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Meet Sonos Five, studio-quality sound

Meet Sonos Five, studio-quality sound
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Available on June 10th, Sonos Five is our most powerful speaker for music and more in high-fidelity sound. Enjoy seamless control with the all-new Sonos app, Apple AirPlay 2, music service apps, and more.

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Studio quality sound

Sonos Five delivers the same great sound as the Play:5, with updated internals including increased memory, processing power, and a new wireless radio. Six Class-D digital amplifiers are perfectly tuned for Five’s acoustic architecture to power the three tweeters and three mid-woofers. 

 

The custom-designed woofers deliver rich bass while the sealed architecture eliminates reverb and echo. This ensures faithful playback of vocal frequencies in addition to rich bass without distortion, even at high volumes.

 

One center tweeter and two precisely-angled side tweeters create a crisp high-frequency response.

 

This all creates a wide stereo soundstage that directs sound to the left, right, and center from one compact speaker. You can amplify the experience by adding another Sonos Five as a stereo pair in either vertical or horizontal orientations, or bring it to the next level with a Sonos Sub. 

 

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Some more details on Sonos Five:

  • Simple to set-up. Plug Five into power and bring your phone up to Five to automatically pair and securely transfer WiFi credentials using near-field communication (NFC).

  • Analogue line-in. With 3.5 mm jack for connecting another device, bring sound to Sonos from anything with a standard audio connection. 

  • Flexible Orientation. Enjoy great sound with a standalone Sonos Five horizontally, or pair two Fives in the upright position for incredibly detailed stereo separation. A pair of Fives can also be used as surrounds for a Sonos home theater speaker.

  • Control your way. Control Sonos Five with your voice when paired with a voice enabled device, the Sonos app, your favorite music service’s app, or AirPlay 2. Capacitive touch controls for play, pause, skip tracks, adjust the volume, and group rooms just by tapping or swiping the top of the speaker. LED indicates status, and mute status.

  • Tune with Trueplay. Trueplay puts the speaker-tuning capability of the pros in the palm of your hands, adapting and optimizing the sound of the speaker to the unique acoustics of the room. iOS device required. 

  • Dimensions. The dimensions are (H x W x D) 8.03 x 14.33 x 6.06 inches (203 x 364 x 154 mm) and Five weighs 14 lbs (6.36 kg).

Pre-order today on Sonos.com in black with a black grille and, for the first time, white with a white grille for $499 US (€579 EUR).

We’ve announced details for the Sonos Arc and new Sonos Sub. You can also check out our blog for some great stories. 


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158 replies

My apologies. You asked about pairing with the SUB, not the PLAY:5. 

I would assume it does, it would be unusual for any single speaker, that isn’t a Bluetooth speaker,  released by Sonos not to allow bonding to a SUB.

And the Bluetooth speaker is only because it doesn’t connect to a SonosNet signal, which is what Sonos uses for bonding devices. 

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@UseroftheSonos

Regarding stereo pairing, the answer is that the computing components are too different for us to support stereo pairing between the old Play:5 gen2 and the new Sonos Five. 

Yet the Five can still be paired with the Sub gen 1 or 2 which presumably has a greater gap in computing components than it would with the Play 5 gen 2?  

A SUB is not stereo paired, it is bonded where it plays different frequencies than the Five or PLAY:5. Rather a different sort of thing. 

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@Ryan S

Hi, I have some questions I hope you can answer:

Is the dimensions exactly the same on the 5 gen2 and Five?

 

 

Yes.  You can verify that by viewing the dimensions of the Play:5 gen 2 refurbished page.

I have an additional dimension question, what are the height and width pf the Five at the rear of the speaker?  Can someone with the a Play:5 gen 2 do a quick measurement and let me know.   Considering getting a 5 to place in a somewhat tight space.

 

Will the Flexson gen2 stands fit the Fives?

 

 

According the product page, yes.

Will a sub gen2 pair with the Fives in a stereo config?

99% sure the answer is yes to this.  I believe it was said earlier

 

Hello,

The 5gen2 is approx 340mm x 180mm on the back.

 

I guess we have to take your word for it Ryan but that seems a strange reason to be honest.

