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Cellular internet

  • 21 August 2018
  • 4 replies
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I'm about to ditch my awful Orange internet connection in France and replace with a 4G cellular internet connection..... I understand there may be issues with this in terms of my Sonos installation? Can anyone shed any light on this?
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Best answer by jgatie 21 August 2018, 14:09

The only issue is that most 4G hot spots do not have an Ethernet connection, so you will need to change the SSID and password of one Sonos unit before disconnecting your old router. Connect a Sonos unit to the old router via Ethernet, then change the WiFi credentials to the new SSID/password for the hot spot.
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4 replies

The only issue is that most 4G hot spots do not have an Ethernet connection, so you will need to change the SSID and password of one Sonos unit before disconnecting your old router. Connect a Sonos unit to the old router via Ethernet, then change the WiFi credentials to the new SSID/password for the hot spot.
Userlevel 7
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Hi agkd007. jgatie is spot on. These 4G routers can be hit-or-miss. Your greatest chance of success lies in his instructions. Let us know how this goes. Thanks.
That's most helpful, Sonos replied with a blank "we don't support 4G connections" i.e wonderfully unhelpful. I didnt ask them if they supported it or not, i asked if it would work. Your answer much more useful. The problem is that the normal telcom delivered internet is beyond appalling and everyone here in the valley has switched to 4G and have orders of magnitude improvements. Thanks again.
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If you're willing to spend the coin, there are actually a number of 4G routers out there that do provide wired network connections. Of course, these are in the area of a couple to few hundred dollars (US) in price, and may not be available worldwide (the site I've seen them on is primarily aimed at US/North America use). But it does show that such products do exist. They're often aimed at small business use... bus lines (they can also provide GPS tracking), 4G failover (if a wired internet connection fails, switch to using the 4G connection instead), and the like are other features they have.

You can also find 4G modems with Ethernet connections that could be used as the WAN connection on any standard router, instead of a DSL or cable modem. Netgear has one, though at least here in the US they mention its use only on AT&T.