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SAVE THE CR100



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3233 replies


The sole forum reply there so far is:

If you configure the Sonos so that it has a fixed IP address, no 'default gateway' and no dns then it won't be able to access anything beyond your router.

I've explained a little more about Sonos. ;)


The only way I know of, to technically fix a Sonos IP address, is via a main routers DHCP reservation table.. you cannot remove the gateway settings or the dns which it gets from the router via DHCP. There is (as far as I’m aware) no way to fix these things on any Sonos device... unless you know something that I don’t?
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I wish Sonos would stop telling us they're "reaching out". They seem to reach just far enough to tug my chain.

Dave - I applaud your selfless stance with regard to not accepting your exceptional (as in "not the norm") offer base on 3 CR100s. I didn't pursue this when I called them before Easter, I just wanted to see if they volunteered any escalation since RyanS had previously invited me to "reach out" (yep) to them.

I've found that the CR100 cradle makes an almost perfect unpowered stand for the Huawei Mate 10 Pro. Perhaps Sonos would like to help me populate all my cradles with these large screened, splashproof android devices at £529 each since they're not offering me anything for my otherwise redundant cradles.

I've also found out that my ISP doesn't release the security details to its supplied router which only allows the most basic admin features; but I've got the rest of the week to come up with a solution even if it means disconnecting the broadband to force my kids off their PS4s. Hmmm.:?


Jeeves,
use your ISPs router just as the gateway, and add an appropriate Wi-Fi router that will do the filtering between the Gateway and your network. then you do not have to worry about your ISP.


Hmm. I saw a diagram during a search that showed a WAN socket for connecting to another router for this type of configuration, but my Mickey Mouse one doesn't have this (always wondered what this was for on my old ISP's one).

I have found access to "Port Mapping" and "Port Triggering" so I don't know if setting up some rules and then disabling them will work e.g. 4444 -> 4444 but disabled (is that the port or the "rule" though). Seems you have to do this for every Sonos IP address and I've got quite a few...

I've sent the ISP support a message but as you can probably tell I'm fumbling in the dark and their Firewall switch is a simple on/off without other options.


Jeeves,
not sure if this has been addressed, but one way you can look at the whole "LAN" VS "WAN" port thing is to consider that the DSL or CABLE wire coming into the ISP provided router is essentially connected to the WAN port as its on the WAN side of the router.
the LAN port is always the connections into your local private network.
So, if you have an ISP that is providing a router than does not allow for much management you can always get an additional router that will give you the required management.
Connect its WAN port to the LAN port of the ISP provided router, and then all of your network gear MUST be on the LAN side of the new Router.
Notes: If you are also Getting your Wi-Fi off the ISP provided router then you MUST disable it and setup the Wi-Fi on the new router to manage your house. You can mimic the original for ESSID and PW if you like.
You do not have to setup the ISP provided router as a bridge, if you do not the only thing to be aware of is the subnet being used on the ISP router and your personal router, they MUST be different subnets.
Years ago they all used the same subnet on the LAN side, most vendors have moved to different subnets so that may not be an issue.
hope this helps, but if you have any other questions let us know.
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The sole forum reply there so far is:

If you configure the Sonos so that it has a fixed IP address, no 'default gateway' and no dns then it won't be able to access anything beyond your router.

I've explained a little more about Sonos. ;)


The only way I know of, to technically fix a Sonos IP address, is via a main routers DHCP reservation table.. you cannot remove the gateway settings or the dns which it gets from the router via DHCP. There is (as far as I’m aware) no way to fix these things on any Sonos device... unless you know something that I don’t?


to further what Ken stated,
If you can set a static IP assignment to a specific MAC address, to assign fixed LAN IP's to the Sonos units they you should be able to just give it an IP and Subnet Mask and keep the Gateway and DNS servers as zeros.
this would keep the sonos gear behind the wall.
I do assign all my Sonos gear IP's thru this method, but I want then to play streams off the web so I do not block the gateway.
Most residential grade routers will allow this, but some will limit the number you can assign.
we are running our out of days to play with a test this stuff, once they release the 8.5 you must be walled off.
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I wish Sonos would stop telling us they're "reaching out". They seem to reach just far enough to tug my chain.

Dave - I applaud your selfless stance with regard to not accepting your exceptional (as in "not the norm") offer base on 3 CR100s. I didn't pursue this when I called them before Easter, I just wanted to see if they volunteered any escalation since RyanS had previously invited me to "reach out" (yep) to them.

