Constant Updates REALLY ANNOYING



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[...] My experience with Echo Dots is different; I have a feeling it updates even more frequently, but I never know when it is doing that, so I don't care. Does Sonos have an option to be as intervention free as that where updates are concerned? From seeing the need to input my Mac password in the Sonos controller update process, I think not.
Yes, by enabling automatic firmware updates.

https://support.sonos.com/s/article/225?language=en
Nahh, won't work where my desktop controller is concerned, like I said in the sentence immediately following the highlighted one quoted. Which, unlike many, I happen to use more often than any other. I have a desktop controller for Amazon Music as well for the auto updating Dots that does not need any intervention because it is cloud based.
Nahh, won't work where my desktop controller is concerned, like I said in the sentence immediately following the highlighted one quoted. Which, unlike many, I happen to use more often than any other. I have a desktop controller for Amazon Music as well for the auto updating Dots that does not need any intervention because it is cloud based.
As I wrote, the automatic updates are ONLY for the firmware of the speakers.

My Amazon Music desktop controller requires my intervention, by the way.
How does it become automatic then if I need to take actions to update the controller which otherwise won't function and neither then will the system? Unless desktop controller users are no longer part of the Sonos universe.
My Amazon music controller is a URL to which I am permanently signed in, so I certainly don't have to make any interventions whenever it or the hardware updates, without my even knowing that it has. Now that is how I define "automatic".
[...] My Amazon music controller is a URL to which I am permanently signed in, so I certainly don't have to make any interventions whenever it or the hardware updates, without my even knowing that it has. Now that is how I define "automatic".
Don't know on a Mac but on Windows an Update notification similar to the Sonos Desktop Controller is being displayed in the Amazon Music PC application which I have to confirm in order to start the update process.
URL behaviour should not depend on client; you must be using a desktop app. I don't see anything that the app can do that the URL can't.
URL behaviour should not depend on client; you must be using a desktop app. I don't see anything that the app can do that the URL can't.
Yes, I do. Are you referring to the web browser version of Amazon Music?
Yes.
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One thing that's worth mentioning is that the annoyance factor climbs in proportion to the number of devices that are/can be used to control the system. In our situation, we have multiple desktops and multiple mobile devices that are in use, and we do not have the option of limiting it to one device. So, at any given time, there's more than a half dozen computers/devices all saying, "Hey, I need an update! Update me, update me, update me!!" And if I put duct tape over their mouths to quiet them, eventually they juts stop working, requiring ........an update.

There is simply no need for Sonos to be updating their software every few weeks. They're boxes that play music - that's it. I don't care if they have refurbished, surplus Cray II supercomputers from the mid 80s in them, they still just play music. No matter how you dress it up, that's all they do. 7 years ago, My Sonos system did EXACTLY what it does now, it just did so without constantly harassing me to update it.
One thing that's worth mentioning is that the annoyance factor climbs in proportion to the number of devices that are/can be used to control the system. In our situation, we have multiple desktops and multiple mobile devices that are in use, and we do not have the option of limiting it to one device. So, at any given time, there's more than a half dozen computers/devices all saying, "Hey, I need an update! Update me, update me, update me!!" And if I put duct tape over their mouths to quiet them, eventually they juts stop working, requiring ........an update.

There is simply no need for Sonos to be updating their software every few weeks. They're boxes that play music - that's it. I don't care if they have refurbished, surplus Cray II supercomputers from the mid 80s in them, they still just play music. No matter how you dress it up, that's all they do. 7 years ago, My Sonos system did EXACTLY what it does now, it just did so without constantly harassing me to update it.

Buy yourself an old school HiFi system with cables and no internet connection, and that therefore can't madden you with constant firmware improvements.
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I wonder if there could be some sort of compromise where the desktop is updated less frequently than the mobile apps and firmware. I would think that most updates would be fine, with the exception of additional products (in some cases) or significant new features, an older version of the desktop would work with the current firmware of the speakers.