The oldest Play 5 Gen 1 speakers are more than capable of Stereo pairing, as are the Gen 2's. Struggling to see how the S2 capable Play 5 Gen 2 will struggle with this “complicated computing work” to maintain a stereo connection with a higher powered ‘partner'.

In the past the reason was always different sound signatures. Now these appear to be identical that excuse can't be used and we're told the device that is still on sale can't do this complicated work - but older devices can and that even the Gen 2 can with another Gen 2 in am S2 scenario.

 

People are stating as fact that they can be paired when you really have no idea if they can or not for what the issue is.

I’m surprised like every one else that the 5 doesn’t have voice control.  Although I gave up on voice control with ones awhile ago and have been using a Dot anyway.

My issue with the 5 is the price.  it might have made sense when it was introduced but $499 doesn’t make sense anymore.  There is too much competition out there.

The HomePod sounds better, has 360 sound, Siri works fine for anything I use it for and the HomePod mics are amazing and it’s $299 often on sale for less.  Airplay 2 means I can mix and match and I pretty much never use the Sonos app except for home theater with my Amp.

It’s puzzling how little the 5 changed, perhaps they ran out of R&D  $$ on the ARC or the Move which only  small niche will buy.

Hmmm, a $500 smart speaker with no voice control...that’s just weird.

A quick search would reveal the following:

https://en.community.sonos.com/wireless-speakers-228992/when-will-the-play-5-gen-2-be-replaced-updated-6835892

https://en.community.sonos.com/what-to-get-228989/play-5-updates-6822240

However, maybe what we need is a buyer’s guide like they have over at MacRumours:

https://buyersguide.macrumors.com

Yeah, a legitimate question, that was never answered by sonos, deflected by fanboys and then the subject was closed.

That does not at all look like they were trying to hide the 3.gen for as long as possible to try and empty the current stock of 2.gen.

 

I only saw discounts on the sub, Playbase and Playbar.  Not on the 2nd Gen Play 5.

The HomePod sounds better, has 360 sound, Siri works fine for anything I use it for and the HomePod mics are amazing and it’s $299 often on sale for less.  Airplay 2 means I can mix and match and I pretty much never use the Sonos app except for home theater with my Amp.

 

 

I haven’t seen many reviews stating the HomePod sounds better, and the HomePod isn’t thought of as a very successful product.  

It’s puzzling how little the 5 changed, perhaps they ran out of R&D  $$ on the ARC or the Move which only  small niche will buy.

 

I’m not sure how you’re able to classify the Arc and Move as small niche markets.  I haven’t really seen anything to suggest that.  I think you could make an argument that they are gateway products.  New customers looking for a bluetooth speaker, or Dolby Atmos support, could get these as their first products, but end up buying more as they see the value in whole home audio.

 

Hmmm, a $500 smart speaker with no voice control...that’s just weird.

 Although I am surprised by the lack of voice control,  I don’t think Sonos would have done it if marketing numbers said that it was needed in order to sell the speaker.   I can’t imagine sales will be worse than they were for the play:5 gen 2.

I’m not going to debate HomePod vs 5 here since this isn’t the place for it especially for people who haven’t had both and your characterization of what reviews say isn’t accurate.

I was referring to the Move as a niche product not the ARC.  I expect the ARC will be very successful whether used for Atmos or not.  I actually think $799 isn’t a bad price for what you get even if you don’t use it for Atmos.  Personally I use an Amp with Revel Concerta 2 speakers, Sonos sub, and One SL rears.  I have Sonos One’s and HomePods in stereo pairs in 5 rooms around the house.

New customers looking for a bluetooth speaker aren’t going to spend $399 when there are so many other options.  

I think $500 for a “smart” speaker with no voice control in 2020 is really surprising and puzzling.  

I’m not going to debate HomePod vs 5 here since this isn’t the place for it especially for people who haven’t had both and your characterization of what reviews say isn’t accurate.

 

 

Well, you’re the one who made the claim...

New customers looking for a bluetooth speaker aren’t going to spend $399 when there are so many other options.  

