)

But still Sonos and their "fan club" insist we have to stop using our CR100s because they MAY become unsafe at some point in the future. :(


TJRL,

When I discussed such matters with my Wife Jane and the Kids, they were not prepared to allow me to take those risks that go against the manufacturers 'official' advice, regardless of whether the actual narrative may eventually turn out to be the truth from Sonos, or not.

The family each had concerns, that centred around if I were to later 'mistakenly', or 'forgetfully', leave the CR100 on continuous charge in its downstairs cradle overnight, particularly when the grandchildren came to stay with us on a sleep-over.

So my decision to swap my CR100 controller for a Sonos £100 voucher, was really made for me by the family, but having said that, the compensation did feel like a fair exchange to me anyway, in my own particular circumstance, as I was considering purchasing a new Sonos One anyway.

I appreciate you may have other entirely different reasons for your chosen stance, but my family were just not prepared to entertain the manufacturers mentioned risks that are involved.

In perhaps a similar way, I decided to throw out and replace a bedside radio alarm clock recently, as we had had that for a good many years too (at least 8 yrs to my knowledge) and whilst it worked fine, it began to develop a noticeable low frequency hum. Anyhow we decided it wasn’t worth the risk keeping it due to its age and considering the amount of use we had already seen from it ...and so we replaced it.

I guess any sign of risk at all, we don’t hesitate and prefer to err on the side of caution. It’s not just a Sonos 'Fanboy' thing, it’s a 'Family Safety' thing in my case.
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As I see it any lithium ion battery in the home is a potential fire risk. Whether they're in a smartphone, laptop, iPod, the CR100 controller, etc. our homes are full of them. Any of those batteries can let go without warning if a manufacturing defect (like the Samsung smartphone debacle last year) leads to an uncontrolled exothermic reaction. Yet, I doubt any of us religiously put our lithium-ion battery-carrying devices in a fireproof container whenever we're not using / supervising them.

Lest you laugh, there is precedent for that. The repeated fires on Boeing 787's due to overheating lithium-ion batteries in the aircraft emergency battery backup system led the FAA to mandate fire containment systems that not only can survive the fire without failure but which also vent the resultant toxic gases overboard. Show me a home with that level of containment for *all* lithium ion batteries within...

Yet, here we are, living with the threat of uncontained battery failures leading to fires on a every-day basis. We rely on superior engineering to contain failing batteries from going exothermic: Thankfully, most Lithium-Ion batteries simply swell and/or die quietly when they eventually fail, just as designed.

Sonos has already answered one poster here that there is no known, immediate threat related to their CR100 battery, likely due to the fact that a real threat would require them to initiate a product recall in much of the developed world. For example, the CPSC would have a field day in the US with a product that the manufacturer publicly acknowledges as a fire threat. AFAIK, the UK and the EU seem to have similar agencies and / or methods to deal with unsafe products.
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[...] More positively the updates URLs have been blocked at their end through their account management interface. That's good news as I can add more URLs if necessary and I had been concerned a new router (they've already replaced 2) would be immediately vulnerable. My CR100s can't update! :D
The CR100s won't update anyway, they will remain on firmware v4.3.2. The pending update v8.5 refers to the speakers, and I think afterwards the CR100 will not be able to identify/recognize the units any longer.


Good point. At least in terms of "belt and braces" I am less vulnerable than before.

Thankfully I have 2 sets of Sonos speakers that are absolutely future-proofed - some SP100s which I didn't realise are also magnetically shielded. Should have kept my CRT TV and gone retro - no need for a Playbar or Playbase as it had its own subwoofer .:D
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Go on then, somebody put me out of my misery.

If the CR100 is docked and the LED on top turns from amber to green, does that mean it’s fully charged and there’s no more juice going in to the battery?

If so, doesn’t that negate any fire risk?
Go on then, somebody put me out of my misery.

If the CR100 is docked and the LED on top turns from amber to green, does that mean it’s fully charged and there’s no more juice going in to the battery?

If so, doesn’t that negate any fire risk?


But then the power discharges, like every other device connected over WiFi, or with a standby light and (presumably) when a certain battery level is reached it will begin to charge back up again, won’t it?

