Sonos 10.0 is Now Available

  • 29 January 2019
  • 156 replies
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156 replies

Userlevel 7
Badge +22
Do you have a way of knowing if it is just a 10 second update (app only) or it's then going to want to update all of your devices - with the trouble and/or inconvenience that appears to cause for some?

You don't know until you accept the update. Ask yourself is 10 seconds or 10 minutes (which that is an extreme case) going to ruin your day? I have 5 computers and 4 handheld devices with the Sonos app. Now...do I run to all 9 devices and start the update at the same time...of course not. I'll run the update on my iOS and Android device which are the mains. The others I'll do when I get around to them.

Unlike the updates for my iOS and Android software, Mac and Windows OS's the Sonos updates typically do not require me to babysit them in order to do a restart. They (Sonos updates) run, install and done all without any additional interaction on my part.

Bottom-line I can't convince you one way or the other...you'll have to make the decision for yourself as to when to take a Sonos update. However, the reality is that complaining about them isn't going to change anything. They'll continue to be pushed out and your device (or devices) will continue to install them automatically or manually if you have disabled auto install. The choice is yours.

Cheers!
sjw,

The update time can depend on a good many factors, not least if the user has automatic updates switched on within the Sonos App. That will update the firmware automatically on all Sonos devices at the chosen scheduled times, which are approx...

* Morning: 5 am (5:00)
* Afternoon: 12 pm (12:00)
* Evening: 5 pm (17:00)
* Overnight: 1 am (1:00)

The speakers will normally update within two hours of the selected period.

After that update, it is just a case of updating the software on the controller device itself, which is usually available from the local App Store, or via a link appearing in the App. The software update of the controller is often far quicker than the firmware update of the hardware.

Those who have disabled the automatic firmware update will need to go though both types of update and that takes much longer to do.

Other factors like amount of devices to update and speed of connection will also have a role to play in the time that these things take.

I personally use the automatic update 'morning' schedule and find it works well for my 15 speaker setup, particularly whilst having all my Sonos IP addresses reserved in my routers DHCP Reservation table. That ensures there won’t be a matter of duplicate IP addresses being issued, causing the devices to drop their connection, with some routers.

I then just spend a few moments updating my controller software (iPhone/iPad/PC and Android Tablet). My Wife usually updates her own controller devices through normal App Store updates and downloads.
Userlevel 6
Badge +14
Do you have a way of knowing if it is just a 10 second update (app only) or it's then going to want to update all of your devices - with the trouble and/or inconvenience that appears to cause for some?
...
Bottom-line I can't convince you one way or the other...you'll have to make the decision for yourself as to when to take a Sonos update. However, the reality is that complaining about them isn't going to change anything. They'll continue to be pushed out and your device (or devices) will continue to install them automatically or manually if you have disabled auto install. The choice is yours.

Cheers!
You don't need to convince me of anything. I was merely asking the question, in response to the 'it only takes 10 seconds' comment and the previous point about more information on the update notes. I only update each App as I use it too. The question was that many people do seem to suffer, for one reason or another, whenever there is an update that involves a reboot of all of their devices (usually due to 'poor' IP allocation). If the notes mentioned maybe that a restart of the devices will occur it may allow them to plan more effectively of when to do the update. I don't have the knowledge, for example, if a 'point - point' release is only ever an App update and no restart is required - or even if the release version is even noted in the Store.
Userlevel 7
Badge +26
We don't use a software indication in the version number to identify if it's app only or if there's a player firmware update involved too. 10.0.3 was app only, and only includes a few specific bug fixes that needed to get pushed out there. When it's a few bugs that aren't applicable to everyone, we don't usually list each one of them. Though if someone has contacted us with one of those bugs, we will let them know it's resolved.
Userlevel 7
Badge +21
Since Sonos changed the update process to update all players at once my updates are usually a minute or two. After I reserved IP addresses for all my Sonos gear I haven't had an update problem or needed to do any recovery after a power loss. Since things are going so well I enabled the auto-update and pretty much just ignore fooling with my Sonos setup unless I get a notice I need to do something.
Badge
10.0.3 was app only, and only includes a few specific bug fixes that needed to get pushed out there. When it's a few bugs that aren't applicable to everyone, we don't usually list each one of them. Though if someone has contacted us with one of those bugs, we will let them know it's resolved.

I guess that's as close to an answer as I'll see. I suppose I'll rely on looking through the forum for "...but..." posts before applying updates, especially first-digit updates (9.x.x --> 10.x.x type of thing). Such as "This update provided the fix to my Playbar problem that I asked you for months ago, but made Sirius XM channels stop working." I still say good release notes would be an effective way to know whether I can skip an update that is definitionally useless to me (upgrades hardware like Playbar or features like Alexa that I don't have). Then I don't have to take the risk that it breaks something I do use heavily, like Sirius.