Meet Sonos Beam



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I'm surprised no-one seems to have mentioned the extremely disappointing fact that this soundbar only has one HDMI Port?

Essentially if you want to use HDMI ARC you are going to lose a HDMI port on your TV for nothing but audio. It would surely have made sense to have 2 HDMI Ports so at least video could have been passed from one connected device to the TV and therefore not wasting a HDMI port on the TV.

The lack of any additional codec support from HDMI ARC vs Optical on this soundbar means the only advantage to using HDMI is CEC control, which if you have a harmony remote is useless anyway.

I love Sonos, but this product is extremely disappointing.
Userlevel 2
[quote=ryan_29]I find it quite telling that there aren’t many “take my money now” or “pre-ordered” replies on the companies own Grand Release thread.

It's fairly clear you've not been around here that much.

Pretty much every product that Sonos has launched in the last 5 years or so has been met with a certain amount of disdain on these forums. And that's largely because Sonos tend to launch products that aren't particularly exciting or revolutionary. They are not "shiny".

But, over time, the shallow give-me-all-the-latest-trendy-technology-just-for-the-sake-of-it types (you know, the sort who think that Dolby Atmos in a one-piece soundbar is a good thing) drift away, and it turns out that Sonos have been selling bucket loads to normal people who find that the Sonos products fit their needs very well.

Because Sonos are, and always have been, in for the long-haul. More specifically, I mean they have always aimed to release products that have aren't inherently disposable, like so much of today's technology is. They aim to release products that will not only be usable, but, supported, "current" and active use in a decade's time. That's pretty much unheard of in today's market.

I put the word "current" because a small fringe of society will interpret that as having the latest trendy, news-making technical whizz-bangs. That's not what I mean. By "current" I mean stuff that's actually useful and applicable to a significant proportion of consumers (for argument's sake, let's put that at 30% of users or more). Stuff that's actually survived the early adoption curves and has become mainstream. Dolby Atmos, as an example, has not been implemented in 30% or more of homes. I would be surprised if it's in more than 1%.

Some consumer tech companies like to chase the latest and greatest partly because their company strategy is based on backing multiple horses, and partly because it's based on rapidly obsoleting products and replacing them with new ones. Shiny new technology is fun, makes news headlines, and gets geeks excited, but it rarely makes for great products that are supported (e.g. with upgrades) for more than a few years. It's not particularly good for consumers.

So Sonos's latest product doesn't deliver what you wanted. Well, that's a shame but, frankly, noone cares including, I suspect, Sonos. If you don't want what the BEAM has to offer then it's simply that you aren't in their target market. Tweakers and trend-followers have been asking for specific high-end capabilities from Sonos for years. Sonos has gone from strength to strength specifically by not being distracted by these niches and short-term trends, and by waiting to see what actually works.

It's not particularly sexy, but it does result in great products which fulfil what the vast majority of people want and need, and which continue being supported, upgraded and useful many years after you purchased them. That's something you can't say about pretty much any other digital audio vendor around.

Most of the other vendors have a track record of abandoning major product lines after a few years, leaving their customers stranded. Comparably, many of us are actively and seamlessly using Sonos equipment we purchased more than 13 years ago and which is still supported (e.g. with upgrades) today.

Cheers,

Keith


I appreciate the thoughtful response ... even if I don't particularly agree with every point.

It's true that many people here complaining (myself included) are not the target market for the Beam. However, all the 'geeks' and 'trend followers' you are referring to (the 1%), are the folks who are typically at the forefront of what will become mainstream technology (I was one of those idiots with a brand new DVD player and you couldn't even rent a DVD!). Haha! So, that being said, I don't think it's too crazy for Sonos to listen to these boards and maybe adopt some of their requests. How could it possibly hurt? Where is the downside?