I’m not an expert in this field, but I do know if you take the CR100 off the cradle and even switch them off completely in the Advanced Settings, the device battery will eventually still go flat overtime, so they must charge/discharge whilst they are left switched on and in the cradle, me thinks?
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Sign the petition and contact Sonos customer support (https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/ask?_ga) and let them know what you think.

463 signatures and growing :D

https://www.change.org/p/patrick-spence-ceo-sonos-stop-sonos-from-disabling-the-cr100-controller-from-their-system?recruiter=121008685&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink&utm_campaign=share_petition&utm_term=psf_combo_share_initial.undefined

Also, consider locking down your system to prevent your CR100 controller(s) from being bricked - must be done BEFORE TOMORROW, i.e. when the 8.5 software/firmware update is anticipated to be rolled out). Checkout my guide here : https://en.community.sonos.com/controllers-software-228995/save-the-cr100-6800510/index86.html#post16220262
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I’m not an expert in this field, but I do know if you take the CR100 off the cradle and even switch them off completely in the Advanced Settings, the device battery will eventually still go flat overtime, so they must charge/discharge whilst they are left switched on and in the cradle, me thinks?

The battery will self-discharge, like any battery, over time. The rate of self-discharge depends on the type of battery and even within a given class of batteries, there are going to be differences. For example, compare a Eneloop AA NiMH to a bog-standard NiMH battery re: self-discharge. One behaves almost like an alkaline, the other has to be recharged monthly. No different on the lead-acid side with some AGMs achieving self-discharges at 1/10th the rate of cheap starter flooded cells.

The battery charging circuit is completely separate from the unit charger. IIRC, the power coming into the unit is regulated to somewhere in the vicinity of 6.3VDC at up to 500mA or whatever. The maximum battery charge voltage for LiON is somewhere between 4.2-4.1, depending on the exact cell type. So the dedicated battery charger will pump in just as much power as needed to keep the LiOn cell at whatever voltage the OEM specifies for standby / waiting / float / etc.

IIRC, keeping a LiON cell at around 80% of full charge maximizes it's life, keeping it fully charged all the time can attack some of the cell grids that enable the battery to function. That said, my CR100's have been perfectly fine being in their respective cradles for years, with only the occasional pickup and 'non-connected' use. That is, they likely spend 99% of their existence in their powered cradle.
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The lithium battery thing is a real red herring as at least one user has posted, they removed the battery from their CR100 ages ago when it failed (safely) and still use the CR100 daily via the low voltage power lead.

No battery, no risk. ;)

But still Sonos and their "fan club" insist we have to stop using our CR100s because they MAY become unsafe at some point in the future. :(


TJRL,

When I discussed such matters with my Wife Jane and the Kids, they were not prepared to allow me to take those risks that go against the manufacturers 'official' advice, regardless of whether the actual narrative may eventually turn out to be the truth from Sonos, or not.

The family each had concerns, that centred around if I were to later 'mistakenly', or 'forgetfully', leave the CR100 on continuous charge in its downstairs cradle overnight, particularly when the grandchildren came to stay with us on a sleep-over.

So my decision to swap my CR100 controller for a Sonos £100 voucher, was really made for me by the family, but having said that, the compensation did feel like a fair exchange to me anyway, in my own particular circumstance, as I was considering purchasing a new Sonos One anyway.

I appreciate you may have other entirely different reasons for your chosen stance, but my family were just not prepared to entertain the manufacturers mentioned risks that are involved.

In perhaps a similar way, I decided to throw out and replace a bedside radio alarm clock recently, as we had had that for a good many years too (at least 8 yrs to my knowledge) and whilst it worked fine, it began to develop a noticeable low frequency hum. Anyhow we decided it wasn’t worth the risk keeping it due to its age and considering the amount of use we had already seen from it ...and so we replaced it.

I guess any sign of risk at all, we don’t hesitate and prefer to err on the side of caution. It’s not just a Sonos 'Fanboy' thing, it’s a 'Family Safety' thing in my case.


Well Ken you have been turned over.

First Item
Email received yesterday 8th April from Mike Carlino. I have put Mike's responses in bold.

This needs a simple statement, Is the CR100 safe or not safe?
Not Answered – ‘the CR100 battery is safe’.

--> The CR100 is safe.


As explained I think Sonos owners are entitled to a full answer, my kids sleep in the same house as the CR100. Is the CR100 safe or not safe, the battery is just one part. On the presumption that you meant the whole CR100 then this raises the question over the latest email received.

