Does Sonos have any plan to allow its Users (Customers) to PASSWORD-PROTECT control of the App?

  • 30 November 2021
  • 10 replies
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Does Sonos have any plan to allow its Users (Customers) to PASSWORD-PROTECT control of the App?

This question has come up repeatedly from Sonos Customers, going back now over 8 years(!), yet it is always ignored by SONOS, or some diversion answer is given like “change your router” ...”hide your internet router password” ...”stop your guests using your internet” ...etc ...none of which truly solves the problem; a problem that I’m sure with all the tech expertise that SONOS has, just to simply password protect the app.

Here’s a quick real example of how allowing access to my SONOS system by anyone with a SONOS app can be ...we had some friends staying.  We didn’t give them access to our Sonos but they downloaded the SONOS app. Logged into our wi-fi (which of course I would give them as they need internet access for emails, etc) and they started using out SONOS at their whim. But it goes on - their son in another country logged into their Spotify, and started playing heavy rock, which (you guessed it), their SONOS app was hooked up to our system and bang! A load of very unhappy neighbours!!

C’mon SONOS - a fairly simple request ...allow your valuable Users/Customers to password-protect our own SONOS system, after all we’re the ones who paid for it ...not all those with access to a free SONOS app!!


10 replies

Setting up a guest network; allowing them only internet access, would solve every scenario in your example, in addition to keeping these “friends” off your local LAN. 

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Why did you not just give them guest wifi?  

Surely to the above ‘diversion answers’ should be added “shun such impolite so-called friends that so abuse one’s hospitality”...

By the way you didn’t actually need to grant access to your WiFi assuming it was just for the occasional email. Most people have 4G (or better) on their phones. 

As for the son in another country he couldn’t possibly access your Sonos system from the outside. Someone who had been on your network and used Spotify Connect could in theory continue to play music after leaving the WiFi, until such time as something else was played on the speaker in question, but no-one can simply invade.

Setting up a guest network; allowing them only internet access, would solve every scenario in your example, in addition to keeping these “friends” off your local LAN. 

I sincerely appreciate all the replies so far but you’re all kinda missing the point.

Firstly, we like a lot of folks don’t have a straightforward network that can simply “add guest wifi”. We have a complicated network system with two routers, with different SSIDs, across nine rooms, plus extenders, so setting up a Guest wi-fi is like replacing the car engine when all it really needs is a new oil filter!

Secondly, I know the DIY work-arounds, as you’ve mentioned, but surely we as the paying customers of SONOS, who keep them in business, should not need to find a solution to their product which we’ve spent good money on buying, and has been a functionality feature that’s been well requested for over 8 years, simply because SONOS can’t be bothered to add password-protection functionality to their app.

How come all other apps like soundcloud, spotify, amazon, etc all see the importance to add password-protection, yet SONOS don’t? Call me cynical but maybe it’s because SONOS can’t monetize the app (like those I mentioned) so why should they bother?  But paying customers would like it, that’s why they should bother :-)

Surely to the above ‘diversion answers’ should be added “shun such impolite so-called friends that so abuse one’s hospitality”...

By the way you didn’t actually need to grant access to your WiFi assuming it was just for the occasional email. Most people have 4G (or better) on their phones. 

As for the son in another country he couldn’t possibly access your Sonos system from the outside. Someone who had been on your network and used Spotify Connect could in theory continue to play music after leaving the WiFi, until such time as something else was played on the speaker in question, but no-one can simply invade.

So your friends come around your place and you say “nope, sorry you can’t use my wi-fi, use your own 4G” ...lol, yeah, right.  :relaxed:

...and re-read what I explained happened with Spotify and Sonos, and you might then understand that a) it’s totally possible, and b) it happened!

Setting up a guest network; allowing them only internet access, would solve every scenario in your example, in addition to keeping these “friends” off your local LAN. 

I sincerely appreciate all the replies so far but you’re all kinda missing the point.

Firstly, we like a lot of folks don’t have a straightforward network that can simply “add guest wifi”. We have a complicated network system with two routers, with different SSIDs, across nine rooms, plus extenders, so setting up a Guest wi-fi is like replacing the car engine when all it really needs is a new oil filter!