As for their company strategy, I'm sorry, if it was working so fantastically giving the mass consumers what they wanted, the company wouldn't be laying off folks and they wouldn't be struggling to stay relevant when the competition is starting to seriously heat up. Google, Apple, and Amazon are literally in their 'audio' infancy. When they start 'growing up,' it's going to get even uglier for Sonos (unless, of course, their strategy is to get bought out after IPO). Which leads me back to my point, why alienate (current and future) customers by not incorporating current codecs or allow for a traditional 5.1 (or 7.1) setups? Now THAT would be a differentiator from their competitors! I like Sonos - I want to see them survive, grow, and be successful. However, I don't think they have been nearly aggressive enough in R&D and product development. IF providing HDMI in a mini-playbar that can talk to 3 digital assistants in 2018 is their ground-breaking disruptor that's going to propel their revenue model - well FWIW, I think they are in big trouble.
IF providing HDMI in a mini-playbar that can talk to 3 digital assistants in 2018 is their ground-breaking disruptor that's going to propel their revenue model - well FWIW, I think they are in big trouble.

Amen. Sonos was so promising just 2 years ago. I still think they can survive because no competitor's portfolio is sufficiently developed _yet_. But it looks like the lead is being squandered going by the recent announcements.
Badge +12
I'm surprised no-one seems to have mentioned the extremely disappointing fact that this soundbar only has one HDMI Port?

Essentially if you want to use HDMI ARC you are going to lose a HDMI port on your TV for nothing but audio. It would surely have made sense to have 2 HDMI Ports so at least video could have been passed from one connected device to the TV and therefore not wasting a HDMI port on the TV.

The lack of any additional codec support from HDMI ARC vs Optical on this soundbar means the only advantage to using HDMI is CEC control, which if you have a harmony remote is useless anyway.

I love Sonos, but this product is extremely disappointing.


Well that would be expecting too much 😉 But it would have been nice to have 2 ports like some of the higher end sound bars that support atmos.

Too many points to go over here although I do get your overall point. DTS implementation is neither new or shiney, short term, trendy or sexy. It’s the norm. Almost every blu ray carries a dts track.


DTS, I get your point, I do think that is still a glaring omission, but there seems to be no reason that existing hardware can't support it with a future update. Unlike voice assistant support, which is hardware dependent, DTS is independent of new hardware like BEAM.

DTS it's not a feature that requires new hardware to enable it, so it's simply irrational for people to have expected that DTS support would magically come with the launch of a new hardware product.

It's also not a "missed opportunity" as the opportunity has nothing to do with the launch of BEAM and is, in fact, still there.

but as a home theatre one stop shop it’s lacking and has been for years.


Correct. It also makes a poor toaster oven.

At no point have I seen Sonos claim to be, or express a desire to be either a toaster oven manufacturer or a "home theatre one stop shop". Full-on Home Theatre is a very complex and relatively unstable market with lots of support issues and a very demanding audience. I can see why Sonos don't want to be everything to everyone in that market.

And, frankly, it's become a niche market in home AV. I honestly don't think I've been to a home with a full-blown home theatre setup in the last decade. On the other hand plenty of my friends and family (including some recovering audiophiles and geeks) have got rid of the multitude of boxes and gadgets that were necessary 10 years ago and have a simple sound bar type setup, maybe with some discrete satellite surround speakers.

Most people have moved past the multitude of cables and the orchestration of switching required by these systems (I recall hours of programming and debugging a Phillips Pronto to make sure things would switch in the correct sequence to allow seamless switching between sources).

Besides, most of that functionality is now embedded into the TV via optical and HDMI-ARC. Yes, it's not a complete solution (optical doesn't support many audio codecs, and HDMI-ARC support for many is still spotty) but the number of people who actually care about that is close to zero.

If you do care, then you aren't Sonos's target market.

Things like multiple HDMI and source switching and Dolby Atmos are things that most people don't need.

DTS, I would love to see supported but I honestly don't see that many people complaining compared with the typical AV or vendor forum. As ever, on these forums there's a lot of posts made by a relatively small number of people.

I'm sure Sonos have the stats on DTS market share, and will consider adding it if it looks to become more prevalent an issue (which it may do now HDMI-ARC support is here; most modern TVs downsampled DTS to stereo on optical output so it was a bit moot).

