Sonos One Gen 2 Now Available


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The Sonos One is getting an internal component update, which means Sonos One (Gen 2) will begin showing up in stores and websites soon if they aren't already listed. Functionally and aesthetically, you won't notice a difference between the two generations of Sonos One, and both will continue to be supported through regular updates. 

The main changes for Gen 2 are an updated processor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE for setup and troubleshooting), and increased memory.

You can stereo pair a Gen 2 with Gen 1, or use them together with a Sonos home theater setup as surrounds. There aren't any functionality changes between the two, and Google Assistant will be coming to both of them when we're ready to go.

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36 replies

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Something to keep in mind when asking for updates to some of the restrictions Sonos imposes is that they have a huge number of devices out there and in use that don't have the memory to support very much in the way of upgrades and each tweak must be carefully weighed against the remaining free space or the need to drop features (like the CR-100 support) to make room for them.

The number of folks needing more than 65K tracks is probably pretty small particularly in comparison to folks with ZPs and the like that are the most limited devices. The folks facing the 65K limit have other options to work around it, the ZP folks would need new devices or Sonos would have to develop, test and maintain two different sets of software. We see the same issues with asking for an SMB update.
For people curious about the Sonos One Gen 1 and Gen 2 and the PLAY:1, there's an excellent thread started by AjTrek1 with a comparison of the features of each here:

https://en.community.sonos.com/what-to-get-228989/sonos-one-gen2-gen1-and-play-1-product-comparison-chart-6821684
There are those of us who are of the opinion that it would take a radical rewrite of the core of the Sonos system in order to separate out the library update function to work differently on different devices. Not impossible, of course, but a lot of work, that I'm not sure they're anxious to do. Or, it will be in the next update we get, who knows. And at the same time, you might have to effectively write different kernels for different devices, as the base code may no longer fit on the older devices with lesser memory. Which would increase the difficulty of doing updates.

I like the concept a lot, I think Sonos is somewhat hamstrung by decisions that were made long before the current regime, based on data that was valid then, but is no longer valid now.
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Hi Ryan,

Thank you for your reply & I know you can't share news about future features for Gen2, but the new hardware & increased memory is encouraging news for those who were disappointed by the Gen1's limitation in this regard, and if a more generous upper limit was integrated in Gen2 I'd have no issue upgrading all my units to the new version, as shared networked libraries are still popular with music enthusiasts in families, particularly those with flaky internet connections.

As I'm sure you can appreciate, it doesn't take many tracks in a 5-person family with different tastes to reach the "65,000 limit" from a shared NAS drive & whilst users with large stored libraries may be in a minority, it still remains a dealbreaker for many...
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Hi Andyd1302, you're correct in that limit is a result of the maximum amount of memory allocated on Sonos players for the music index. While newer players have more memory than the older ones, we still keep updating all of the older ones too in the software department. Since the music index is stored on all Sonos players in the household, the limit has to be in place based on the lowest memory among players.

We know that a dedicated portion of the community is interested in seeing something worked around to increase this limit, but I don't have any news I can share about future plans. We'll be sure to post on the community if there's any movement around this topic.
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I realise a collective groan will descend across the forum, but I was wondering if a Sonos rep could plesse confirm if the release of the Gen2 model has addressed one of the bugbears of Gen1 devices, namely the "65,000" indexing limit, which made me hold off purchasing more Sonos units and seemed to be a recurring issue for many...

https://en.community.sonos.com/controllers-software-228995/65-000-track-limit-unreasonable-4757599

Whilst the advent of streaming services has somewhat weakened the argument in recent Years, for those purchasers living in a rural area whose internet connection is flaky at best & where streaming services are inappropriate, it would be good to know Sonos has listened to concerns raised and developed a Worldwide model that finally addresses the indexing limit in the hardware of the Gen2 model so at least those users affected can enjoy their own networked music beyond the "65,000 limit".
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Gotcha, thanks.
Will there be any difference in MSRP between Gen 1 and Gen 2 Sonos One devices? When will they hit retailers? If they have, does the packaging look any different?
https://www.sonos.com/en-us/shop/one.html
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Will there be any difference in MSRP between Gen 1 and Gen 2 Sonos One devices? When will they hit retailers? If they have, does the packaging look any different?
I literally bought Sonos One (Gen 1) 2 weeks ago. Should I bother exchanging my devices for Gen 2? I hate to bother but I don't want to be "phased out" while I'm just getting on board with my Sonos setup.
I believe you should, if the free return window is available to you. I see no sense in a gen 2 being announced if it really is functionally identical, so I strongly suspect that this identical stuff is true today, but may probably not be so tomorrow.
In the past Sonos has changed its internal components without changing the model designation, so there has to be reason they are departing from this practice.
I wouldn't. Too much trouble to do so.