I've found that the CR100 cradle makes an almost perfect unpowered stand for the Huawei Mate 10 Pro. Perhaps Sonos would like to help me populate all my cradles with these large screened, splashproof android devices at £529 each since they're not offering me anything for my otherwise redundant cradles.

I've also found out that my ISP doesn't release the security details to its supplied router which only allows the most basic admin features; but I've got the rest of the week to come up with a solution even if it means disconnecting the broadband to force my kids off their PS4s. Hmmm.:?


Jeeves,
use your ISPs router just as the gateway, and add an appropriate Wi-Fi router that will do the filtering between the Gateway and your network. then you do not have to worry about your ISP.


Hmm. I saw a diagram during a search that showed a WAN socket for connecting to another router for this type of configuration, but my Mickey Mouse one doesn't have this (always wondered what this was for on my old ISP's one).

I have found access to "Port Mapping" and "Port Triggering" so I don't know if setting up some rules and then disabling them will work e.g. 4444 -> 4444 but disabled (is that the port or the "rule" though). Seems you have to do this for every Sonos IP address and I've got quite a few...

I've sent the ISP support a message but as you can probably tell I'm fumbling in the dark and their Firewall switch is a simple on/off without other options.


Jeeves,
Port mapping and triggering is typically used if you wanted to allow a specific port or service on your LAN to be available from the WEB, basically the opposite of what you are trying to do by blocking.
find a router that will give you the ability to blocked specific websites (could be considered parental controls or Content Filtering)
if you can also find the method to block specific ports (in this case 4444) from passing it would be a bonus.
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I like this snippet from the play 1 specs on Sonos Canada

https://www.sonos.com/en-ca/shop/play1.html



It's not on the UK or US sites - they must have forgotten to remove it from the Canadian one.....


so,,,,,

Software Updates = Bricking units = Making things better......

I agree, for the competition.
did not see this in the business plan.....
Hello,

I'm late into the conversation, but finally had to reply to the smooth "voice of reason/best course of action" approach that Sonos has taken to everyone who has expressed displeasure about their decision to 'kill' the CR100. When my controller ceased to charge properly about five years ago, I unscrewed the back and took the battery out, replaced the back, and then plugged it into its charger, and have used it that way ever since. No HAZARD INVOLVED. A simple solution that complements a product whose ease of use has been its greatest strength.

"We appreciate the concern and your love of the CR100, and the team has been listening to your feedback here. We’ve tried to keep our reasons for making this decision clear.

The CR100 is a unique Sonos product as it has an internal lithium ion battery, which was never intended or recommended to be replaceable. Additionally, the hardware of the CR100 has aged. As you know, it already can’t keep up with new features. For these reasons, the best course of action for CR100s is to safely dispose of them.

We strive to keep products working with core functionality for as long as possible and we’ve worked to keep the hardware running for almost a decade since it was last available for sale. We have no plans to disconnect any of our legacy players, although in the future they may not get some new features that become available on newer Sonos products."
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...we are running our out of days to play with a test this stuff, once they release the 8.5 you must be walled off.
Is this strictly true? Is it not the case that even after 8.5, users can still CHECK for updates without bricking their CR100s, as the actual update only happens if you click "Let's do this" in the update window? Click "Cancel" and nothing happens.


I strongly agree that those of us who want to keep our CR100s working need to set up protection against ACCIDENTAL updates, but I can't remember ever having had a Sonos update "pushed" on me. So all I'm saying is that CHECKING for updates doesn't automatically lead to updating.
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I wish Sonos would stop telling us they're "reaching out". They seem to reach just far enough to tug my chain.

Dave - I applaud your selfless stance with regard to not accepting your exceptional (as in "not the norm") offer base on 3 CR100s. I didn't pursue this when I called them before Easter, I just wanted to see if they volunteered any escalation since RyanS had previously invited me to "reach out" (yep) to them.

I've found that the CR100 cradle makes an almost perfect unpowered stand for the Huawei Mate 10 Pro. Perhaps Sonos would like to help me populate all my cradles with these large screened, splashproof android devices at £529 each since they're not offering me anything for my otherwise redundant cradles.

I've also found out that my ISP doesn't release the security details to its supplied router which only allows the most basic admin features; but I've got the rest of the week to come up with a solution even if it means disconnecting the broadband to force my kids off their PS4s. Hmmm.:?