 

 

No, they are not, but the Move isn’t just a bluetooth speaker.    I think it will appeal to those looking at higher end BT speakers, and get further drawn in by it’s WiFi side.   And yes, a lot of buyers are going to be Sonos customers who are drawn to the multiple uses of it.

 

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To me the comparison with the HomePod doesn’t make sense.

Sonos, especially the Five / Play:5 is targeted at the classic Hi-fi music listeners, who want to listen to their music with ease and be able to wirelessly have whole house audio.

The HomePod is more like a background or blast loud speaker for the younger crowd, not for the music listener.

I think most music enthusiasts do not accept the “bounced off the wall” music effect HomePod generates - hence they would much prefer a Five.

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To me the comparison with the HomePod doesn’t make sense.

Sonos, especially the Five / Play:5 is targeted at the classic Hi-fi music listeners, who want to listen to their music with ease and be able to wirelessly have whole house audio.

The HomePod is more like a background or blast loud speaker for the younger crowd, not for the music listener.

I think most music enthusiasts do not accept the “bounced off the wall” music effect HomePod generates - hence they would much prefer a Five.

The comparison makes sense, that is what gave you the information to reach your conclusion.  For you and your needs.

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sonosg Of course you are spot on! 
I guess what I was trying to say is that the two products are intended for two different audiences / use cases.

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I don’t think I’ve ever seen a review that picked a HomePod over a Five.  There were several that placed it above a One, but that was when it first came out, and before Apple neutered it with a midrange focused EQ update.  I’ve owned both (HomePod and several Ones) and IMO, the new EQ changed the HomePod from being slightly better than the One to being slightly worse.  And given its other deficiencies (no ethernet, no individual tone control, worse networking, no good way to integrate it with TVs for surround sound, higher price, etc.) I just don’t see how it competes well at all with Sonos in its current state, at least for most people’s needs.  Anyway, long winded way to say that if it doesn’t compare well with the Sonos One, why should compare well to a Five?  

Besides, as others have said, the Five isn’t really meant to compete with smart speakers.  They’re designed for people who would otherwise be looking at something like KEFs, for dedicated listening.  

The HomePod has its place for some buyers and I appreciate that.  If you have Apple Music and are otherwise already committed to apple’s ecosystem, are ok with Siri, and can get it on one of the $199 sales, then it’s a good buy for a go anywhere speaker for general ambient listening.  I personally prefer the One even in that scenario, but I wouldn’t fault someone who preferred the HomePod for whatever reason.  

By the way, I also own a Move and can say with zero hesitation that it outperforms a HomePod, and by a good bit.  I’d say that if someone wants a higher end single speaker, smart or not, and doesn’t mind spending a bit more, then the Move is a great choice, even at its premium price.  

 

@pup,

Thanks for that honest review.  Check the posting history of the person who stated Homepod was better than a Five.  They have never once, in five years, said one thing positive about Sonos.  Not once.  So you can take their opinion with a grain of salt the size of Wyoming.

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Hi, I don’t know if this is the right thread for this but you can move it somewhere else suitable if you like. (Perhaps someone has already asked this somewhere.)

I have some thoughts regarding the new Five.

As read in an article online somewhere-

Why now- why so little?

Talking to people here in Sweden many seems a bit confused why there were so little upgrades on the new Sonos flagship speaker. Yes more memory better processor and WiFi radio, but many people I know including myself really thought that Sonos would release a new Bluesound Pulse2i killer, something that would outperform their flagship and other competitors.(and outperform the play5gen2)

I have not heard the Pulse2i myself but according to my brother it has more of everything compared to the Gen2?

(e.g 24 bit/192 kHz and more power and quality psb drivers)

What’s your opinion of the Five versus the Pulse2i? (In let’s say a stereo pair.)

What would you prefer and why?

 

*This leaves me with the question, will Sonos soon release another speaker that might take over the throne from the Five as the flagship Sonos audiophile speaker? Perhaps the New “Sonos Six” :wink::thinking: (they have also removed the phrase “Our most powerful speaker available” on the web site :thinking: )

 

Have a good day! Or evening as here in Sweden!

 

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Hi, Five are future proof?

