Sonos 9.2 - Automatic Updates, Volume Limits, Desktop, Dock and More

  • 9 October 2018
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75 replies

@Master T, since it occurs on android, I'd doubt it's an issue with the recent upgrade. It could be an issue on the Google side of the interface with Sonos, or on Sonos side. I wouldn't be surprised if there is a 32 track limit for albums set somewhere, instead of it be an identical name issue.

That particular album is also available on Amazon music, all 34 tracks. If I remember, I'll have a look when I get home and am connected to my Sonos to see if the issue is repeat isn't just Google related.
Possibly the metadata fields actually used are identical for the two files, so they are seen as duplicates.
There is mention of disabling WiFi and disabling wireless - which is it? If it is any wireless, would it not potentially interfere with the operation of SonosNet?
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That particular album is also available on Amazon music, all 34 tracks. If I remember, I'll have a look when I get home and am connected to my Sonos to see if the issue is repeat isn't just Google related.

The issue is just Google related and doesn't appear when I explore "My Music" in Amazon.

Possibly the metadata fields actually used are identical for the two files, so they are seen as duplicates.

I actually tried changing the names and metadata to see if that would affect how they were listed. It didn't. But Google of course scans the mp3 and inserts its own data. As I recall, they don't really use the file you upload, but just create a link to the song as it exists in their own library. No sense storing a single song two million times, I suppose.
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There is mention of disabling WiFi and disabling wireless - which is it? If it is any wireless, would it not potentially interfere with the operation of SonosNet?
In this case, they're being used interchangeably, for better or worse. If you go into the settings and disable it for a player, all wireless functions of that player's wireless card are disabled: SonosNet, connecting to the home WiFi network, connecting to Sonos players using the 5GHz for surround sound.

We generally don't recommend using this feature unless it's necessary for your setup, but it's there for the times when it's needed.
Thanks for clarifying, Ryan.

BTW, I think that the volume limit, with associated beneficial effect on low volume control, will be well received by many users. It's not something I shall use, but I'm sure some others will. It also shows that the occasional claims on here that 'Sonos doesn't listen to its users' are unfounded. Sonos cannot, and should not, do everything that's requested, but does respond when the gain justifies the effort.
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BTW, I think that the volume limit, with associated beneficial effect on low volume control, will be well received by many users. It's not something I shall use, but I'm sure some others will. It also shows that the occasional claims on here that 'Sonos doesn't listen to its users' are unfounded. Sonos cannot, and should not, do everything that's requested, but does respond when the gain justifies the effort.
Yes, this is definitely a plus! To improve the low-range volume control, you can set a lower limit. For example, make the limit be 50 (which is still plenty loud), and you double the resolution of the volume control (50% on the slider is now what used to be 25% when the limit was 100). And the limit applies to everything, including alarms, so make sure to adjust those if you set a limit, otherwise the volume may be too low now!
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In this case, they're being used interchangeably, for better or worse. If you go into the settings and disable it for a player, all wireless functions of that player's wireless card are disabled: SonosNet, connecting to the home WiFi network, connecting to Sonos players using the 5GHz for surround sound. We generally don't recommend using this feature unless it's necessary for your setup, but it's there for the times when it's needed.

So Ryan..I run in Boost mode using a dedicated Boost. So if I understand your statement...If I turn-off the wireless unless every speaker I own is wired via Ethernet I'd loose all Sonos? That being the case...when and why would one turn off wireless... It seems like a Catch22 :?

Cheer!
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Eu escrevo do Brasil. A atualização 9.2 liberou a possibilidade de desativar a rede WI-FI dos dispositivos Sonos. Ótimo! Como eu já utilizava parte dos players em protocolo STP, conectados via cabo de rede, estou experimentando um bug um tanto quanto chato ao desativar o WI-FI do meu PLAYBAR. No caso, o PLAYBAR linkado com o Sonos SUB. O problema é que se eu desativo o WI-FI da PLAYBAR (que está conectado via cabo) automaticamente o Sonos SUB pára de reponder na rede, ou seja, ele perde a função de subwoofer da PLAYBAR. Já reiniciei todos os dispositivos, e, enquanto não reativo o WI-FI do PLAYBAR, o Sonos Sub não responde na rede. No mais, muito satisfeito com a magia de software que a Sonos revela. Parabéns por sempre se reinventarem.
AjTrek,

Yes, you would lose all Sonos. Effectively, that function is for experts who have all their speakers wired. Think of it as an option created for installers, and not for the rest of us. But they couldn't very well add it, and not explain it in the release notes. 🙂
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So Ryan..I run in Boost mode using a dedicated Boost. So if I understand your statement...If I turn-off the wireless unless every speaker I own is wired via Ethernet I'd loose all Sonos? That being the case...when and why would one turn off wireless... It seems like a Catch22 :?
Mostly this is a feature for those who have all of their Sonos devices wired into the network, like for home run installations with a bunch of Sonos Amps in a cabinet, all hardwired to a switch. Turning off the wireless on wired players will disconnect every wireless one that isn't able to get back to the router another way. Just like @Icardex talks about in the post just after yours. If you have the wireless disabled, all of the wireless is disabled, which means wireless Sonos devices can't connect. That includes Subs connecting to a Playbar, which is done wirelessly.
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Liguei o PLAYBAR e as 2 PLAY:5 (gen1) via cabo. O restante está conectado via rede WIFI. Não sabia que o SUB dependia da placa de rede WI-FI da PLAYBAR. Não consegui fazer o SUB funcionar enquanto a PLAYBAR está com o WI-FI desativado.

Ryan,

Having read icardex first post above, re his bonded wireless sub issue. If his sub had been wired too, I assume it would have worked, but i have another quick (but different) question here, that also suddenly springs to mind.