Jeeves,
use your ISPs router just as the gateway, and add an appropriate Wi-Fi router that will do the filtering between the Gateway and your network. then you do not have to worry about your ISP.


Hmm. I saw a diagram during a search that showed a WAN socket for connecting to another router for this type of configuration, but my Mickey Mouse one doesn't have this (always wondered what this was for on my old ISP's one).

I have found access to "Port Mapping" and "Port Triggering" so I don't know if setting up some rules and then disabling them will work e.g. 4444 -> 4444 but disabled (is that the port or the "rule" though). Seems you have to do this for every Sonos IP address and I've got quite a few...

I've sent the ISP support a message but as you can probably tell I'm fumbling in the dark and their Firewall switch is a simple on/off without other options.


Jeeves,
not sure if this has been addressed, but one way you can look at the whole "LAN" VS "WAN" port thing is to consider that the DSL or CABLE wire coming into the ISP provided router is essentially connected to the WAN port as its on the WAN side of the router.
the LAN port is always the connections into your local private network.
So, if you have an ISP that is providing a router than does not allow for much management you can always get an additional router that will give you the required management.
Connect its WAN port to the LAN port of the ISP provided router, and then all of your network gear MUST be on the LAN side of the new Router.
Notes: If you are also Getting your Wi-Fi off the ISP provided router then you MUST disable it and setup the Wi-Fi on the new router to manage your house. You can mimic the original for ESSID and PW if you like.
You do not have to setup the ISP provided router as a bridge, if you do not the only thing to be aware of is the subnet being used on the ISP router and your personal router, they MUST be different subnets.
Years ago they all used the same subnet on the LAN side, most vendors have moved to different subnets so that may not be an issue.
hope this helps, but if you have any other questions let us know.


Thanks Steve - That was elegantly simple....until I read the next post. Haha.:D
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Nope. I would never expect a CEO to bother replying to a series of questions that were already dealt with by his subordinates. I would take the answers I've already got as definitive and final. Then again, I also do not tilt at windmills. I find the fight to be very unfulfilling.

No, i would expect, and would almost certainly get, exactly what Sonos has already provided. A response from subordinates, or a boilerplate response. You have the response, you just don't like what it says. I happen to be disgusted by the outcome of a recent election. Life ain't fair.

A response on the CEOs behalf would be the minimum I would expect as an individual customer. As a letter representing some 400+ customers I would expect a response signed/sent by the CEO (even if he didn't draft it).

I personally don't send to CEOs of large organisations expecting them to come and visit my house to personally apologise. But they do become of aware of the issue, and organisational change can happen. There are countless success stories of customer action at CEO level resulting in a change to process. This may or may not be one of them.

Chicks - As others have pointed out you think the cart goes before the horse. We haven't had a response.
JGatie - keep taking what you are given - never strive for better - great attitude for life.
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I like this snippet from the play 1 specs on Sonos Canada

https://www.sonos.com/en-ca/shop/play1.html



It's not on the UK or US sites - they must have forgotten to remove it from the Canadian one.....


so,,,,,

Software Updates = Bricking units = Making things better......

I agree, for the competition.
did not see this in the business plan.....


...but great for selling off your Sonos to Canadians. I'll book a 40' container now just in case.;)
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I think the one chap, earlier in this thread, who turned down £300 or $300 for his three old controllers (can’t recall his name or find his post now), but I think he may have missed an opportunity, but other than that, I’m sat on the fence. I appreciate he and many others will disagree with my point of view on that matter, but let’s not flame each other here over what we each may see as a reasonable and fair offer.

That was me, I don't need £300, it will make zero difference to my life. (and if they withdraw the offer the net loss would be £200).

The no CR100 route means re-training the wife and kids to use some crappy app on a cobbled together tablet that costs either £60 and looks crap or costs £300 and looks good but not part of a system. So best case is £900/spend because I don't do crap. And I have all the hassle of making it work.

Worst case is a new system. Based on current cost of Sonos that would be something like £6,000. It may be more it may be less. This will also have a learning curve attached to it.

The £300 wouldn't contribute to the above anyway and simply let me buy more Sonos Zones. The littlest doesn't have a Play 1 (so that would cost me £49). And the eldest would love a Play 5 as an upgrade. The toilet doesn't have a speaker (but bathrooms do).