Sonos's approach, to let the TV do the heavy lifting as regards source management, is the best approach for the majority of the market.

Yes simplicity is the aim, but the only way to make it completely seamless is to support every codec and every variant out there including the niche ones. In this day and age and with a product range like Sonos's that's not a viable approach. In a well engineered product, every feature (e.g. codec) has to justify it's presence.

As I said, long term support is their aim and adding features willy-nilly without the market demand just causes support and upgrade issues down the line.

And anyone who thinks Sonos are in trouble for catering to what the majority of the market actually needs and uses, really aught to think again.

Cheers,

Keith
Am I the only one who couldn’t care less about DTS or Atmos? My old DVD player gathers dust, never did make the move to Blueray, because, let’s face it, streaming is SO much simpler. Same with music, I don’t bother with CDs anymore (though I still enjoy spinning LPs, lol).

Maybe if I were a fan of the noisy action movies that I HATE in theaters (only see during the annoying trailers) because they are simply far too loud, and have no substance. As a fan of great dialog, which is delivered just fine in stereo or Dolby, I just don’t care. I suspect there are many others who agree. Certainly don’t need 9.1 channels for streaming The Marvelous Mrs Maisel, or watching Masterpiece Theatre or Doc Martin OTA.

It's true that many people here complaining (myself included) are not the target market for the Beam. However, all the 'geeks' and 'trend followers' you are referring to (the 1%), are the folks who are typically at the forefront of what will become mainstream technology


They also tend to embrace a lot of technology that falls by the wayside and never gets mainstream traction. HD-HVD? Laserdisks? DSD players? Microsoft Kinect?

Even full-blown surround systems seem to have lost favour with most people. As I mentioned in my last post, I don't see many proper 5.1 surround systems any more, yet alone 7.1.

Most people don't care!

So, that being said, I don't think it's too crazy for Sonos to listen to these boards and maybe adopt some of their requests. How could it possibly hurt? Where is the downside?


Millions of dollars of wasted investment, support issues, and even increased product complexity for something that (relatively) no-one wants.

Outside of startup mode, implementing features to appease a handful of customers is poor product engineering and galactically dumb as a product development strategy.

and they wouldn't be struggling to stay relevant when the competition is starting to seriously heat up.


I see no evidence of them "struggling to stay relevent" outside the fevered and overactive imaginations of armchair pundits.

As for laying people off, lots of companies do that as part of a growth restructuring plan. Apple, Google and Amazon have all done it recently.

And all of these companies, especially Apple, have been in the audio market for a long time. Apple was in it long before Sonos was formed.

Which leads me back to my point, why alienate (current and future) customers by not incorporating current codecs or allow for a traditional 5.1 (or 7.1) setups? Now THAT would be a differentiator from their competitors!


Because that's not their target market. If anything, adding the sort of complexity that the niche audio geeks want to see will alienate their primary customers. And lots of other people already cater for that market, so it's hardly a differentiator!

providing HDMI in a mini-playbar that can talk to 3 digital assistants in 2018 is their ground-breaking disruptor that's going to propel their revenue model - well FWIW, I think they are in big trouble.


Clearly you don't know much about Sonos's strategy then.

At no point have they expressed a desire to be "a disruptor" or claimed their products are "disruptive", and very sensibly so. Disruption is a tricky and dangerous business. Very often the people doing the disruption end up out of business.

And I'm sorry, but only someone completely clueless about marketing, consumer markets, and product development would suggest that implementing a new codec or putting an extra port or two on a device "disruption" or claim it is somehow "innovative" or different in the market.

Despite the hype from the tech press, there's almost nothing that genuinely new or "innovative" in the market Sonos occupies and there are very few opportunities for disruption in the market. It's generally a relatively slowly moving market with lots of fads and trends which come and go.

