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Static when playing vinyl - Turntable to Pre Amp to Connect


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I moved and set up my Sonos system in my new place.  Everything is working when streaming music, with no issues, but when I play vinyl, the sound is coming through my Sonos system has lots of static.  I remember having this issue when I initially connected a turntable to my system, but I can’t remember how I fixed it.  

Does anyone have any advice?

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Best answer by Jean C. 17 May 2020, 19:56

Hello @Lanceito44,

Have you tried testing your line in source with a non analog source like a phone or a dvd player to rule out the record itself, the needle or the pre-amp as the source of the static? 

Have you also made sure that all of the cable connections are firm and free of dust?

Our support page for using line in has some tips for adjusting the compression settings and the vinyl specific page may also have some pointers for you. 

If you are still experiencing static, distortion or skipping not related to the record itself, please submit a diagnostic report and include the confirmation number in your response so that we can take a peek for you.

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Hello @Lanceito44,

Have you tried testing your line in source with a non analog source like a phone or a dvd player to rule out the record itself, the needle or the pre-amp as the source of the static? 

Have you also made sure that all of the cable connections are firm and free of dust?

Our support page for using line in has some tips for adjusting the compression settings and the vinyl specific page may also have some pointers for you. 

If you are still experiencing static, distortion or skipping not related to the record itself, please submit a diagnostic report and include the confirmation number in your response so that we can take a peek for you.

I’m not sure what you mean by “static”. Is this static present before the stylus touches the record?

Make sure that the stylus force is correct --- things happen during a move. You should also make sure that the stylus is still intact.

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Thanks for the help.  I was able to figure out the issue.  I adjusted the weight on the arm and the static sound, when playing records, went away.  When I set up the turntable, there was too much weight on towards the front of the arm.

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Hello @Lanceito44, I’m glad you got that sorted out.

I have had the opposite problem where I don’t have enough weight on the arm and have had to weight the arm to improve the performance (read:dimes&tape) which I wouldn’t recommend these days as you can damage your records and prematurely wear out the needle. 

Feel free to reach back out if you have any other questions or concerns with your Sonos system.    

Old school arm, if you can tape dimes to it. I know, I used to do that too, but ended up with a device that wouldn’t allow me to. Had to adjust the weight of the arm in the prescribed manner as suggested in the manual of the turntable. Heresy, I tell you!

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I had this antique hi-fi consul that I used to drag around with me from apartment to apartment. It had two redeeming qualities that made up for its bulk and general immobility:

  1. It was free
  2. It had a 78 setting that was great for playing Black Sabbath records with.

In retrospect, it was my favorite piece of audio equipment and derived much enjoyment from it. 

 

When setting tracking force, set near the high end of the range recommended by the cartridge manufacturer. There is a tendency to assume that one should track as light as possible in an attempt to minimize record wear. Unfortunately, this is mostly backward logic. The stylus force is responsible for keeping the stylus in contact with the record surface. If the force is too low, high amplitude peaks will throw the stylus off the record surface, obviously resulting in awful sound quality, but the real shame is that, as the stylus crashes back onto the surface, it causes catastrophic record damage on a single playing. If the force is higher than required, there is an unnecessary slow erosion of the record surface.

Keep your records clean. In spite of the seemingly feather like tracking force, the pressure per unit area at the stylus contact point is quite high and dust particles will be pounded into the record surface, leaving a scar.

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@buzz,

How else are the unique pops and crackles supposed to develop if we properly maintain our records? 

LOL. In the late 70’s, I used to have a record that had a very distinct pop at one place. I still can click my tongue in the same place, although I’ve been listening to a CD of that recording since the 80s.

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I found moving to remastered media jarringly clean after growing up with so much analog content. This is not limited to records, we had taped copies of records that I continued to listen to decades later, VHS copies of laser-disk movies (LD from the early 80s certainly skipped) left me expecting hiccups and blurts where there were none to be had. Sometimes there is something to be said in favor of imperfection. 

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