And being "phased out" wouldn't be for another 10 or 15 years, based on past performance. So far, the only devices that Sonos has "phased out" are controllers, not audio speakers of any type.
I literally bought Sonos One (Gen 1) 2 weeks ago. Should I bother exchanging my devices for Gen 2? I hate to bother but I don't want to be "phased out" while I'm just getting on board with my Sonos setup.
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Pure speculation, but I would guess this has more to do with production costs than it does with future proofing the product. It's well known that Sonos saw themselves as being late to the voice control game, and wanted to get the Sonos One to the market as quick as possible. It's quite possible that they did not get the best deals in place for parts, favoring getting the product to market over getting the cost as low as possible. It's not too surprising that Sonos could get the same product out a year and half later with better quality, and cheaper parts. (Cheaper in cost, not quality).

I'm not saying the Gen 2 doesn't future proof Sonos One a bit more, but I can't see that as the primary motivator, as they likely wouldn't do this if it didn't increase profitability at the same time.
I wonder if they’ve switched from the Texas Instruments TPA-3118 to the Qualcomm DDFA chipset to improve performance and be more consistent with the Amp’s architecture.

https://www.qualcomm.com/news/onq/2017/10/04/premium-audio-quality-class-d-amplifier-more-about-qualcomm-ddfa

BTW, is there a threaded mounting socket on the back of the new One?
You see me reassured by your optimism. I can only wish the longest possible life for our Sonos systems
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As long as my antique ZP-80s keep plugging along I'll be happy.

If Sonos adds neat stuff to the new hardware they well may do more tricks like offloading the music index to the most capable devices. That is really nice when you have old and slow ZPs and Gen 1 Play 5s.
Yes, but this is not an era of products at the planned obsolescence that has just opened. How long will our old Play1s benefit from new updates?

Considering every Sonos player ever made still receives updates, and the only thing ever to not be updated is the 14 year old CR100 controller, I'd start to wonder about that sometime around 2027.
Yes, but this is not an era of products at the planned obsolescence that has just opened. How long will our old Play1s benefit from new updates?
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If Sonos have recognised a future need for better processing power or increased memory, it's good they are planning ahead. If they don't release the enhanced speaker as "Gen 2" they will sooner or later get floods of "this speaker works but that one doesn't". This way, a future feature can be identified as "not available for Gen 1"

For me: I just bought some Gen 1's a few weeks ago, before Gen 2 was leaked. Am I upset the Gen 2 is now available: yes. Had I known I prob would have held off buying.

But whilst a dumb, wired speaker will last indefinitely, intelligent ones like Sonos will be evolving for a long time. I bought based on current capabilities, as should we all.

If I had dumb, wired speakers the amp/receiver/processor would be the evolving element and sooner or later that component would lack a "must-have" new feature. I wouldn't berate the amp manufacturer for including it in a new version of my amp and not back-engineering it into mine.

Well done Sonos, for planning and manufacturing for future needs.
How would they know any difference if it wasn't called gen 2 in the first place?
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Sonos naming protocol logic remains a puzzle. The 5 gen 2 is a completely different player and will not even pair with the gen 1; it ought to have been called a 6 or more.
This one on the other hand is said to be functionally identical with the same appearance, and will pair with the gen 1. So why the announcement? I am sure that all products go through changes in internal componentry from time to time that is never announced here.


Because people will notice the gen 2 and then go completely insane trying to guess what the differences are and spread false rumors about what impact that has. As usual, it is better for the company to distribute the facts in advance rather than let the rumor mill do its thing.
Sonos naming protocol logic remains a puzzle. The 5 gen 2 is a completely different player and will not even pair with the gen 1; it ought to have been called a 6 or more.
This one on the other hand is said to be functionally identical with the same appearance, and will pair with the gen 1. So why the announcement? I am sure that all products go through changes in internal componentry from time to time that is never announced here.
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mrmagloo, the BT you speak of is the Bluetooth Low Energy system, like exists in the Beam already. It's not designed for streaming music, it's designed for ease of setup only.The point is, what's the sense of going through the trouble of adding any BT, to cut corners and avoid solving an already glaring short coming.
mrmagloo, the BT you speak of is the Bluetooth Low Energy system, like exists in the Beam already. It's not designed for streaming music, it's designed for ease of setup only.
Pirate, there is no point to purchasing/upgrading hardware if you don't need to. Yes, it future proofs your installation, but if you're not using that functionality now, since it doesn't exist, then there's absolutely no point. My suspicion is the extra functionality might be needed in 2 years with some new Sonos system change, but it certainly won't be an immediate issue.

I continue to use PLAY:1s, PLAY:3s, PLAY:5 gen 1, without any need to update them to Sonos Ones, or PLAY:5 gen 2s, and they all continue to perform flawlessly for me. And no, I didn't complain when Sonos added AirPlay 2, since it wasn't a feature that was included or promised when I bought those devices. Sure, I picked up a Sonos One, so I could group it with the rest of my speakers....but the original speakers continue to work in exactly the way they did when I purchased them.

I suspect there are a lot of people out there with the old ZonePlayers, too. I read recently a quote from the CEO (I think) that said that somewhere in the vicinity of 90% of all Sonos speakers sold were still in use.

If you like your install, keep it. Don't purchase anything new until you need to. It might be later this year, it could be 5 years from now, and there will be lots of new options.