Of course, that's a broad assumption that may not be true. And it could end up causing more confusion than it's worth, keeping track of what version is compatible with what and very support issues it could cause.

Maybe another compromise could be a secondary version of the desktop (or perhaps a URL) that only uses Sonos existing APIs. Since the APIs will not change nearly as frequently, users could use this application instead of the full (fuller?) version of the desktop for normal operations.

I don't have the same frustration as others users do, since I rarely use the desktop app. It's probably a couple versions behind right now. It's actually becoming rather rare to use the moble app as well, since I do most operation by voice these days.
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One thing that's worth mentioning is that the annoyance factor climbs in proportion to the number of devices that are/can be used to control the system. In our situation, we have multiple desktops and multiple mobile devices that are in use, and we do not have the option of limiting it to one device. So, at any given time, there's more than a half dozen computers/devices all saying, "Hey, I need an update! Update me, update me, update me!!" And if I put duct tape over their mouths to quiet them, eventually they juts stop working, requiring ........an update.

There is simply no need for Sonos to be updating their software every few weeks. They're boxes that play music - that's it. I don't care if they have refurbished, surplus Cray II supercomputers from the mid 80s in them, they still just play music. No matter how you dress it up, that's all they do. 7 years ago, My Sonos system did EXACTLY what it does now, it just did so without constantly harassing me to update it.

Buy yourself an old school HiFi system with cables and no internet connection, and that therefore can't madden you with constant firmware improvements.


If I hadn't invested thousands of dollars in a system that used to work just fine, I might consider that.
Turn on automatic updates for the firmware, schedule it for 'Overnight', ...
https://support.sonos.com/s/article/225?language=en

... also enable auto updates in the respective app store - that's it!
Turn on automatic updates for the firmware, schedule it for 'Overnight', ...
https://support.sonos.com/s/article/225?language=en

... also enable auto updates in the respective app store - that's it!

And what does he do with the many desktops he uses for system control?
Turn on automatic updates for the firmware, schedule it for 'Overnight', ...
https://support.sonos.com/s/article/225?language=en

... also enable auto updates in the respective app store - that's it!

And what does he do with the many desktops he uses for system control?

It's not that hard to click "Update now" or whatever it is called in English.
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Seems like the OP's expectations for Sonos' product line to be less updated is not in accordance with the very technology Sonos primarily supports and promotes.

As has been stated, Sonos' older lines were less dependent on updates so they operate in large part the way the OP prefers -- as more of a stand-alone, set it and forget it system.

Today, the industry (in part) demands much more from internet-based music systems. Sonos has done their part to stay competitive in a market segment that beckons companies like themselves to innovate far more frequently than previous years.

In summary, you either embrace the direction of more frequent updates and the benefits of them -- or you sell off your existing product line that's more dependent on said firmware upgrades and opt for the older (equally impressive sounding) Sonos speaker offerings.

In my opinion, the OP and the most recent product line (based on their explicit expectations) is a marriage that will inevitably lead in divorce, if not at least endless disappointment.
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In summary, you either embrace the direction of more frequent updates and the benefits of them -- or you sell off your existing product line that's more dependent on said firmware upgrades and opt for the older (equally impressive sounding) Sonos speaker offerings.


This isn't really how it works. Sonos will require the firmware and application updates regardless of the age of the Sonos products you own. You can opt to turn off automatic updates and/or notifications that a new update is available, but Sonos doesn't offer support if your system isn't updated to the current version. Also, you won't be able to add any new products, old or new, to your setup if you are not on the current version.
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I understand that, Danny. But the OP seems to not want to disable updates, and the older line doesn't have the same frequency.

Honestly, this thread seems more like a place to blow hot air than anything else (which could be fine, I suppose) because plenty of advice has been offered, none of which seems to want to be followed.

It's taken on more the shape of a megaphone to simply broadcast to Sonos that they update too much, which (in effect) isn't really going to make a difference. But I believe the OP understands this, and still wants a place for their voice to be heard whether or not it actually leads to change.

Some might say what's the point, and I might be inclined to agree, but I am only one person. And I also don't have any authority to effect the type of change being requested.