‘Additionally, if you continue to use your CR100 and ignore future software updates, you are acknowledging the risk of the aging lithium ion battery in your controller.’

If the product is safe, then there is no liability to acknowledge.
If the product is not safe…..

On what grounds do Sonos believe they have the right to deny liability for the product?
Not Answered.

--> The CR100 is safe. If this were not the case, we would assume full responsibility and communicate this to our customers with urgency. We acknowledge the reference to the aging batteries may have been confusing/misleading, again, not our intent. Our messaging has been adjusted. The main focus is the hardware limitations of the now 13-year-old device that we are no longer able to solve for as part of the system.



Second Item
https://www.sonos.com/en-us/cr100

Can you point out any mention of a safety issue? There is no safety issue with the CR100 according to Sonos. What safety issue were you worried about.




And just for my kicks the ZP100 could set your house on fire while you are asleep. I'm not having a pop at Sonos at all. Any electrical device could set your house on fire if it is plugged in and turned on at the socket and some form of fault develops. I suggest for your own safety and that of your family you turn off every electrical device in the house before retiring for the night. I believe wind up mechanical alarm clocks are available but don't over wind or the spring could break and have your eye out. In the case of your wifi router you could turn it off much earlier, and maybe leave it off. Much appreciated.

Note: your smoke alarms may well have battery back lithium batteries - better turn them......no hang on. Catch 22.

Dave
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I have just choked on my wine
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I have just choked on my wine

Amen

PS - having returned to these boards, I'm tempted to stay well after being cast off into outer space by the next update. The efforts of the charitable police and their friends are simply splendid. I'm particularly enjoying the thread on the new Sonos One that wakes its unfortunate owners in the middle of the night. Apparently, according to the charitable police, this is down to cats turning them on. Not Sonos. Oh no. Of course not. How nice not to be able to buy one. (Sonos One that is - cats are fully compatible with CR100s).
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Well Ken you have been turned over.
Not so much "turned over" more "none so blind as those that will not see"! ;)


PS - F00tS0re's post is spot on, just too long to reproduce in full.
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That is an interesting question. Has CR100 firmware been the same for long enough that you could add units from systems older than 8.4 to an 8.4 system without triggering an update? I wonder at what version the last change to CR100 firmware happened? Or is the CR100 firmware version just incremented to match the current level without any other code changes? That would probably force an update if that was the strategy being used.[/quote]

If that is the case, then someone with 'those' skills should be able to sort that for us and even expect remuneration for there efforts. Uunfortunately I suspect a deeper issue regarding a coms change between 8.4 and later that Sonos have chosen not to solve, but an entreprenuer who does could at least pat themselves on their back and maybe make a quid or two in the process.

To paraphrase a JC comment, how hard canit be to extract the firmware version code from a device and then reload it if required?
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...
When I discussed such matters with my Wife Jane and the Kids, they were not prepared to allow me to take those risks that go against the manufacturers 'official' advice... I guess any sign of risk at all, we don’t hesitate and prefer to err on the side of caution. It’s not just a Sonos 'Fanboy' thing, it’s a 'Family Safety' thing in my case.


@ Ken_Griffiths
Once again I feel I have to disagree with you. Not for your choice to discontinue using your property but for suggesting that the to attempt to remain at an older firmware and continue to operate the CR100s is against the "offical" Sonos advice.

If you notice on the "offical" answer given by sonos (see page 1) on this post clearly gives two options (one preferred by Sonos over the other) but both valid options.

In Australia at least (and probably most other countries) consumer law is incredibly clear in the case of dangerous product (as the safety idea used to justify killing CR100s would class CR100s as a "dangerous product") and a clear path forward in the form of a product recall exist (and is mandatory). This is not time limited and attempts by Sonos to say that continuing to use CR100s will magically pass this risk onto the consumer is just non-sense.

When challenged on this point (I think it was f00ts0re a few posts), Sonos (in writing) admitted that there exists no safety issue with the CR100s.
{@Ryan_S please contradict this statement if this not the written advice given by Sonos}

The idea that proactively CR100s need shutting down just incase one day they become dangerous is just non-sense, either the products are dangerous or not dangerous (it cannot be both). Only Sonos can make this call and there is an extremely clear legal mechanism (in Australia at least) for product recalls and the exceptions with respect to there implementation and due compensation of consumers.