 

 

None of that precludes setting up a guest network.  It’s a built-in feature for the vast majority of routers and doesn’t care a whit what your LAN settings are.  Even better, if you truly have two routers, since Sonos doesn’t cross subnets, give your guests the password to the router which isn’t hosting Sonos.  Problem solved. 

 

 


Secondly, I know the DIY work-arounds, as you’ve mentioned, but surely we as the paying customers of SONOS, who keep them in business, should not need to find a solution to their product which we’ve spent good money on buying, and has been a functionality features well requested for over 8 years, imply because SONOS can’t be bothered to add password-protection functionality to their app.



How come all other apps like soundcloud, spotify, amazon, etc all see the importance to add password-protection, yet SONOS don’t? Call me cynical but maybe it’s because SONOS can’t monetize the app (like those I mentioned) so why should they bother?  But paying customers would like it, that’s why they should bother :-)

 

If you saw the hundreds of pages of complaints when Sonos started requiring a password simply to add a new device, even thought this was to protect the user from outside hacks, you would understand.  Yeah, yeah, we know - “Make it optional” - but that’s not the point.  There are other issues at hand here, and a guest network is the simple, easy, and effective answer for all users wanting this functionality. 

So your friends come around your place and you say “nope, sorry you can’t use my wi-fi, use your own 4G” ...lol, yeah, right.  :relaxed:

...and re-read what I explained happened with Spotify and Sonos, and you might then understand that a) it’s totally possible, and b) it happened!

 

I have never given my guests access to my Wi-Fi, ever. It’s just not necessary today.  And even if I did, the first moron that took control of my Sonos like your friend did would be out on his keister.  

Surely to the above ‘diversion answers’ should be added “shun such impolite so-called friends that so abuse one’s hospitality”...

By the way you didn’t actually need to grant access to your WiFi assuming it was just for the occasional email. Most people have 4G (or better) on their phones. 

As for the son in another country he couldn’t possibly access your Sonos system from the outside. Someone who had been on your network and used Spotify Connect could in theory continue to play music after leaving the WiFi, until such time as something else was played on the speaker in question, but no-one can simply invade.

So your friends come around your place and you say “nope, sorry you can’t use my wi-fi, use your own 4G” ...lol, yeah, right.  :relaxed:

...and re-read what I explained happened with Spotify and Sonos, and you might then understand that a) it’s totally possible, and b) it happened!

 

I also have a network with multiple routers, multiple SSIDs, and additional APs. Visitors are confined to a subnet which has only a couple of ‘guest’ speakers on it. The main system is on a separate subnet, out of the way. 

As it happens, often as not I have to ask visitors whether they need WiFi access at all, since many are happy with their phone’s cellular connection. 

 

On the Spotify question it’s simply impossible for an interloper out on the internet to access a Sonos system, unless of course they have help from someone on the inside.

How come all other apps like soundcloud, spotify, amazon, etc all see the importance to add password-protection, yet SONOS don’t? Call me cynical but maybe it’s because SONOS can’t monetize the app (like those I mentioned) so why should they bother?  But paying customers would like it, that’s why they should bother :-)

 

Music services are password protected because they are cloud based services, not hardware you own sitting on your own protected WiFi network.  In either case though, the app itself is free, it’s the service or hardware that you are buying.7  

And I don’t think music service password-protect your accounts primarily access to the service per customer demand, but to help prevent customers from sharing their accounts with others, cutting into their profits.  Seriously, if customers wanted an option to remove password restriction on their Amazon music account, Amazon would surely tell them no.  Yes, Amazon and others can track what devices you use and limit access that way, but password restriction is added protection.

Also worth noting that for a music service, you generally don’t need to provide a password every time you access the service, the password is saved...device is authorized to access the account.  The music service now relies on your devices security.   In a similar way, you would do the initial setup on home network,  and Sonos now relies on your network security.  Really, people should look at giving out the password to their WiFi network the same way they do about giving out the password to unlock their phone...IMO.

@mitch123 .  Even if the Spotify Connect thing happened (and I think you must have misinterpreted), SPOTIFY CONNECT DOES NOT USE THE SONOS APP.  So password protecting the app would have zero effect on this. 

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