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Meet Arc, Brilliant sound for your TV

Meet Arc, Brilliant sound for your TV
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Available on June 10th, Sonos Arc is the premium smart soundbar for TV, movies, music, gaming, and more. Arc brings brilliant surround sound in 3D, along with immersive music, elegant design, and voice control built in. Experience shows, films, and games with the precise and immersive sound of Dolby Atmos, and enjoy incredible sound streaming music, podcasts, and audiobooks. 

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Extraordinary sound meets elegant design

Eleven high-performance drivers, including custom elliptical woofers and precisely angled side tweeters, produce vivid detail and impressive bass for home cinema and music streaming. Arc's upward-firing drivers create a multi-dimensional soundstage that moves around you, rendering every whisper and explosion with dramatic clarity, detail, and depth. 

 

With its elongated shape, soft profile, and seamless façade, Arc discreetly mounts to the wall or sits beneath the TV without pulling focus. When mounted, a magnetic sensor detects the orientation and smartly adjusts the EQ to temper bass resonance.

 

Arc’s sound was specially tuned with the help of Oscar-winning sound engineers to emphasize the human voice so you can always follow the story. The advanced processing creates five phased-array channels that masterfully deliver sound to your ears from all directions at the exact right moment. Use enhanced Trueplay tuning technology to optimize the sound for the unique acoustics of your room, even calibrating the height channels for precise localization. 

 

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You can also make a surround sound setup with a pair of our surround capable Sonos speakers, such as a pair of Sonos Ones, or amplify it all with a Sub for an extraordinary surround experience. 

 

Some more details on Sonos Arc:

  • Simple to set-up. Plug Arc into power and then connect it to your TV using the HDMI-ARC cord. Bring your phone up to Arc to automatically pair and securely transfer WiFi credentials using near-field communication (NFC).

  • HDMI eARC. Increased bandwidth supports high-quality audio and has lip-sync compensation built in.

  • Dolby Atmos. Play Atmos and Atmos-encoded audio to play from your collection and favorite services through your TV’s HDMI ARC or eARC connection.

  • Ambient light sensor. Arc detects how bright the room is and automatically adjusts the brightness of the LEDs to be visible but not distracting.

  • Automatic remote sync. Arc connects to your TV's HDMI eARC port with a single cable and automatically syncs with your remote.

  • Control your way. Control Sonos Arc with your voice, the Sonos app, your existing TV remote, your favorite music service’s app, or AirPlay 2. Capacitive touch controls for play, pause, skip tracks, adjust the volume, and group rooms just by tapping or swiping the top of the soundbar. LED indicates status, mute status and voice feedback.

  • Smart voice recognition. A four far-field microphone array used for advanced beamforming and multichannel echo cancellation makes sure you’re heard, even when the music is blasting, even when playing in immersive surround sound. For privacy, turn the microphone off with a tap. The LED light is hardwired and will always indicate if the microphones are enabled or if your voice assistant of choice isn't listening.

  • Optimized for your listening. From within the Sonos App, tap Speech Enhancement so you never miss a word, or Night Sound to amplify quiet noises and reduce loud ones so you can enjoy late night TV without waking the entire house.

  • Tune with Trueplay. Trueplay puts the speaker-tuning capability of the pros in the palm of your hands, adapting and optimising the sound of the speaker to the unique acoustics of the room. iOS device required.

  • Low profile and compact size. The dimensions are 3.4 x 45 x 4.5 inches (87 x 1141.7 x 115.7 mm) H x W x D and Arc weighs 13.78 lbs (6.25 kg).

Pre-order today on Sonos.com in stunning black with matte finish or white with matte finish for $799 US (€899 EUR, €799).

We’ve announced details for the Sonos Five and new Sonos Sub. You can also check out our blog for some great stories.


431 replies

I've had confirmation from LG that my TV doesn't support Atmos pass-through via the sets HDMI-ARC socket.

I'm looking to buy an Amazon Fire Cube here in the UK as it's one of only a few streaming devices that supports Atmos from Netflix as Netflix is my main source for content.

So that I can get the Atmos signal to the Sonos Arc would I be able to have a HDMI cable from the Fire Cube to a splitter with 1 HDMI coming out and going to the TV with another coming out and going to the ARC?

Would this allow me to get the Atmos signal to the ARC?

Would this cause any kind of sync issue between sound and display?

Thanks guys, really want to the ARC but not sure if I can justify it unless I'm going to get Atmos without having to buy a new TV.

 

Which LG set do you own? Because here I read the following:

https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/lg/c8-oled


Update 02/27/2019: While the TV doesn't support Atmos passthrough via a Dolby TrueHD carrier signal (common in Blu-ray disks), it is advertised as supporting Atmos passthrough via Dolby Digital Plus, which is the Atmos format used by some sources like Netflix; our testing confirmed this passthrough on the LG C8.

I wouldn’t think so, given appropriate/equivalent spacing. There are no downward firing speakers. But, given that none of us own one yet, it’s pure speculation. 

Is there any inherent advantage to wall mounting the Arc versus sitting it on credenza or shelf below the TV screen?

Will this setup shield <> TV <> ARC also pass lossless atmos (local content) ? What do I need to look on the tv regarding passthrough codecs? Is simply having eARC HDMI in enough?

 

It depends on the TV, but if it does have eARC, odds are very high that it will.  ARC is a little iffy. 

Depends on your TV, not the Sonos. Check with the manufacturer of your TV set. 

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Will this setup shield <> TV <> ARC also pass lossless atmos (local content) ? What do I need to look on the tv regarding passthrough codecs? Is simply having eARC HDMI in enough?