I'm sure both your & my "Family Safety" are more important to SONOS than an being cheap on doing a product recall. The only reasonably conclusion left is that Kill in CR100s is for "Corporate" reasons not "Safety" ones.

In which case I'm sure you can appreciate the distinction between offering consumers free upgrades for there system (to which they can choose to use the features or not) and implementing an almost "mandatory" downgrade of customers systems which were legally purchased in good faith at significant cost to the consumer.

I respect your right to discontinue using your CR100, we only ask SONOS to respect our rights to continue using our systems our way or if they feel they have good "corporate" reasons to "drag us" then be respectful that we value these units and compensate people generously. (Think "Carrot" not "Stick"... refer to the Logitech example)

I'm sure I could offer 10 better ways this could have been handled, where loyal long term customers are not left feeling stiffed by SONOS with some fiction about safety. :? I'm sure also could think of some if you put your mind to it :?

Whist it is getting late I don't believe it is to late for SONOS to do the right thing by their customers. 😃
Perhaps I'm just "tilting at windmills" but I would prefer to think the best of people not the worst.
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Perhaps I'm best to offer some suggestions about alternative solutions rather than saying they exist.

This is not meant to be a comprehensive list just a suggestion for all parties to think outside the box, please consider them constructively or perhaps a combination of these and/or others.

Lets start with the obvious ones:

1) Don't retire the CR100s, allow them to degrade organically over time. (Ok this may not be a option but it's a good place to start)
Costs:
Who knows??? probably a small on going cost
Benefits:
Customers still get what they paid for!
Advertising value that Sonos understand their users use the system for a wide range of applications and sonos support user choices - your music, your way!


2) Officially "retire" support for CR100 but allow CR100s to connect to the latest firmware if customers undertake replacement of the batteries or repairs. Allowing CR100s to live on for those willing to maintain them (think right to repair) and reducing Sonos product liability for repaired products.
Costs:
Negligible??? CR100s presumably already exists in there code base, it probably it has cost more effort to kill it off(?)
Benefits:
Saves Sonos customer support costs
Public Relations benefit of Sonos' commitment to all Sonos products old and new. (Knowing with Sonos you can grow your system over time)
Customers still get what they paid for! Basic functions should remain functional. Some functionality on some third party services may degrade over time but that would occur organically.

3) "unofficial channel" for legacy firmware (eg system can be rolled back to older firmware)
Cost to Sonos: 1 hr of coding time & Some storage space on the update server
Benefits:
Saves support costs as it's an "unofficial" channel
Customers are not version locked on legacy products so can invest in further Sonos gear

4) A password to stop the system updating without owners consent
Cost to Sonos: 1 hr of coding time
Benefits: Allow users to maintain their system without resorting to extreme fire walling measures.

5) A fairer compensation package. Something that reflects the investment people have made in this equipment and the value customers place on these units eg if you own more than one unit you have more to loose. Something that reflect the true cost of replacement with a comparable product (not just the cheapest tablets anywhere but not purchasable with the voucher)
Costs:
A bit of Sonos gear at cost.
Customers loose there CR100s but at least feel they have been treated reasonably.
Benefits:
Customers loose there CR100s but at least feel they have been treated reasonably.
Good will of long term Sonos customers and advocates.
Customers are not version locked on legacy product so can invest in further sonos gear

6) A voucher to the SONOS store that doesn't require people to fork out further to get the cheapest product in the Sonos store.
Costs:
A bit of Sonos gear at cost.
Customers loose there CR100s but at least feel they have been given something in return rather that being stung again for more equipment that they may not even want or need.
Benefits:
Good will of long term Sonos customers and advocates.
Customers loose there CR100s but at least feel they have been given something in return rather that being stung again for more equipment that they may not even want or need.


7) Give something for nothing. If there really are only a few early adopters (i have my doubts) still using CR100s in their system, then give something of real value to CR100 users eg probably the latest thing Sonos are pushing eg Ones / Echo Dots / a decent tablet controller etc. If Sonos are so convinced that voice control is the way all things should be why not prove it with your oldest customers! Let loyal customers have a win not a loss.

Costs:
A bit of gear at cost.
Benefits:
Advertising value as a stunt would justify the cost.
Good will of long term Sonos customers and advocates.
Think of the advertising potential.
Customers are not version locked on legacy product so can invest in further sonos gear
Worst case:
A few users whom have stopped using their CR100s may have a win fall but think Sonos are great and recommend it to all their contacts.

