Can the Amp and Connect be told to output mono rather than stereo? Using with mono ceiling speakers in bathroom and kitchen.

  • 16 November 2012
  • 95 replies
  • 26727 views


Show first post
This topic has been closed for further comments. You can use the search bar to find a similar topic, or create a new one by clicking Create Topic at the top of the page.

95 replies

After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
So you're saying we should buy additional devices to do something Sonos could do with literally a few minutes of work? Why? 
I agree with splitting left/right into different rooms being odd, but with most in-ceiling setups you want the option for summed mono. It's really not hard, and something any serious multi-room audio system should support.
After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
I still believe that the summed-momo option should be available in software/firmware for ALL Sonos players.

However, if you are using an amp and speakers off a Sonos line output, summing the outputs to mono is simple.  Get two 1K resistors (this value is NOT critical - anything +/- 20%, or even more than that).  Put each one in series with a line output signal lead (L and R) from the Sonos, connecting the resistor leads together at the other end, and then splitting the summed output into an amp (or sending the summed output into one input of a mono amp); this should do the job nicely.  My suggestion is to have the amp nearby to the Sonos unit, but if they are separated, the resistor "network" should be closest to the amp and not the Sonos device. The output level into the amp will drop slightly but quite likely not enough to be any kind of problem.  And depending upon location, you might need/want to shield the resistor assembly somehow, using either a mini-box, some aluminum foil (either of these connected to signal-ground), or the like - this is up to you.

Tech notes:  The reason for keeping the resistors near to the amp is that the Sonos has a low-impedance output (as most devices do); you want to keep the signal cabling at its lowest-impedance for as long a distance as possible. Having the resistors nearest the Sonos device raises the impedance in the connecting cable. For a few feet this probably makes little difference. 

Almost all amps/receivers these days have high-impedance inputs.  If your amp has a low-impedance input (VERY rare), there will be some impedance mismatch and a greater volume-drop, but if it seriously affects the audio, you'll probably hear it right away.
Userlevel 1
After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
MB... Easy there buddy. I'm a professional of this industry for 30 years. I know about designing AV systems. It's not a "poor choice of equipment or lack of knowledge" although I did point out that some of these requests are not logical. Here is the bottom line: the lack of mono ability on connects is an oversight. And it isn't being addressed. I know one of the founders of Sonos and will get in touch with him directky and bring up the issue. Clearly it's going nowhere posted here. Not a single reply from anyone at Sonos.
Userlevel 1
After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
Also I know how to wire resistors inline but this is a time muncher we don't need. I'm running a company where we need to finish an install and go to the next, I don't need to be sending my guy down to the truck to grab resisters and soldering irons only to have some hack looking thing hanging off the back of my box in an organized rack. It needs to be an embedded option.
After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
Oh yes indeed. Totally agree with you. And of course, my comment was directed at those who might not know. I hope my instructions were OK - those usually work for me. Time-muncher for sure.

And thanks, Sonovo.  Always helps to have um.. connections.

The last 10% of the job takes 90% of the time (and the rest of the job takes the other  90%!).
Please add mono!
It's pretty obvious that SONOS doesn't care about its customer one little bit. 3 years, and this glaring issue has still not been fixed. What's the point of this forum if the developers don't care?
It's pretty obvious that SONOS doesn't care about its customer one little bit. 3 years, and this glaring issue has still not been fixed. What's the point of this forum if the developers don't care?

They work as designed, so there is nothing to "fix". If you want a single speaker in a room, buy a single speaker with stereo input. That is what they are made for.
Hello, The SONOS Connect and Connect Amps are stereo units. There is no setting in SONOS to currently change that. I am going to move this Questions to the Share an Idea sections. It will get submitted as a feature request for SONOS to output in Mono. This will allow other users to vote on the idea and submit this to the SONOS Product Development Team. You can try to convert the stereo signal to mono if you like, but it would not be supported. You can also check the unsupported section I searched online quickly and found this: http://www.hometech.com/hts/products/audio/converters/at-mm300.html?key=A27&pk_kwd=AT-MM300&gclid=CMCCobTZ97MCFYZM4Aod4F4AWQ

Cant find the vote site?
In the industry, many times one comes up against a wiring mistake i.e. 2 conductor in wall wire and a 0ne point stereo speaker is needed. We have to be problem solvers for these clients who tried to be wired up by the alarm guy or electrician to save a few bucks! Too late to pass additional wires. Sonos Stereo to MONO is the solution.
I don't know if this solutions will translate to everyone's setup, but you can connect the speakers in "series" to a single channel; left or right, on the connect:amp. Then, go into room setting and push the balance to the side you are using.