Voice assistant technology may well turn out to be a fad, but companies are pumping huge investment into it and people are buying into the technology in droves and are generally using them. Personally I don't see that going away anytime soon. And being the agnostic middle-man is a smart move IMO. It worked nicely for them in the streaming space. And I've already seen loads of reviews of devices like the Apple Homepod where the review has basically said "it's good, but you could get a better Sonos setup for the same price, and have it work with far more streaming services and not be locked into a particular voice assistant". I've seen similar discussions at my local John Lewis where the Sonos stand is next to the counter with the Homepod.

Arguably Sonos is disruptive compared with most modern consumer technology companies for having products which are stable, well supported and upgraded for many years, and which retain compatibility with older products. They are also different in that they are agnostic about services in a world where most vendors are trying tor trap you into their own ecosystem.

That's only possible with sane and careful product planning aimed at the mainstream market. People who want Dolby Atmos (as an example) may be a significant market in the future, but they aren't now. When it looks like they might become significant, Sonos can add that capability.

As I said, it's not a missed opportunity for Sonos if the opportunity is still there.

Cheers,

Keith
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Too many points to go over here although I do get your overall point. DTS implementation is neither new or shiney, short term, trendy or sexy. It’s the norm. Almost every blu ray carries a dts track.


DTS, I get your point, I do think that is still a glaring omission, but there seems to be no reason that existing hardware can't support it with a future update. Unlike voice assistant support, which is hardware dependent, DTS is independent of new hardware like BEAM.

DTS it's not a feature that requires new hardware to enable it, so it's simply irrational for people to have expected that DTS support would magically come with the launch of a new hardware product.

It's also not a "missed opportunity" as the opportunity has nothing to do with the launch of BEAM and is, in fact, still there.

but as a home theatre one stop shop it’s lacking and has been for years.


Correct. It also makes a poor toaster oven.

At no point have I seen Sonos claim to be, or express a desire to be either a toaster oven manufacturer or a "home theatre one stop shop". Full-on Home Theatre is a very complex and relatively unstable market with lots of support issues and a very demanding audience. I can see why Sonos don't want to be everything to everyone in that market.

And, frankly, it's become a niche market in home AV. I honestly don't think I've been to a home with a full-blown home theatre setup in the last decade. On the other hand plenty of my friends and family (including some recovering audiophiles and geeks) have got rid of the multitude of boxes and gadgets that were necessary 10 years ago and have a simple sound bar type setup, maybe with some discrete satellite surround speakers.

Most people have moved past the multitude of cables and the orchestration of switching required by these systems (I recall hours of programming and debugging a Phillips Pronto to make sure things would switch in the correct sequence to allow seamless switching between sources).

Besides, most of that functionality is now embedded into the TV via optical and HDMI-ARC. Yes, it's not a complete solution (optical doesn't support many audio codecs, and HDMI-ARC support for many is still spotty) but the number of people who actually care about that is close to zero.

If you do care, then you aren't Sonos's target market.

Things like multiple HDMI and source switching and Dolby Atmos are things that most people don't need.

DTS, I would love to see supported but I honestly don't see that many people complaining compared with the typical AV or vendor forum. As ever, on these forums there's a lot of posts made by a relatively small number of people.

I'm sure Sonos have the stats on DTS market share, and will consider adding it if it looks to become more prevalent an issue (which it may do now HDMI-ARC support is here; most modern TVs downsampled DTS to stereo on optical output so it was a bit moot).

Sonos's approach, to let the TV do the heavy lifting as regards source management, is the best approach for the majority of the market.

Yes simplicity is the aim, but the only way to make it completely seamless is to support every codec and every variant out there including the niche ones. In this day and age and with a product range like Sonos's that's not a viable approach. In a well engineered product, every feature (e.g. codec) has to justify it's presence.

As I said, long term support is their aim and adding features willy-nilly without the market demand just causes support and upgrade issues down the line.

And anyone who thinks Sonos are in trouble for catering to what the majority of the market actually needs and uses, really aught to think again.

Cheers,

Keith


Well thought out and written and the conclusion may well be correct.