😎 Release the CR100s to the open source. Software & hardware allow the community to "save the CR100s"
Costs:
Negligible (what is the intellectual property value of discontinued legacy products worth)
Passionate users can either give money to support the maintenance / development of features for the CR100 or skills and effort.
Benefit:
Easy way to deny responsibility for ageing hardware as the units must be "hacked" to continue operating
Saves Sonos customer support costs
Advertising value as a stunt would justify the cost.
Users hardware could degrade organically over time but users could continue using them "unoffically"

9) Run a CR100s competition. End offical support but Run a hack a CR100s Competition, most creative, user beneficial, most obscure use etc
Costs:
Some free give away Sonos gear & some marketing time.
Benefits:
Easy way to deny responsibility for ageing hardware as the units must be "hacked" to continue operating
Saves Sonos customer support costs
Advertising value as a stunt would justify the cost

10) Offer trade-ins for a comparable controller CR300
Costs:
Ok, so its un-likely but I'm sure you get the point



I'm sure there is plenty of people on all sides of the discussion willing to complain about these suggestions but perhaps if everyone save that energy and put it into finding a better alternative outcome their may still be a win for all parties (SONOS, CR100s users, and Old & New Sonos users) :?
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Folks,

Finally a reply from Patrick Spence.

I haven't replied yet, I'm on my way in to the office, but will write a brief reply back this afternoon.

As least the formal offer of one voucher per controller has been made, so get those applications in

Full content below:
-----------------------------
Dear John,

Many thanks to you, and to all of our passionate customers that have taken the time to share feedback with me directly via email and in our community. The feedback/discussion in our community is something that all of us here pay close attention to. It illustrates a level of passion and engagement for Sonos that mirrors the level of passion that the team and I have for building, and making better every day, the Sonos experience.

We agree with the benefits of the CR100 that everyone has outlined. Many of them are the same reasons we introduced it back in 2005, and certainly why we’ve worked so hard to extend the life of the product as long as we have. It’s a product that we are very proud of.

Arriving at the conclusion that the CR100 could no longer be supported as part of the system is not something we took lightly. Hardware this old has real limitations that we’re no longer able to solve for without compromising the rest of the experience. By consumer electronics standards, the CR100 is essentially a 10-generation old mini-computer, and it is not sustainable or scalable for us to keep it going – or even for us to keep supporting it via a legacy build, as you proposed (as it’s something we contemplated).

It is our commitment to you, our customers, that we will always strive for the best possible experience for the system. Continuing to keep the CR100 in the mix would come at a negative impact to the Sonos system overall as we look ahead, which is a reality independent of the state of the battery in your device.

We weren’t as clear up front as we could have been around the fact that a customer can choose to stay on the existing software and forgo new updates if they want to continue to use their CR100(s). Of course the downside is you won’t get to enjoy the new features or add new products. I wanted to be sure everyone is clear it’s their choice whether to upgrade the software or not.

We recognize the early investment you made in these devices, so in direct response to your feedback, we have been extending the $100 coupon to all CR100 devices you own. Please contact our customer care team to make the request if you have not done so already.

Additionally we have resources for alternatives to address some of the concerns outlined in moving to another controller. Here’s one to start.

https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3241?_ga=2.110335747.727596262.1523297296-281356077.1521237538

We’ll continue to add and share more in the community to help people with options that may address some of the valid concerns people have in making the transition.

I appreciate your feedback and passion on this. We’re here if you have any additional questions or need support. And, as always, this email is available if there’s anything else I can do to help.

Best Regards,

Patrick

______

Patrick Spence

Sonos | Chief Executive Officer | patrick.spence@sonos.com

O: +1 xxx xxx xxxx | Twitter: @patrick_spence
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😎 Release the CR100s to the open source. Software & hardware allow the community to "save the CR100s"
Costs:
Negligible (what is the intellectual property value of discontinued legacy products worth)
Passionate users can either give money to support the maintenance / development of features for the CR100 or skills and effort.
Benefit:
Easy way to deny responsibility for ageing hardware as the units must be "hacked" to continue operating
Saves Sonos customer support costs
Advertising value as a stunt would justify the cost.
Users hardware could degrade organically over time but users could continue using them "unoffically"

9) Run a CR100s competition. End offical support but Run a hack a CR100s Competition, most creative, user beneficial, most obscure use etc
Costs:
Some free give away Sonos gear & some marketing time.
Benefits:
Easy way to deny responsibility for ageing hardware as the units must be "hacked" to continue operating
Saves Sonos customer support costs
Advertising value as a stunt would justify the cost



So much this
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Finally a reply from Patrick Spence...