Edit: to add that actually the OP has remained rather quiet on the issue, but plenty have spoken up in their stead
I understand that, Danny. But the OP seems to not want to disable updates, and the older line doesn't have the same frequency. [...]
... in being updated, you mean? All products, old and new, are running the same firmware built, otherwise the multiroom concept won't work out. For example, it would be impossible to group speakers that are running different firmware versions.
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OK, I see Danny's point (and yours) now, and stand corrected. Cheers!

I understand that, Danny. But the OP seems to not want to disable updates, and the older line doesn't have the same frequency. [...]
... in being updated, you mean? All products, old and new, are running the same firmware built, otherwise the multiroom concept won't work out. For example, it would be impossible to group speakers that are running different firmware versions.
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Honestly, this thread seems more like a place to blow hot air than anything else (which could be fine, I suppose) because plenty of advice has been offered, none of which seems to want to be followed.

It's taken on more the shape of a megaphone to simply broadcast to Sonos that they update too much, which (in effect) isn't really going to make a difference. But I believe the OP understands this, and still wants a place for their voice to be heard whether or not it actually leads to change.


Agreed. It's not uncommon, and not necessarily a bad thing to vent frustration. And there is some merit to the argument that 'the squeaky wheel gets the grease" so it's better to complain in hopes you'll get what you want (even in cases where it's not so logical) rather than just be frustrated in silence.

You can't blame folks for trying to offer solutions/work arounds to the issue, but that's not always what people are really looking for.
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Turn on automatic updates for the firmware, schedule it for 'Overnight', ...
https://support.sonos.com/s/article/225?language=en

... also enable auto updates in the respective app store - that's it!

And what does he do with the many desktops he uses for system control?

It's not that hard to click "Update now" or whatever it is called in English.


Yes, it is, when "update now" appears on a couple of dozen machines, at various times, and the entire system is down for several minutes, followed by numerous speaker dropouts that require individual attention. If Sonos would simply organize their updates a little more intelligently, instead of rapid firing them off like kids playing paintball, the platform would make a lot more sense.

There is no need for updates ever couple of weeks. If it doesn't interfere with your workflow, you need to expand your horizons a bit and realize that not everyone works off of one device or machine. It changes nothing, however - the updates come too frequently and there is ZERO reason for it.
[...] Yes, it is, when "update now" appears on a couple of dozen machines, at various times, and the entire system is down for several minutes, followed by numerous speaker dropouts that require individual attention. If Sonos would simply organize their updates a little more intelligently, instead of rapid firing them off like kids playing paintball, the platform would make a lot more sense.
The system's not working in Bluetooth-style, the Sonos app is merely a remote control rather than a media player. Updating an App doesn't stop the playback, if the firmware of the speakers has already been updated.
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[...] Yes, it is, when "update now" appears on a couple of dozen machines, at various times, and the entire system is down for several minutes, followed by numerous speaker dropouts that require individual attention. If Sonos would simply organize their updates a little more intelligently, instead of rapid firing them off like kids playing paintball, the platform would make a lot more sense.
The system's not working in Bluetooth-style, the Sonos app is merely a remote control rather than a media player. Updating an App doesn't stop the playback, if the firmware of the speakers has already been updated.


Well, be that as it may, since we've turned off automatic updates, the app will eventually lock out the user, forcing an update, which then necessitates everyone running around like lunatics to reconnect the few mystery speakers that lose connection during the update. Now, I'm fully aware that that is a network issue, not Sonos, but it does nothing to change the fact that if the updates weren't coming out so frequently, the issue would not be a problem.

I opened a desktop version today, that hadn't been used in a while, and was greeted with a "An update is available" message, which then harassed me into updating. Joy. Now it functions so much better than it did yesterday. Oh wait, no it doesn't.
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we've turned off automatic updates, the app will eventually lock out the user, forcing an update


....So you turned it off in the application itself which turns off firmware updates.
Have you gone into your app store and turned off the automatic update to the actual app?

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