Question

Home network and Boost

  • 8 November 2019
  • 6 replies
  • 134 views

Badge +2

I’m thinking of adding a Boost to my Sonos system to reduce the load on my TP-Link Deco mesh wifi setup, but had a couple of questions - hope someone can clear my mental fog!

The first is: Does separating off the Sonos system from the rest of the busy household’s wifi traffic make much of a difference, in practice? I’ve got a Play 5, Beam, Connect, a Play and two Play 1s on the go around the house.

The second is: Once I’ve got my Sonos system running via the Boost, do I have to switch my devices to a new Boost network to control things or will the Sonos app on my Mac and iPhone be able to communicate via the Deco network (ie without the need to switch networks on my devices every time I want to play something on Sonos)?

Hope this makes sense - thanks for any info you can offer!


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6 replies

The first is: Does separating off the Sonos system from the rest of the busy household’s wifi traffic make much of a difference, in practice? I’ve got a Play 5, Beam, Connect, a Play and two Play 1s on the go around the house.

Yes, typically. The audio traffic is carried on the SonosNet dedicated mesh. Also, grouping is likely to be more reliable than attempting to operate the system in WiFi (“wireless”) mode attached to multiple access points.

 

The second is: Once I’ve got my Sonos system running via the Boost, do I have to switch my devices to a new Boost network to control things or will the Sonos app on my Mac and iPhone be able to communicate via the Deco network (ie without the need to switch networks on my devices every time I want to play something on Sonos)?

So long as the Boost is wired to a LAN port on one of your Deco units Sonos will be on the same IP subnet. Controllers on the WiFi should therefore have no trouble finding the players.

[The Deco system can actually be put into ‘bridge mode’, meaning that a Boost could then be wired back to the main house router, but cross that bridge (pardon the pun) only if necessary.]

 

First:  In my experience, yes it does.  I tried Airplay once, and audio stuttered when streaming HD video.  I can stream multiple streams of Sonos audio and someone can be watching 4K in another room and there are no problems.  Sonos still recommends Sonosnet for anything over a few units.
 

Second: No, the Boost’s Ethernet connection bridges the Sonosnet network to you standard WiFi network.  No need to change WiFi on your devices at all.

Slow typing… jgatie and ratty are quicker. 

Badge +2

Thanks for the responses, guys! Sounds like a Boost is just what our house needs.

Really appreciate your help on this one - can’t beat the Sonos community for helpfulness and knowledgeability!

Userlevel 4
Badge +6

You may not need a boost if there is a Sonos device that you can cable to your router, or buy another Play:1 and use that as a ‘boost’. I use a Play:1 in office where router is, that is my ‘boost’

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

Something else to consider in favor of Boost Mode, with or without a Boost, is that once you have your Sonos gear off your home WiFi you can enable a lot of different options that are incompatible with Sonos operation. WiFi fairness, multiple AP channels and multiple SSIDs and probably others that escape me right now.

My recommendation is Boost mode, and to wire all Sonos devices that are easily wired to strengthen the Sonosnet mesh.