At least Patrick had the decency to replay in person and acknowledge (or near enough) they have been lease than honest about the reason behind the decision making process and highlight the fact the decision was completely independent of the state of the battery in your device.
I'm please to hear they took the effort to at least consider a legacy option but personally I'm still hoping for a more creative solution:?


...We recognize the early investment you made in these devices, so in direct response to your feedback, we have been extending the $100 coupon to all CR100 devices you own. Please contact our customer care team to make the request if you have not done so already...


@johngolfuk
When you reply could you please ask for clarification on the following questions,
1) The expansion of the Coupon scheme is this specifically for you or is this being extended to all signatures of the partition or all CR100 owners?
2) Are these able to be used concurrently eg 4x$100 coupons = $400 coupon or just 4 discount vouchers that must be used separately? eg could a valued customer with get something they want with the vouchers or just a discount on 4 things they have little need of?

Thanks for you effort with this.
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Dear John,

We agree with the benefits of the CR100 that everyone has outlined. Many of them are the same reasons we introduced it back in 2005, and certainly why we’ve worked so hard to extend the life of the product as long as we have. It’s a product that we are very proud of.


I love language, but what is with the 'we'. PS has been in charge for 5-minutes and is killing the CR100. Maybe PS could consider using the word 'they' or 'Sonos'


Arriving at the conclusion that the CR100 could no longer be supported as part of the system is not something we took lightly. Hardware this old has real limitations that we’re no longer able to solve for without compromising the rest of the experience. By consumer electronics standards, the CR100 is essentially a 10-generation old mini-computer, and it is not sustainable or scalable for us to keep it going – or even for us to keep supporting it via a legacy build, as you proposed (as it’s something we contemplated).

So that is the nail in the coffin for the ZP80/ZP100 then. They are that old, have the same hardware limitations as they have the same chipset. RyanS already confessed that the memory/code savings of the CR100 are minuscule so don't expect any new features as a result.
Why isn't maintaining a 'beta track' for a sidelined 8.4 not sustainable. Cost is negligible, support is not required. It is a once off set-up for Sonos to write some basic instructions, that are a rehash of beta instructions. Then you are on your own.

It has always been this way for legacy stuff. I've got a Buffalo Terastation that is older than Sonos I think, I doubt Buffalo support have anyone around from when it was a current model. I am on my own (with a network of other owners that keep these NAS dreadnoughts operating).

This is a won't not a can't. Being able to not upgrade should be a right not fight, it shouldn't require turning off auto-updates on other devices.

Additionally we have resources for alternatives to address some of the concerns outlined in moving to another controller. Here’s one to start.

https://sonos.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3241?_ga=2.110335747.727596262.1523297296-281356077.1521237538

We’ll continue to add and share more in the community to help people with options that may address some of the valid concerns people have in making the transition.

I note not a specific piece of actual hardware is mentioned, just a fluffy instruction on how to a get a piece of android hardware working if you buy the right one. How about some actual costed examples of nice looking android devices, suitable no-touch docks, and a guarantee that they support screen pinning or whatever. I am not a member of the Sonos development team, I am a customer.

Dave
Userlevel 5
Badge +4
Nice work JR. Thanks.:D
johngolfuk,

Just to say, I’m am really glad you received a personal reply to your letter from the Sonos CEO, before the update as you had hoped for and it appears to have achieved one outcome that I did not expect and that is the company is currently now offering you one voucher per CR100 controller. I assume it will be clarified if that offer extends to everyone involved and who contributed of the letter, or indeed everyone in the community.

Anyhow it was well worth the effort that you put into the letter and I think the CEO offer is worthy of consideration, though I’m sure some here have previously mentioned already that such an increased offer is still not for them.

Anyhow I think you achieved a good outcome from it and your efforts should be applauded by all, regardless of what other outcomes anyone else here was perhaps hoping for.