But there are some glaring omissions. Omitting hdmi connectivity is just crazy if the aim is simplicity. It is the main connection mechanism on almost all equiplent. How do you connect an AppleTv 4k to a sonos device without adding extra complexity and devices? I’ve been down the very niche HT route (it took a crane to make my last HT), but I moved house ditched the warehouse of disks, racks of kit and associated expense. and wanted a simpler, more accessible solution.

I could peronally care less about atmos if it was truly going to remain a niche, but Apple will soon make it accessible to the mainstream. So not even having a route to connect a £100 mass consumer device to another cheapish mass consumer device without introducing an intermetiary device and hiding behind the banner of keeping things simple is facile. There are plenty of vendors beinging good quality wireless HT systems to the market which all support these ‘standards’,

I bought into Sonos on the basis of music firstly, but then was so impressed with the quality (it is rather good consodering how cheap the kit is) and the flexibility is fantastix. So many services - and occasioanl network jitters aside it performa very well in that regard. But the issue arises when you want Sonos in you main TV room / lounge for music but also need something that can play well with movies.

I accepted the Sonos legacy as it was. I was under no illusion that it would change for historic kit. But figured it would inevitably change as the industry moved on. Not being able to hear Blu rays or streaming services at the best quality available - all of which are mass market and not niche is frustrating for many. Years ago it would have cost the price of a small car to have hi def HT and all the bells and whistles. But now that price point has plummeted with large 4k TVs, cheap streaming aeevices are affordable audio components.

Bottom line I oersonally backed the wrong horse. And I can’t blame Sonos for that. I can express my frustration and disaapointment, but caveat emptor.

Luckily now Airplay 2 is on the horizon, so hopefully that will go some way to adress the issue. If it works well, then in theory at least it should remove the controller app and need for the HT kit to be sonos simply to maintain whole house audio. If each zonos AP2 capable zone is simply another AP2 ‘speaker’ then hopefully getting a Sonos system to play in sync with a non Sonos HT setup. If that pans out then who cares what limitations Sonos HT has? There will be a way to get a better HT as well as maintain a single source for whole house audio without having two systems in a lounge. Bottom line that’s all I personally care about.

Maintains the investment in legacy sonos kit and adresses the technology and performance gap in HT. win win for the consumer, but a loss for Sonos as they will lose out on sales to those customers and dilute brand loyalty. They may attract a much larger number of customers. But reduce the number of customers who buy LOTS of sonos Kit. The ofher vendors WILL catch up in this market. Their whole house aspect and scalability will improve. So where will Sonos be then? Competing with Apple, Amazon and Google at the lower end of the mass market being nothing much to everyone?

The original Sonos concept was niche and cutting edge 10 years ago. Today, they are still the overall best and leader IMHO, but that edge is being eroded daily. The multi room market and connected speaker market is exploding and the technology to enable it going mainstram. Eventually a player or standards based ecosystem will emerge which will mean Sonos’ key capability - scalablikity and relative simplicity will evaporate as a market edge. This will happen quicker if there are major imediments to being able to connect the equipment to mainstram standards.

I’ll probably lose no more sleep over it than a sonos exec will over my personal predicament or that of my fellow ‘wingers’. Only thing I’ll lose is a bit of time reseaching an alternative solution and a few quid. No great shakes in the grand scheme of things.

I’d be interested if there’s a thread that any if the others consodering replacing a sonos 5.1 setup - what they are considering. Cheers!
Userlevel 7
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I may have missed it, but has anyone complained about the lack of woofers in the Beam yet? I mean, even if it had atmos, it wouldn't be able to do it allthat well, right?

My point is that this clearly wasn't meant as an upgrade to the playbar or to pull in audiophiles. I agree that it's frustrating when rumors get you believing your dream product is arriving soon, but this is not it. This is designed for the folks that want a cheaper playbar with good sound and ease of use. Probably not for the main tv of a larger home. Personally, I'm thinking of putting one in the bedroom.

