Disgraceful Sonos Forced Upgrade Farce

  • 27 January 2020
  • 10 replies
  • 140 views

Userlevel 3

Yes i think this is greed by Sonos.  I have 15 Sonos units mainly s5 units in my house which sonos have not totally devalued to Zero.   I will now never ever buy Sonos again and would certainly not upgrade on a point of principle.  I am positive a small cheap tweek to something inside would upgrade this kit so it could still work foe decades to come.  But no greed and stupidity has taken over by Sonos

 

Sonos need to thank customers and give them discounts the more units you have in your home, not make your investment drop off a cliff edge due to greed and stupidity on their behalf. 

 

I am in total shock and disbelief if they truly get away with this lack of support on these units they have sold at great cost to us all. 


10 replies

Nobody is forcing an upgrade.  You have the option to upgrade.  You can also keep using your system exactly as it is today.   They will continue to support your system as is, with bug fixes and security updates being issued.  You just won’t get any new features. 

Userlevel 3

Nobody is forcing an upgrade.  You have the option to upgrade.  You can also keep using your system exactly as it is today.   They will continue to support your system as is, with bug fixes and security updates being issued.  You just won’t get any new features. 

 

 

They are not supporting as is….  As is, is being able to use as currently able to do so.  Should Deezer for example bring out some changes to their s/w that Sonos does not currently (as is) support then the whole system becomes defunct if the main reason for the system to to use a streaming service; which a greater number if not the majority do as each day passes.

 

Bug fixes and security updates is not functionality updates.  And as already noted, there is no reason why every but of kit needs the s/w built in for every model out there, so RAM and ROM capacity excuse simply is total rubbish a reason to give to force and upgrade scam.

 

 

 

 

They are not supporting as is….  As is, is being able to use as currently able to do so.  Should Deezer for example bring out some changes to their s/w that Sonos does not currently (as is) support then the whole system becomes defunct if the main reason for the system to to use a streaming service; which a greater number if not the majority do as each day passes.

 

 

They are supporting as is.  Your  Deezer is an example of changes, which by definition, is not ‘as is’.    I get that you may have an expectation that as Deezer changes and grows, Sonos would as well, since they always have, but thee should be some reason in that expectation.

 

I have seen others make the claim that traditional AV equipment would have a much longer life, and Sonos should to since they see them as AV products.  However, if Deezer had made a streaming change as in your example, would you expect your AV receiver to do a firmware update to accommodate in anyway?  

 

 

They are not supporting as is….  As is, is being able to use as currently able to do so.  Should Deezer for example bring out some changes to their s/w that Sonos does not currently (as is) support then the whole system becomes defunct if the main reason for the system to to use a streaming service; which a greater number if not the majority do as each day passes.

 

Bug fixes and security updates is not functionality updates.  And as already noted, there is no reason why every but of kit needs the s/w built in for every model out there, so RAM and ROM capacity excuse simply is total rubbish a reason to give to force and upgrade scam.

 

 

I could go into details as to why you are wrong, but it seems you’re pretty set in your beliefs, so I won’t bother.  

 

 

 

Userlevel 1

You’re absolutely right, it was not a forced upgrade.

 

Sonos was merely scaring users into upgrading --but hey wouldn’t be the first company to try it. Its called planned obsolescence, and it benefits the person selling the product. Obviously they used this in conjunction with a discount to encourage more sales of new hardware. Their right to do so. 100%.

 

But they have done as poorly at this as it gets. Expect this to be a case study in business school one day soon, especially if they miss earnings and shareholders are damaged as a result… Many consumers won’t be buying more Sonos, so that’s a real possibility. Don’t think so? Sonos disclosed this risk in their quarterly disclosures as a “business risk”… so Sonos knew they were engaging in “risky” behavior from the start...

 

Their CEO said it best Sonos “got it wrong” from the start” --or was that just patronizing tens of thousands of irate customers?

 

You have over 20,688 replies on a Sonos board…. wow. That’s more than 5 replies every single day for 12 years straight… I hope you are getting paid well to do so, that’s a lot of time, you’ll never get back.

And there it is, an insult about post count.  So much for a constructive conversation.

You’re absolutely right, it was not a forced upgrade.

 

Sonos was merely scaring users into upgrading --but hey wouldn’t be the first company to try it. Its called planned obsolescence, and it benefits the person selling the product. Obviously they used this in conjunction with a discount to encourage more sales of new hardware. Their right to do so. 100%.

 

 

So you’re of the opinion that there is no technical reason for the annoucement as Sonos says there is.  The old hardware with much lower specs could continue on just fine?

 

 

But they have done as poorly at this as it gets. Expect this to be a case study in business school one day soon, especially if they miss earnings and shareholders are damaged as a result… Many consumers won’t be buying more Sonos, so that’s a real possibility. Don’t think so? Sonos disclosed this risk in their quarterly disclosures as a “business risk”… so Sonos knew they were engaging in “risky” behavior from the start…

 

 

Yes, the announcement was not presented very well, and they knew that customers were not going to be happy.

 

I think business schools could talk about the messaging, but I think the more interesting aspect of this is that the multiroom smart speaker products that customers didn’t really understand (not unexepected) regarding it’s useful life, since there aren’t really other comparable products.  It is not like traditional AV products, nor like phone/tablet products that will eventually be desupporrted.

 

 

Their CEO said it best Sonos “got it wrong” from the start” --or was that just patronizing tens of thousands of irate customers?

 

You have over 20,688 replies on a Sonos board…. wow. That’s more than 5 replies every single day for 12 years straight… I hope you are getting paid well to do so, that’s a lot of time, you’ll never get back.

 

Sonos staff members are clearly marked as such.

Userlevel 2
Badge +1

Nobody is forcing an upgrade.  You have the option to upgrade.  You can also keep using your system exactly as it is today.   They will continue to support your system as is, with bug fixes and security updates being issued.  You just won’t get any new features. 

Even if this is technically true, the original email that was sent to many (most?) Sonos users was worded such that a perfectly reasonable interpretation is that of a forced upgrade. Here are some excerpts from the email I received January 21 (emphasis added):

 

Subject: Your system requires attention

In May the following products in your system will be classified as legacy and no longer receive software updates and new features. This will affect your listening experience.

You can continue using legacy products after May, but your system will no longer receive software updates and new features. Over time this is likely to disrupt access to services and overall functionality.

 

So the messaging was not simply that things will keep working “as it is today”, but rather unless you actively do something (“your system requires attention”) things will change for the worse (“this will affect your listening experience”) and eventually stop working (“disrupt access to services and overall functionality”).

Nobody is saying the messaging was anything but terrible.  It was terrible.  However, messaging is not what will keep your systems running after May 20.  Let’s hope Sonos is true to their intent, and not their message.

Subject: Your system requires attention

 

 

It’s hard to imagine a worse subject line that then above.   

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