To quote the mighty Jessie J:
It's not about the money money money
We don't need your money money money
We just wanna make the world dance
Forget about the price tag
Ain't about the uh cha-ching cha-ching
Ain't about the yeah b-bling b-bling
Wanna make the world dance
Forget about the price tag
We need to take it back in time
When music…

Could be controlled with a CR100 :D

Dave
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I personally don't send to CEOs of large organisations expecting them to come and visit my house to personally apologise. But they do become of aware of the issue, and organisational change can happen. There are countless success stories of customer action at CEO level resulting in a change to process. This may or may not be one of them.


Ahem....
https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/11-times-it-paid-to-complain-directly-to-the-ceo.html

Just sayin'...
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My CR100 has sat happily charging in a cradle for over 10 years, and is the go to device in my household (as in many others) for default control of my Sonos system, bby all users (and those not so tech savvy) and can I add one of the reasons for my initial purchase

Yes I have a smartphone, yes I have the App, and yes I can control my system (although not as instinctively) from there

But if it is the (slightly ambigious) case that the potential battery issue is a reason for needing to dispose of the CR100 then why can it not be the case that, you just block updates to that particular device, in order that we as users and supporters of the sonos product base for many many years can choose for ourselves whether to continue, whilst still able to benefit from upgrades across the rest of the system:@:@
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You can always leave router in standard mode and connect another router to it. You then control what passes in/out of the second router. Technically packets are being handled twice but I doubt you would notice the speed difference. Technically you would be double NAT'd but unless you need to allow outside traffic in (e.g. VOIP) then it shouldn't be an issue.
Hi Dave, I'm one of those with limited control of my VDSL modem/router, so I'm interested in this.

I can’t switch my router to bridge mode, nor can I switch off DHCP. Just to be clear, are you saying I can put a second router behind this one without causing problems? You mention VOIP - I use Skype a good deal, so would that be a problem?

I am using Parental Controls to guard my main Sonos system against CR100 theft and a firewall for the system in my holiday home, but I can't block ports on either, so adding a second router with more control might offer more protection.


Skype was heavily queried in the early days as it had a way round double NAT - everyone thought it was a hack. When you login Skype connects to a super node (a server) so is effectively an outbound connection that is maintained. It may shift from UDP to TCP which would be lower priority packets so a loss of quality may result - many say not.

Port forwarding at the ISP router could probably be used to avoid double NAT. It may also be possible to use a router just as a firewall (or buy a dedicated firewall) with NAT disabled to sit between the router and your network.

A firewall that doesn't block ports sounds like a chocolate tea pot.

But effectively the WAN port of the internal router just connects to the LAN port of the ISP router. So make sure you buy a router with a WAN port connection not just an ADSL connection.
Draytek 2860 has both ADSL2 and WAN connections & 6 LAN ports
Draytek 2925 has 2 WAN ports (2 incoming connections) and 5 LAN port (internal connection)

You can likely get something far cheaper if you don't need the load balancing and failover stuff. Netgear higher end stuff did most of this stuff far easier than Draytek. Or if you like technical stuff look up DD-WRT.

DD-WRT
This puts new firmware on the router and lets you do all sorts of stuff. We have a couple of old Linksys routers with this installed to allow them to act as wireless bridges (gives us a wired ethernet port to connect remote IoT stuff like PV inverters) that connects to our WiFi network. Out of range for Sonos and the routers were second hand and £20. With DD-WRT they could equally be set-up as main routers.
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I think the one chap, earlier in this thread, who turned down £300 or $300 for his three old controllers (can’t recall his name or find his post now), but I think he may have missed an opportunity, but other than that, I’m sat on the fence. I appreciate he and many others will disagree with my point of view on that matter, but let’s not flame each other here over what we each may see as a reasonable and fair offer.

That was me, I don't need £300, it will make zero difference to my life. (and if they withdraw the offer the net loss would be £200).

The no CR100 route means re-training the wife and kids to use some crappy app on a cobbled together tablet that costs either £60 and looks crap or costs £300 and looks good but not part of a system. So best case is £900/spend because I don't do crap. And I have all the hassle of making it work.

Worst case is a new system. Based on current cost of Sonos that would be something like £6,000. It may be more it may be less. This will also have a learning curve attached to it.

The £300 wouldn't contribute to the above anyway and simply let me buy more Sonos Zones. The littlest doesn't have a Play 1 (so that would cost me £49). And the eldest would love a Play 5 as an upgrade. The toilet doesn't have a speaker (but bathrooms do).