I don't know, but wonder if Sonos wants to leave the high end HT market to others. They seem to want to be more of a partner to them, handling streaming and control while Onkyo and others deal with the codecs and 9 + speakers. I wonder if this designed more to serve the crowd who are looking at a homepod or google max. To me anyway, this is a better deal as it does a lot of what they do plus work through the tv.
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Atmos. It won’t do more than 5.1 but Ryan has thread via tv and hdmi arc the tv will downcinvert an atmos signal to 5.1. So you can feed atmos into tv and have the Bema play audio (but in 5.1).

So you can’t use dts but can use atmos. So that is improvement from playbar/base.
Everything the HomePod should have been. This from an Apple fanzine, lol.

https://www.macworld.com/article/3279804/hardware/the-sonos-beam-is-everything-the-homepod-should-have-been.html
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My point is that this clearly wasn't meant as an upgrade to the playbar or to pull in audiophiles.


Bingo. Lower cost playbar alternative, not replacement.

Importantly it's going to be an affordable entry point for new customers.
Will the TV audio to the Beam act as a line in, like the line in on the Play5 such that you can play the TV audio as a source on on Sonos speaker?
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Can I turn off Alexa and not allow it to be turned back on with a button on the beam? With a 3 yr old and 5 yr old, I'm not ready for voice control. I suppose I could mouth the beam above the TV to avoid this. In that case, can you control Alexa from the app?
Would this integrate with a play:5 that I currently have in my living room? I've been interested in getting tv sound when watching concerts into Sonos, and have done so with old fashioned red and white RCA cables from the TV into the back of the play:5.
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Badge +22
It will most likely work like playbar in that if the beam is playing tv audio you can group with other rooms. But won’t at like andioendent input where the beam could be olayjng music and another device use the tv input.
I find it quite telling that there aren’t many “take my money now” or “pre-ordered” replies on the companies own Grand Release thread.

It's fairly clear you've not been around here that much.

Pretty much every product that Sonos has launched in the last 5 years or so has been met with a certain amount of disdain on these forums. And that's largely because Sonos tend to launch products that aren't particularly exciting or revolutionary. They are not "shiny".

But, over time, the shallow give-me-all-the-latest-trendy-technology-just-for-the-sake-of-it types (you know, the sort who think that Dolby Atmos in a one-piece soundbar is a good thing) drift away, and it turns out that Sonos have been selling bucket loads to normal people who find that the Sonos products fit their needs very well.

Because Sonos are, and always have been, in for the long-haul. More specifically, I mean they have always aimed to release products that have aren't inherently disposable, like so much of today's technology is. They aim to release products that will not only be usable, but, supported, "current" and active use in a decade's time. That's pretty much unheard of in today's market.

I put the word "current" because a small fringe of society will interpret that as having the latest trendy, news-making technical whizz-bangs. That's not what I mean. By "current" I mean stuff that's actually useful and applicable to a significant proportion of consumers (for argument's sake, let's put that at 30% of users or more). Stuff that's actually survived the early adoption curves and has become mainstream. Dolby Atmos, as an example, has not been implemented in 30% or more of homes. I would be surprised if it's in more than 1%.

Some consumer tech companies like to chase the latest and greatest partly because their company strategy is based on backing multiple horses, and partly because it's based on rapidly obsoleting products and replacing them with new ones. Shiny new technology is fun, makes news headlines, and gets geeks excited, but it rarely makes for great products that are supported (e.g. with upgrades) for more than a few years. It's not particularly good for consumers.

So Sonos's latest product doesn't deliver what you wanted. Well, that's a shame but, frankly, noone cares including, I suspect, Sonos. If you don't want what the BEAM has to offer then it's simply that you aren't in their target market. Tweakers and trend-followers have been asking for specific high-end capabilities from Sonos for years. Sonos has gone from strength to strength specifically by not being distracted by these niches and short-term trends, and by waiting to see what actually works.

It's not particularly sexy, but it does result in great products which fulfil what the vast majority of people want and need, and which continue being supported, upgraded and useful many years after you purchased them. That's something you can't say about pretty much any other digital audio vendor around.

Most of the other vendors have a track record of abandoning major product lines after a few years, leaving their customers stranded. Comparably, many of us are actively and seamlessly using Sonos equipment we purchased more than 13 years ago and which is still supported (e.g. with upgrades) today.