Just be mindful that the overall volume will be lower as the impedance will be higher on the single "circuit".

I hope this helps!
Nvm no real mono coming out, ignore my comment.
Gotta get done in the Sonos software domain. Sonos engineer-programmers, are you listening.
Good luck.
Isadore Nudell
I may need to start a new thread but thought this thread was relevant to what I am currently challenged with. In my old house I had a 6 zone Sonos system with Sonos Connect Amps powering a pair of speakers in each room. Worked great no issues and everyone in the family loved it...fast forward we just moved....in this new house we just purchased most every room has a single mono speaker wired with 2 wire from the ceiling to a wall volume control and then 4 wire (but only using one pair) going back to a central location. I was hoping to reuse my connect amps but very much NOT waning to cut drywall and run new 4 wire from each wall control to every mono speaker) do I have any options? I was also willing to replace the mono speaker with dual input stereo speaker (that would accept 4 wire, 2 pairs). The house was build in 2005 but I still can't believe they saved much money on cheaping out on the lack of 4 wire to every speaker.

After doing some research, I think the fact I dont have that 4 wire from wall switch to each speaker really limits me with at least my current equipment. If I sell all my connect Amps and buy just Connects and a multi zone amp, do I have options then? I am struggling on the stereo to mono aspect and the lack of wiring. All of these rooms would be non critical listening but would like to have different zones for my office, bedroom, kitchen, etc.

Any recommendations on what I may be able to do?
Badge
After 3 years the answers is still No. Why ? Some may ask , well it's very simple actually. Design you audio system correctly and do not ask Sonos to change their product due to your poor choices of equipment and lack of knowlegde. Anyone here who is complaining about Mono for outdoors. The correct solution is to use a connect preamp and a amplifier which can supports mono output if that's what you desire. Furthermore Sonos amps arent very powerful and suck at driving outdoor speakers in the first place. With regard to using the left output in an amplifier for one room and the right for another room. Are you people reading what you write? Your asking Sonos to basically make a 1 zone device 2 zones. It's so convoluted on many different levels. Basically because you guys are all cheap you want Sonos to reinvent the wheel for you. I'm no Sonos advocate but, they have a product for whatever you want to do. It's all there already. It's no wonder they wouldn't do this. Aside from possible limitations of design. Quit crying about this moronic feature and do it the correct way. If you want a robust outdoor speaker system your going to need amplification anyway. Get over it.
MB... Easy there buddy. I'm a professional of this industry for 30 years. I know about designing AV systems. It's not a "poor choice of equipment or lack of knowledge" although I did point out that some of these requests are not logical. Here is the bottom line: the lack of mono ability on connects is an oversight. And it isn't being addressed. I know one of the founders of Sonos and will get in touch with him directky and bring up the issue. Clearly it's going nowhere posted here. Not a single reply from anyone at Sonos.


Sonovo - I hope you did put in a request. My master bath has one speaker, and so does the bedroom. My patio has outdoor speaker. Mono output is greatly needed. Car audio amps have mono settings, let alone an expensive home audio product.
Badge
It's pretty obvious that SONOS doesn't care about its customer one little bit. 3 years, and this glaring issue has still not been fixed. What's the point of this forum if the developers don't care?

They work as designed, so there is nothing to "fix". If you want a single speaker in a room, buy a single speaker with stereo input. That is what they are made for.

I disagree. Having mono output makes it a more versatile amp. Connect amp is a great product. It's bridgeable to 4 speakers. Reading other posts, mono is highly desired by many. I'm not looking to debate others, just hoping to have this feature added.

I disagree. Having mono output makes it a more versatile amp. Connect amp is a great product. It's bridgeable to 4 speakers. Reading other posts, mono is highly desired by many. I'm not looking to debate others, just hoping to have this feature added.


Having mono output allows you to do one thing and one thing only; to use a single Connect unit where you would otherwise use two. That is not the type of "versatility" Sonos profits from. It's not rocket science to understand the economics behind this issue, nor the reason why it isn't going to be "fixed" (not that it is broken in the first place). If you want two channel output through a single speaker from a Sonos Connect/Connect:Amp, buy single stereo speakers that are fit for that purpose.
Badge

I disagree. Having mono output makes it a more versatile amp. Connect amp is a great product. It's bridgeable to 4 speakers. Reading other posts, mono is highly desired by many. I'm not looking to debate others, just hoping to have this feature added.