WiFi 6 is present and seams Five will not supported. What Sonos means by HD sound?

This codecs will play natively: 24 bit/44.1 kHz - 24 bit/96 kHz or 24 bit/192 kHz?

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I’m wondering if they have plans to use these as rear Atmos speakers.

 

The side firing tweeters look like they could double as upward firing Atmos tweeters when the speakers are placed vertically as surrounds.

 

That would be a crazy coincidence, since the Play:5 Gen 2 was released back in 2015 (and has the same design).  I assume that Atmos wasn’t even on their radar back then..

I’m wondering if they have plans to use these as rear Atmos speakers.

 

The side firing tweeters look like they could double as upward firing Atmos tweeters when the speakers are placed vertically as surrounds.

 

 

I can’t imagine they would ever do such a thing.

 

That would be a crazy coincidence, since the Play:5 Gen 2 was released back in 2015 (and has the same design).  I assume that Atmos wasn’t even on their radar back then..

 

Not really.  Side firing speakers help to provide an illusion of a bigger soundstage.  They did the same thing on the Beam as well.  As I understand it the Arc has side firing speakers partially for Atmos content and partially for the soundstage.

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Hi, I don’t know if this is the right thread for this but you can move it somewhere else suitable if you like. (Perhaps someone has already asked this somewhere.)

I have some thoughts regarding the new Five.

As read in an article online somewhere-

Why now- why so little?

Talking to people here in Sweden many seems a bit confused why there were so little upgrades on the new Sonos flagship speaker. Yes more memory better processor and WiFi radio, but many people I know including myself really thought that Sonos would release a new Bluesound Pulse2i killer, something that would outperform their flagship and other competitors.(and outperform the play5gen2)

I have not heard the Pulse2i myself but according to my brother it has more of everything compared to the Gen2?

(e.g 24 bit/192 kHz and more power and quality psb drivers)

What’s your opinion of the Five versus the Pulse2i? (In let’s say a stereo pair.)

What would you prefer and why?

 

*This leaves me with the question, will Sonos soon release another speaker that might take over the throne from the Five as the flagship Sonos audiophile speaker? Perhaps the New “Sonos Six” :wink::thinking: (they have also removed the phrase “Our most powerful speaker available” on the web site :thinking: )

 

Have a good day! Or evening as here in Sweden!

 


They are different speakers - 2 woofers 2 tweeters in the Blusound vs. 3 woofers and 3 tweeters in the Sonos.   But Sonos woofers are only 4” vs. 5.25” in the Bluesound.   Person to person they are going to have a preference for one or other - one review or person does not make for one better than other.   Sonos Trueplay tune really helps Sonos shine though.

We won’t know how the sound is tweaked with the new version but I’m sure there are some subtle changes.   Also getting higher bit rate on Sonos will help the audiophile crowd.

Overall - good healthy competition.

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Currently on the Sonos Five page on Sonos website it says that the Memory is 512 MB SDRAM & 512 MB NAND Flash. Why did Sonos change it from the specs posted originally i.e. 1 GB SDRAM and 4 GB NV?

 

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Will the Sonos Play 5 Gen 2 stand also work for Sonos Five?

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Currently on the Sonos Five page on Sonos website it says that the Memory is 512 MB SDRAM & 512 MB NAND Flash. Why did Sonos change it from the specs posted originally i.e. 1 GB SDRAM and 4 GB NV?

 

It looks like initially a mistake was made and wrong specs posted. The first few days they posted for the Sub wrong information too (I believe they posted 2GB SDRAM and 4GB NV). Later they corrected it to 256MB SDRAM / 256MB NV and added the spec for the CPU. To me, the new specs look more plausible and in line with the capabilities of each component.

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Will the Sonos Play 5 Gen 2 stand also work for Sonos Five?

Yes. The Sonos Five has the same footprint as the Play:5 gen 2 and the same accessories will work with it.

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Does anyone know what are the processor and memory specs of Play 5 (Gen 2) ?

It is on the product page.

 

https://www.sonos.com/en-us/shop/five.html

 

CPU
Quad Core
1.3 GHz

 

Memory
512 MB SDRAM
512 MB NAND Flash