Cheers,

Keith


You couldn't have said it better. Yes there are fringe users that "Need" Atmos. SONOS might not be for you. But for an average user who loves quality sound from products that last, SONOS makes sense.

And I believe Beam fills a price point. 700 bucks is a LOT for a Playbar, but 400 bucks for the beam, that includes an Alexa, I think a lot of people can swallow that price point.

Also, for SONOS, if someone buys a Beam, they might later buy Play 1's for the surrounds, or buy a SUB. so Financially it makes great sense.
I think that the Beam meets my immediate requirements as I am not a Home Theatre person, but surprised it doesn't have a second HDMI port.

Along with the Beam, I thought SONOS may have also launched a replacement for the Playbar with an updated design, microphones, AirPlay2, Alexa, etc. Maybe this will come next as the Playbar is still looking a bit old and the connectivity is limited.

As for Codec support, potentially it is a cost factor to include something that most may not ever need, but maybe this could be solved with an optional paid over-the-air upgrade for the Beam, Playbase and future Playbars.
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My main disappointment is that no one from Sonos got on these forums several weeks ago and knocked the DTS, Atmos, etc. rumours on the head. May have saved a lot of angst and dissatisfaction with what the actual announcement was.

Funny how when you hear a rumour you tell yourself not to get too carried away, to wait until the actual news is official, but you still can’t help but get excited and then when the day arrives and what was rumoured is missing, well you kinda just want to unleash!

The person earlier in this thread that said it’s like being a kid at Xmas and getting a toy but not the toy you were expecting/wanting, that sums it up perfectly :)

Anyway won’t stop me from continuing to love this company and buying their products. I was one of the first Sonos customers in Australia 13yrs ago and the gear I bought then (besides the 2 controllers, cutting edge at the time, clumsy and prehistoric by today’s standards) is still working perfectly now (2 Connect Amps, 2 Connects).

The products and software updates that have followed over the years have been brilliant. Long live the king!
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My main disappointment is that no one from Sonos got on these forums several weeks ago and knocked the DTS, Atmos, etc. rumours on the head. May have saved a lot of angst and dissatisfaction with what the actual announcement was.

Funny how when you hear a rumour you tell yourself not to get too carried away, to wait until the actual news is official, but you still can’t help but get excited and then when the day arrives and what was rumoured is missing, well you kinda just want to unleash!

The person earlier in this thread that said it’s like being a kid at Xmas and getting a toy but not the toy you were expecting/wanting, that sums it up perfectly :)

Anyway won’t stop me from continuing to love this company and buying their products. I was one of the first Sonos customers in Australia 13yrs ago and the gear I bought then (besides the 2 controllers, cutting edge at the time, clumsy and prehistoric by today’s standards) is still working perfectly now (2 Connect Amps, 2 Connects).

The products and software updates that have followed over the years have been brilliant. Long live the king!


Agreed. If it had be mentioned that the upcoming release was going to be a more 'entry level' soundbar than the current range it wouldn't have attracted so much annoyance etc. For me, the current playbar and playbase were both too expensive for what they offer and this new one might just be right for me. I'm not bothered about DTS or Atmos. I recently dismantled all my proper AV setup and just want something that would give me decent 5.1
Newbie question here. I do not own any Sonos products. I have been waiting for a Sonos soundbar that supports voice control. I'm considering a Beam 5.1 setup.

I want to use the Beam to replace current 2.1 soundbar that has a lot of HDMI ports. I'm hesitating because I read the Beam only has 1 HDMI port.

Current Setup:
TV:
2016 LG OLED 65E6P TV
- 4 HDMI ports. HDMI port #2 is labeled "(ARC)"
- 1 port labeled Optical Digital Audio out
Peripherals:
2016 DirecTV 4K setup
2017 Apple TV 4K
2016 Samsung 4K BluRay Player

Is the following correct?