Having mono output allows you to do one thing and one thing only; to use a single Connect unit where you would otherwise use two. That is not the type of "versatility" Sonos profits from. It's not rocket science to understand the economics behind this issue, nor the reason why it isn't going to be "fixed" (not that it is broken in the first place). If you want two channel output through a single speaker from a Sonos Connect/Connect:Amp, buy single stereo speakers that are fit for that purpose.


I currently live in a condo rental with in ceiling speakers. One in bathroom, one in bedroom. I also have two small outdoor speakers not facing in the same direction on my patio. I have four reasons why a 4-Ohm stable amp can drive 4 speakers (8-Ohm each) with mono sound. So now I should replace 4 speakers in my rental due to a signal output setting?

I currently live in a condo rental with in ceiling speakers. One in bathroom, one in bedroom. I also have two small outdoor speakers not facing in the same direction on my patio. I have four reasons why a 4-Ohm stable amp can drive 4 speakers (8-Ohm each) with mono sound. So now I should replace 4 speakers in my rental due to a signal output setting?


I'm not sure what you want me to say. Anecdotal stories about your personal circumstances are not applicable to corporate decisions on how to maximize profits. Fact is, if Sonos allowed mono output, every installer in the world would cut costs by using a single Connect:Amp to drive 4 mono speakers in separate rooms instead of 2 Connect:Amps. Your situation doesn't change that fact.
Badge

I currently live in a condo rental with in ceiling speakers. One in bathroom, one in bedroom. I also have two small outdoor speakers not facing in the same direction on my patio. I have four reasons why a 4-Ohm stable amp can drive 4 speakers (8-Ohm each) with mono sound. So now I should replace 4 speakers in my rental due to a signal output setting?


I'm not sure what you want me to say. Anecdotal stories about your personal circumstances are not applicable to corporate decisions on how to maximize profits. Fact is, if Sonos allowed mono output, every installer in the world would cut costs by using a single Connect:Amp to drive 4 mono speakers in separate rooms instead of 2 Connect:Amps. Your situation doesn't change that fact.


By all means I am not trying to debate you or anyone else who may try to justify lack of mono function. I understand your point about "corporate greed" and selling more units. In your example, 2 Connect:Amps are NOT a solution. Even buying a dedicated amp for each speaker is not a solution, so more Connect:Amps do not help me get full sound for each zone.

By all means I am not trying to debate you or anyone else who may try to justify lack of mono function. I understand your point about "corporate greed" and selling more units. In your example, 2 Connect:Amps are NOT a solution. Even buying a dedicated amp for each speaker is not a solution, so more Connect:Amps do not help me get full sound for each zone.


Again, I'm not sure what you want me to say. Your particular circumstances are unfortunate.

By the way, one person's "corporate greed" is another person's "corporate survival". Sonos employs people too. I hear they even pay them a salary.
Badge +1

I currently live in a condo rental with in ceiling speakers. One in bathroom, one in bedroom. I also have two small outdoor speakers not facing in the same direction on my patio. I have four reasons why a 4-Ohm stable amp can drive 4 speakers (8-Ohm each) with mono sound. So now I should replace 4 speakers in my rental due to a signal output setting?


I'm not sure what you want me to say. Anecdotal stories about your personal circumstances are not applicable to corporate decisions on how to maximize profits. Fact is, if Sonos allowed mono output, every installer in the world would cut costs by using a single Connect:Amp to drive 4 mono speakers in separate rooms instead of 2 Connect:Amps. Your situation doesn't change that fact.


Sorry jgatie, but you are incorrect. Those of us who are installers would never use "a single Connect:Amp to drive 4 mono speakers in separate rooms instead of 2 Connect:Amps". Why, because separate rooms each need their volume controlled separately. It's old school to use a physical volume control and all my customers want to control the volume of each room through the Sonos App. So, like others that have posted here, having a Mono option would be extremely useful.
Regarding corporate decisions based off money: NOT adding the Mono feature is driving customers and installers to buy other solutions that are NOT Sonos products, so...
Aloha
Badge +1
The big picture: The need for Mono isn't about the number of Sonos Connect:Amps, but rather the number of speakers in a room and their configuration.
Sigh.

If driving a single speaker from a Connect:Amp is all you want, maybe you "installers" should read up on a little thing called a single point stereo speaker.
I found this. Seems like it will work.
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/pcDI--whirlwind-pcdi-2-channel-passive-a-v-direct-box
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/XRF105--hosa-xrf105-5-foot