To quote the mighty Jessie J:
It's not about the money money money
We don't need your money money money
We just wanna make the world dance
Forget about the price tag
Ain't about the uh cha-ching cha-ching
Ain't about the yeah b-bling b-bling
Wanna make the world dance
Forget about the price tag
We need to take it back in time
When music…

Could be controlled with a CR100 :D

Dave

What he said!!
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...we are running our out of days to play with a test this stuff, once they release the 8.5 you must be walled off.
Is this strictly true? Is it not the case that even after 8.5, users can still CHECK for updates without bricking their CR100s, as the actual update only happens if you click "Let's do this" in the update window? Click "Cancel" and nothing happens.


I strongly agree that those of us who want to keep our CR100s working need to set up protection against ACCIDENTAL updates, but I can't remember ever having had a Sonos update "pushed" on me. So all I'm saying is that CHECKING for updates doesn't automatically lead to updating.


But as soon as the apps are aware of an upgrade they seem to be operate a limited feature set.

Auto updates of the app will result in the App having a mismatched version and refusing to communicate with the system. Turning off auto-updates is a security risk (according to Apple), and a PIA, 2 iPads, 3 iPhones, iTouch all requiring manual update of 100s of apps isn't a solution.

Plus we have had zero chance to test what happens as Sonos have given us a short window to prepare. The notice period given is appalling.
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Just to stick my tuppence ha'penny in...

jgatie, chicks

Since you two are obviously happy just to accept things without question, I'll not bother arguing this much further except to say that it is common business decency to reply when a customer makes contact. It's called customer services.

Yes, I do not expect a personal reply from Patrick Spence - he is probably too busy checking the petty cash tin to see what chunk of Spotify he can afford.

However, Mike Carlino's contact details are clearly published on the Sonos website. He is the Director of global customer care.

If he is openly inviting contact, then one would expect a reply (whether from him or a subordinate)

Further, if he was one of my directors, I would have had a word by now given the discontent evident on this forum

Is 7 days too optimistic to expect any sort of reply? In my opinion, no. 48 hours, tops.

To make things easy, I shall condense "the letter" below:

-------
Hi Patrick,

Please can you release some legacy software so that we can keep using our CR100s?

Thanks

John
-------

Have we been invited to "reach out" by Sonos (I'm getting warm again) - Yes we were.

Has that question been answered (or any other of the questions asked here) - No they have not.
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A firewall that doesn't block ports sounds like a chocolate tea pot.
Well, that's what both of my subscription routers are. They allow only URL blocking.
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...as soon as the apps are aware of an upgrade they seem to be operate a limited feature set...Auto updates of the app will result in the App having a mismatched version and refusing to communicate with the system. Turning off auto-updates is a security risk (according to Apple), and a PIA, 2 iPads, 3 iPhones, iTouch all requiring manual update of 100s of apps isn't a solution.
Agree - which is why I have deleted all Sonos apps and installed SonoPad & SonoPhone apps instead.

It's a total disgrace for Sonos to leave its customers to resort to jumping through all these hoops just to protect our property. But boy, I hope I'm right to assume that they have not stooped to the level of punishing us for just CHECKING for updates.
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A firewall that doesn't block ports sounds like a chocolate tea pot.
Well, that's what both of my subscription routers are. They allow only URL blocking.


OK - I guess they are offering a partial firewall function. Would be interesting to test using IP address rather than URL. It may be possible to circumvent the block. But they may well block all IP connections and allow only URL based ones. I would guess a VPN tunnel straight out would allow anything to pass (if the firewall allows VPNs outbound).

But blocking the urls is enough for Sonos. I believe blocking port 4444 is not required to stop updates.
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...as soon as the apps are aware of an upgrade they seem to be operate a limited feature set...Auto updates of the app will result in the App having a mismatched version and refusing to communicate with the system. Turning off auto-updates is a security risk (according to Apple), and a PIA, 2 iPads, 3 iPhones, iTouch all requiring manual update of 100s of apps isn't a solution.
Agree - which is why I have deleted all Sonos apps and installed SonoPad & SonoPhone apps instead.

It's a total disgrace for Sonos to leave its customers to resort to jumping through all these hoops just to protect our property. But boy, I hope I'm right to assume that they have not stooped to the level of punishing us for just CHECKING for updates.


Aha - Sometimes the simple is overlooked. And not pointed out by the forum experts Chicks & Jgatie as a solution.

I will be uninstalling the Sonos App from all this evening and slotting in SonoPAd & SonoPhone.