If icardex had gone onto later unbond his (wired) sub from the PlayBar and perhaps moved it’s 'Room' in the Sonos App, would that moving of Room, reinstate the subs radio signal.

I don’t have a 'sub' myself to test this, but I know of occasions, here in the community, where people suddenly decide to move their sub between 'Sonos Rooms' and I’m thinking about the occasion perhaps where a few people, over the passage of time, may have forgotten they disabled their radio and move the sub to another room and then forget, or are unable, to cable it and then start wondering why it won’t connect back to their system.

So if a product is moved from one Sonos Room to another... will, (or should), it’s radio then re-enable itself perhaps in the process of 'moving'??

I’m just being 'devils advocate' here and trying to think of every possibility, but I also appreciate that a user could quite easily re-enable the radio on the sub before performing the move.
Icardex,

A 'bonded' PlayBar setup, with the two Play 5’s and a Sub, uses the 5ghz radio in all the bonded devices ... you have switched off both the 5ghz and 2.4ghz radio on the PlayBar, so the sub cannot connect to it over the SonosNet wireless signal, which only runs over the 2.4ghz band ... that band is not quick (timely) enough for a bonded 5.1 signal ... the sub is 'bonded' and is therefore looking for that type of 5ghz radio connection. I’m not sure though if it will work when it is perhaps cabled to the LAN ??
So Ryan..I run in Boost mode using a dedicated Boost. So if I understand your statement...If I turn-off the wireless unless every speaker I own is wired via Ethernet I'd loose all Sonos? That being the case...when and why would one turn off wireless... It seems like a Catch22 :?
Mostly this is a feature for those who have all of their Sonos devices wired into the network, like for home run installations with a bunch of Sonos Amps in a cabinet, all hardwired to a switch. Turning off the wireless on wired players will disconnect every wireless one that isn't able to get back to the router another way. Just like @Icardex talks about in the post just after yours. If you have the wireless disabled, all of the wireless is disabled, which means wireless Sonos devices can't connect. That includes Subs connecting to a Playbar, which is done wirelessly.

AjTrek1,

As you can see perhaps, icardex has already encountered some issues here, by turning off the radio on his wired PlayBar and he’s missed the fact that the 5ghz radio in the PlayBar was the main communication link to his bonded Sub. Obviously the Sub won’t connect over 2.4ghz SonosNet signal, because it is expecting the 5ghz connection via the PlayBar and thus communication has been lost to the Sub and the same thing would have happened to his surrounds too, if they had not been wired.

I assume wiring the sub might be one course of action, but best really to re-enable the radio again on the PlayBar, me thinks.

It’s sometimes best to leave these Advanced WiFi Settings to the professionals, perhaps?
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Why don't you focus on adding DTS support to the playbar instead of this other BS.

Get with it SONOS!
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It’s sometimes best to leave these Advanced WiFi Settings to the professionals, perhaps?

If there is a button or setting, it is our duty to push it or change it. 😃
Why don't you focus on adding DTS support to the playbar instead of this other BS.

Get with it SONOS!


The Playbar will never support DTS. So how about you suggest something that has a chance of being implemented instead of useless complaining?
It’s sometimes best to leave these Advanced WiFi Settings to the professionals, perhaps?

If there is a button or setting, it is our duty to push it or change it. :D

ha ha ...that just reminded me of this...


My brand new sonos connects for my three showrooms are now useless to me with the loss of desktop controller functionality to manage devices (add, remove, group, etc)... It's just a jukebox now.

The lack of a full TCP/IP stack is also frustrating but not the end of the world.

This is really isn't a commercial product, good for home and maybe small businesses.
I have 9 stores I was going to run sonos in and all controlled from one central location, it can still be done but it's not friendly to manage on an IT Admin side of things.
bfabbag,

I assume you propose to manage the audio sites remotely over RDP/VPN, or similar protocol... I understand these are the 10 key features Ryan announced today that are now excluded from the desktop controller in the 9.2 update .. everything else is still available.

Excluded are...
1. Setup, or transfer of a Sonos system
2. Add a player
3. Create, or separate, stereo pairs
4. Registering players at setup
5. Setup a TV
6. Enable parental controls
7. Manage network settings
8. Adjust line-in settings,
9. Opt in, or out, of beta programs
10. Change Sonos account passwords

I'm just wondering how many of the listed 10 items above, a person would actually need to manage a Sonos System from a remote location on a day to day basis?

Most settings mentioned above are usually quite static, once a systems is actually setup and in place and to do that initial-setup, a user needs to be on site anyway.

Everything else, like playing music, grouping/ungrouping speakers, adjusting volume etc. are still available. So I don’t presently see this update as a potential 'show stopper' in your case.
Nothing compelling enough to kill off my Dock just yet. Have removed Sonos app from everything except my primary Android tablet, which doesn't auto update. Will probably give up the Dock once Google Home is finally integrated.
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Thank you Sonos for finally updating the look of the desktop controller - I have been waiting for this for many updates.
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I have disabled the radios on four Sonos devices that are wired to my Ethernet but left my Boost wired. There are 5 other devices running on the Boost's WiFi link with no apparent issues. Aside from the changes in the network matrix and other internal status pages there has been no other impact that I have noticed so far.

I may now move the WiFi disabled devices back to my preferred locations, not where I have them placed now to reduce WiFi interference issues. I'll give it a couple weeks to see if there are any issues I haven't noticed yet though.

Looking at this it appears to me that you can disable WiFi on any wired device or combination of wired devices as long as you leave one device wired to have Boost Mode active.

I have not experimented with what happens if you revert your wireless units to Standard Mode by disabling the radios in all wired devices.
I intend to leave Sonos all the path options it wants. Partially disabling wireless is not for me. Each to their own.