Question

Speaker for new Sonos Amp

  • 26 November 2019
  • 7 replies
  • 102 views

  • Contributor I
  • 2 replies

 

I bought a elac's ub5 speaker yesterday.

Picture above is the spec sheet of it.

I'm considering to buy sonos amp but seems like it has too much power for my speaker.

 

This speaker is 4ohm. So the sonos amp's side, It would be 250w. 

But this speaker's peak power is 140w.

Almost twice to peak power.

 

I'm newbie to amp, and passive speaker setup.

So wondering this would be okay…

 

I already own a pair of sonos one, and one symfonisk.

I want to use it all grouped playing.

Ub5 for front L,R, Sonos one for rear. Symfonisk for mono center in a room

 

So the sonos amp is the only option... 

 

Hope not amp burn my speaker's coil...but If it's not fit for sonos amp.. I would return ub5..

 

I'm gonna buy a DAC and turn the DAC's volume knob minimum. Is that gonna make it better or meaning less?

 

 

 


7 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

If you cranked the Amp up with loud music you might be able to damage the speaker but it would likely be sound bad long before that point.

The 85 dB isn’t very efficient so having the extra power available is probably not a bad thing.

Too much power is never a problem, you are in charge of the power via the volume controls, and the music will sound too loud before you burn out the speakers...in a typical domestic environment.

Too little power is the real problem because it can cause speaker damage when the amp is distorting to create adequate sound levels,  and usually doing this unknown to the user.

Not sure how you would use a DAC though, with the amp. Or why you even want it.

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

I missed the DAC question, are you sure the DAC you are getting is better than what Sonos already has? If it is technically better in some respect will you be able to hear the difference? 

If it is better then maybe the Sonos Amp isn’t for you and you should try a Port and external amp that might be made to work with your DAC.

Too much power is never a problem, you are in charge of the power via the volume controls, and the music will sound too loud before you burn out the speakers...in a typical domestic environment.

Too little power is the real problem because it can cause speaker damage when the amp is distorting to create adequate sound levels,  and usually doing this unknown to the user.

Not sure how you would use a DAC though, with the amp. Or why you even want it.

Thanks a lot.

I'm newbie to passive speaker system.

So I didn't know that wattage goes to the speaker can be variable with volume control.

(Still don't know voltage or current which changes with volume.. DAC's spec says 4vrms balanced 2vrms unbalanced..so seems like current changes...)

I live in small room alone.. 20m². 

So I cannot listen in high volume. So seems everythings gonna be okay..I think. 

 

Thanks a lot.

I missed the DAC question, are you sure the DAC you are getting is better than what Sonos already has? If it is technically better in some respect will you be able to hear the difference? 

If it is better then maybe the Sonos Amp isn’t for you and you should try a Port and external amp that might be made to work with your DAC.

I'm gonna rca out from my DAC to SONOS amp's line in.

Does sonos amp do A/D convert and D/A conversion again ? even if I connect line in?

 

I think sonos amp is like sort of integrated amp.

Even if It may also have DAC for airplay, alexa and hdmi's digital signal convert…

I know port+dac+poweramp would be better choice.

But It takes much more money for poweramp.

And recently there's not many PA that only has poweramping.

Also It's all big, power hog if it has nice sound quality and my room is so small..

 

Thank you for kind detailed answer.

 

The Sonos amp will do A to D and D to A for line in.

So the question is, why a DAC to line in at all? Whatever your source that needs line in can be directly wired to the line in on the amp.

And wireless sources on the home WiFi network will play wirelessly with Sonos Amp.

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