Cheers
Dave
TJRL/F00tS0re,

I obviously think slightly differently to each of you. I am seeing the alternative potential scenario for you, in that it is still quite possible that the old CR100’s you each own, could naturally 'bite the dust' anyway due to their now ageing components and that could well happen (quite easily) in the not too distant future.

If that were to happen, I doubt you would then suddenly consider scrapping and replacing your entire Sonos system. You would most likely accept the controllers natural 'demise' due to age and start to look around for an alternative controller available within today’s market and I think you would agree to pay for the new replacement device out of your own pocket. That’s certainly what I would do too.

So natural demise of hardware due to old age is usually seen by the majority as being 'acceptable', but forced obsolescence, even though these devices are approaching their 'end of life' period, is now causing you both to think in an entirely different way.

Even if you go onto block your ports and prevent updates, it will never protect you or any user who later suffers a CR100 natural hardware failure in the future. The old age of the CR100 components infer such a failure is now (probably) reasonably-likely and that failure maybe just around the corner.

I really do see that type of natural hardware failure as being 'more likely' these days, as the devices have certainly gone well past their expected usability date. So my (easy) choice was to weigh up the pros and cons of that 'natural failure' aspect and it led me to conclude that I would rather exchange my ageing controller for a voucher right now, rather than live with the hope that the components continue to work for many years to come... that’s why I disagree with F00tS0re for not taking the offer of $300/£300 ... it’s not about the money, I agree. It’s about looking at the most sensible course of action to take in the known overall circumstance. The controllers are likely to fail eventually anyway, perhaps in the not too distant future and that failure might well be just around the corner for you, so that’s why I would exchange them ...and I think the Sonos offer of £100/$100 per controller to you, was a very fair offer indeed.

Your CR100 controllers could fail at anytime and if and when they do, you will receive, absolutely nothing, zilch, nowt, zero... not a single penny/cent for them.. but all that aside you will still then be in the same position where you find yourselves needing to find and buy another type of Sonos system controller.
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I will be uninstalling the Sonos App from all this evening and slotting in SonoPAd & SonoPhone.

Cheers
Dave


Done the same here, but I have kept one instance of the official desktop controller on my PC 'just in case' I need to do something not supported by the 3rd party apps. I've turned off "check for updates" in the Sonos app settings, and I have also installed a 3rd party windows controller app from the MS store for day-to-day use. This is of course in addition to blocking all the previously mentioned URLs and port 4444. All of my controllers do now report an "unable to connect" in response to any attempt to "check for update" manually... 🙂
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TJRL/F00tS0re,

I obviously think slightly differently to each of you. I am seeing the alternative potential scenario for you, in that it is still quite possible that the old CR100’s you each own, could naturally 'bite the dust' anyway due to their now ageing components and that could well happen (quite easily) in the not too distant future.


I don't disagree that they could 'bite the dust' in the near future, or indeed the far future. We should also remember they are only a set of electronic components strapped to a printed circuit board. So the failure could be just a small component that someone out there may be able to fix for next to nothing.

I can see an advantage in taking the cash and keeping the controller and blocking the updates. However, for those of us that want to keep the old CR100 running, I think the fact we want to opt out of future updates should be a choice that Sonos acts upon. They should, at the time we tell them, become responsible for preventing the wanton destruction of the equipment we have paid good money for. That is, they should actively exclude us from updates, rather than expecting non IT experts to actively seek out methods that will hopefully prevent destruction of our property.



However, Mike Carlino's contact details are clearly published on the Sonos website. He is the Director of global customer care.

If he is openly inviting contact, then one would expect a reply (whether from him or a subordinate)


I have indeed contacted Mike and I did indeed get a prompt reply which was in line with good customer service practice.
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I have not had a chance to check the following out, but I know that there are other software solutions for controlling Sonos equipment, probably of varying quality. From my own limited experience (Andronos), the firmware version of the underlying equipment does not appear to be an issue (i.e. they do not all need to be aligned to a specific version).

I tried this out when bringing some of my equipment up to V8.4 by just plugging them in and then opening the non Sonos App. It found ALL my devices irrespective of the fact they were on different versions.

Perhaps for adding equipment in the future, alternative software could be used to control those new devices without having to upgrade the rest of the system, that is, plug them in and run them through an alternative app. I know that means they would be outside the scope of the CR100, but just wondering if that would work - a sort of psuedo Sonos V1/Sonos V2 sceranio.