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Watch ONLINE: After [2019] Full Movies HD


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Watch After Online Full Free “After” is a movie of first love and first times, but let’s be real, what’s most significant about the movie is that it’s based off a Harry Styles fanfiction. A young woman falls for a guy with a dark secret and the two embark on a rocky relationship. Based on the novel by Anna Todd.

Director: Jennifer Gage
With: Josephine Langford, Hero Fiennes-Tiffin, Pia Mia, Inanna Sarkis, Samuel Larsen, Dylan Arnold, Swen Temmel, Meadow Williams, Selma Blair, Peter Gallagher, Jennifer Beals.
Genre: Drama, Romance, Thriller
Duration : 106 min
Release Date: Apr 12, 2019

After is 2019 American romantic drama film directed by Jenny Gage with a screenplay by Gage, Susan McMartin and Tamara Chestna based on the 2014 new adult fiction novel of the same name written by Anna Todd. The film stars Josephine Langford as Tessa Young, a college student who begins a turbulent relationship with “bad boy” Hardin Scott, played by Hero Fiennes-Tiffin.

Anna Todd, or Imaginator1D, wrote “After” as a fanfiction series starting in 2013 on the storytelling platform Wattpad. The story existed in what is called an “alternate universe,” or AU, in which Harry Styles and fellow One Direction members were college students.

Back in my freshman year of high school, I was shamefully one of Todd’s readers, waiting patiently for her to update the series with a new chapter every few days. “After” was quite a wild phenomenon in my school. Girls would whisper about it in the bathrooms.

Let this be said — “After” does not represent all fanfictions. I, in my many years as a One Direction fan, have read some amazing works online. Teenage girls can have some amazing talent, especially when writing intricate, complex plotlines about their favorite band members. But to be clear, “After” is not a good fanfic.

In 2014, “After” was published as a book series, movie rights were acquired, Harry Styles became Hardin Scott for obvious copyright reasons, and voila, “After” hit theaters on April 12, 2019.

Here’s the basic plotline of the movie. Tessa, our female protagonist, is a book smart, innocent freshman in college who meets Hardin, a British bad boy with tattoos who wears a lot of black T-shirts. His personality is being grumpy. He’s friends with her roomate, Steph, who you can tell is rebellious because her hair is dyed pink, she wears crop tops and she listens to rock music.

In the book, Hardin is objectively a horrible character. Everyone knows this when they read “After.” The drama and absurdity is what makes the bad writing and cringey plot line so bearable. Hardin and Tessa’s relationship is absolutely emotionally abusive, with him manipulating and gaslighting her throughout the entire book.

So, it makes sense that in the movie, they would opt to make Hardin less of a terrible person. But the problem is that without Hardin being a horrible person, the movie really has no plot at all.

Hardin is rude to Tessa for maybe 15 minutes of the movie. The movie speeds through the build-up of their contentious relationship, which makes their sudden deep connection seem rushed and bizarre. They interact like, twice, and suddenly “can’t stay away from each other.”

Hardin is honestly just not mean or rebellious enough, which makes you wonder why it’s such a big deal for Tessa to be with him in the first place.

While the movie does attempt to make Hardin more likeable and less abusive, I’d prefer the movie keep Hardin’s character the same and instead make Tessa stand up for herself and realize she’s worth more. Instead, it just becomes every other cheesy romantic movie.

As the film is rated PG-13, it barely has any sex scenes, which make up at least a quarter of the book. This is odd considering the advertisements for the movie posed it as a story of a young woman’s sexual awakening.

It’s not like a movie needs sex scenes, but seriously, the book has been compared to its equally problematic cousin, “50 Shades of Grey.” The entire plot of the book was basically about Tessa losing her virginity.

The movie in general relies too heavily on clichés, and during serious parts of the movie the audience often burst into laughter. Lines such as, “You don’t ever have to cover up for me,” made me cringe so hard I had to look away from the screen.

The movie added some scenes that were not in the book to try to make Hardin seem like a better boyfriend. In the book, after all, he and Tessa basically just argue and have sex. They sneak into a library after dark, go to an aquarium, bathe in a clawfoot tub and run around campus in a classic romantic movie montage.

1 reply

Back in my freshman year of high school, I was shamefully one of Todd’s

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