If I connect:
1) the Sonos Beam to my LG OLED's HDMI #2 port labeled (ARC)
2) DirecTV to HDMI #1 port
3) AppleTV to HDMI #3 port
4) Samsung 4k BluRay to HDMI #4 port

then those 3 TV peripherals's sound will use the Sonos Beam for sound because of
- the HDMI cable going between Sonos Beam LG OLED HDMI (ARC) port #2
and
- the 3 other HDMI connections between LG OLED HDMI remaining 3 ports and perpherals above

??
Userlevel 4
Badge +10
For those interested in getting a Beam, you might be happy to know that Flexson already have stand/mount accesories for it. Apparently they’re available for pre-order in time for Beam delivery. That’s quick off the mark!
Userlevel 4
Badge +10
Newbie question here. I do not own any Sonos products. I have been waiting for a Sonos soundbar that supports voice control. I'm considering a Beam 5.1 setup.

I want to use the Beam to replace current 2.1 soundbar that has a lot of HDMI ports. I'm hesitating because I read the Beam only has 1 HDMI port.

Current Setup:
TV:
2016 LG OLED 65E6P TV
- 4 HDMI ports. HDMI port #2 is labeled "(ARC)"
- 1 port labeled Optical Digital Audio out
Peripherals:
2016 DirecTV 4K setup
2017 Apple TV 4K
2016 Samsung 4K BluRay Player

Is the following correct?

If I connect:
1) the Sonos Beam to my LG OLED's HDMI #2 port labeled (ARC)
2) DirecTV to HDMI #1 port
3) AppleTV to HDMI #3 port
4) Samsung 4k BluRay to HDMI #4 port

then those 3 TV peripherals's sound will use the Sonos Beam for sound because of
- the HDMI cable going between Sonos Beam LG OLED HDMI (ARC) port #2
and
- the 3 other HDMI connections between LG OLED HDMI remaining 3 ports and perpherals above

??


You've invested in a LG OLED and 4K sources, personally I would invest in a better sound setup than a Sonos Beam. Maybe an Atmos soundbar or a Yamaha YSP-2700, both cheaper than Beam and Sub, and will sound far superior.
Userlevel 1
Badge +1
AFAIK, theres no hole on the back of the beam like the playbar, so the stand doesnt seem to be optional, IMO. There are holes under the beam, where the new stand is attached to.
Userlevel 7
Badge +17
I was hoping for DTS support for 4K discs, but no.
Atmos is covered as sonos beam will still output DD5.1, as opposed to silence with DTS or DTS:X.

Hopefully as mentioned before sonos can work on adding 4 x play1s, a sub, and a paid for software upgrade to turn the beam into a centre only channel for true 5.1 that can handle codecs on 4K discs.
Userlevel 4
Badge +10
Newbie question here. I do not own any Sonos products. I have been waiting for a Sonos soundbar that supports voice control. I'm considering a Beam 5.1 setup.

I want to use the Beam to replace current 2.1 soundbar that has a lot of HDMI ports. I'm hesitating because I read the Beam only has 1 HDMI port.

Current Setup:
TV:
2016 LG OLED 65E6P TV
- 4 HDMI ports. HDMI port #2 is labeled "(ARC)"
- 1 port labeled Optical Digital Audio out
Peripherals:
2016 DirecTV 4K setup
2017 Apple TV 4K
2016 Samsung 4K BluRay Player

Is the following correct?

If I connect:
1) the Sonos Beam to my LG OLED's HDMI #2 port labeled (ARC)
2) DirecTV to HDMI #1 port
3) AppleTV to HDMI #3 port
4) Samsung 4k BluRay to HDMI #4 port

then those 3 TV peripherals's sound will use the Sonos Beam for sound because of
- the HDMI cable going between Sonos Beam LG OLED HDMI (ARC) port #2
and
- the 3 other HDMI connections between LG OLED HDMI remaining 3 ports and perpherals above

??


You've invested in an LG OLED, personally I would invest in a better sound system than the Sonos Beam. Maybe an Atmos bar or Yamaha YSP-2700, both cheaper than Beam and Sub, and will sound better.

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