The lack oh HDMI input on ARC poses a lot of limitations. No TV will ever offer more versatility than an external streamer/player (like shield). Too bad there is no hdmi in. Still looking for workarounds to pull the trigger on ARC

 

You can still use an external streamer.  You would connect the streamer to the HDMI input on the TV, and the Arc to the HDMI-ARC output on the TV.  

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The lack oh HDMI input on ARC poses a lot of limitations. No TV will ever offer more versatility than an external streamer/player (like shield). Too bad there is no hdmi in. Still looking for workarounds to pull the trigger on ARC

Go the other way… The new Nebula Cosmos 4K projector (Indiegogo) will be able to support eARC and it has two HDMI so you can connect AppleTV or Fire TV cube to one port and use the eARC HDMI slot for Sonos ARC. Expensive solution but on the other hand you can enjoy native 4K and Dolby Atmos 🙂 Time to upgrade….  

I might just buy a cheap 43’ Samsung TU8000 put it to the side and dim it, then use a splitter to feed that and the projector. Then the Samsung feeds the Arc with it’s eArc. Oh this is what it takes to get Sonos Arc to work in a proper HT setup. lol

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@Ryan S

I noticed you mentioned the Arc needs about 10-15cm distance from the TV and to the sides. Does that count for the bottom also when wall mounted?

My Arc will be mounted about 10cm below the TV, but perhaps only 5cm above the credenza (I prefer wall mounting to hide cables and such).

Or would it be better to raise the TV a little, having 10cm above and below the Arc?

Also, when will the manual for both the Arc and its mount be online? I'd like to plan ahead. Or do we really need to wait until the 10th of June?

That setup should be just fine without moving the TV. There isn’t the same minimum distance guidance below the Arc when mounted.

Go the other way… The new Nebula Cosmos 4K projector (Indiegogo) will be able to support eARC and it has two HDMI so you can connect AppleTV or Fire TV cube to one port and use the eARC HDMI slot for Sonos ARC. Expensive solution but on the other hand you can enjoy native 4K and Dolby Atmos 🙂 Time to upgrade….  

Is there an HDMI-ARC to HDMI-ARC splitter on the market?I done a quick Google search and they do come up just not sure if they ACTUALLY do the job in reality. If anyone's got any recommendations re a splitter that will work or any other wiring set up that would get me Atmos from an Amazon Fire Cube when my TV doesn't allow pass-through?

Actually it’s not so much a splitter as an HDMI-ARC (or eARC) generator that’s required. It would have to extract the audio off an HDMI input -- from, say, a Fire Cube -- and embed that onto an HDMI-ARC/eARC ‘input’, and thus return it to the Arc’s ‘output’.

Go back through this thread and you’ll find various sub-discussions about this. To date nobody appears to have found such a device.

There does appear to be a device which can take PCM/DD audio off an optical input and embed that in ARC, but that’s of no use if one wants the full Atmos/DD+ audio from an HDMI.

Is there an HDMI-ARC to HDMI-ARC splitter on the market?I done a quick Google search and they do come up just not sure if they ACTUALLY do the job in reality. If anyone's got any recommendations re a splitter that will work or any other wiring set up that would get me Atmos from an Amazon Fire Cube when my TV doesn't allow pass-through?

 

There are plenty of splitters that have an HDMI-ARC feature, but with the exception of the ARC01 which doesn’t help with Atmos, the existing devices take an ARC signal from a TV and pass it on to a different device...again not helpful for Atmos.  The only device I know of that can take convert an Atmos format signal from a Cube or other source to HDMI-ARC, is a TV.  It does not have to be the TV your watching though.

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So that I can get the Atmos signal to the Sonos Arc would I be able to have a HDMI cable from the Fire Cube to a splitter with 1 HDMI coming out and going to the TV with another coming out and going to the ARC?

Unfortunately not. That would only deliver a standard HDMI to the Arc, when what it needs is an HDMI-ARC (or HDMI-eARC). The latter puts the Audio Return Channel on physically different pins.

A splitter would only be able to connect to an HDMI input. Technically the HDMI socket on the Arc is an output, since it’s designed to connect to an HDMI-ARC input on a TV.

Is there an HDMI-ARC to HDMI-ARC splitter on the market?I done a quick Google search and they do come up just not sure if they ACTUALLY do the job in reality. If anyone's got any recommendations re a splitter that will work or any other wiring set up that would get me Atmos from an Amazon Fire Cube when my TV doesn't allow pass-through?

 

TIA

 

So that I can get the Atmos signal to the Sonos Arc would I be able to have a HDMI cable from the Fire Cube to a splitter with 1 HDMI coming out and going to the TV with another coming out and going to the ARC?

Unfortunately not. That would only deliver a standard HDMI to the Arc, when what it needs is an HDMI-ARC (or HDMI-eARC). The latter puts the Audio Return Channel on physically different pins.

A splitter would only be able to connect to an HDMI input. Technically the HDMI socket on the Arc is an output, since it’s designed to connect to an HDMI-ARC input on a TV.

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Hoping this post gets noticed by @JeffDs

I’m in a similar boat to you, with an Arc on the way and a non-ARC projector as my display. I see you managed to order the ARC-01 device, but I can’t see if you’ve received it and it’s working? I also can’t quite work out what the benefit of this device is vs an Optical Audio Extractor… does ARC get you more than DD5.1, even if you can’t get full Atmos?

Finally, how much did it cost you? 

My goal was to getting CEC working for volume without relying on IR. I haven’t accomplished that yet (likely due to other issues in my setup; but not at that location right now so I haven’t messed with it in a while). In this case there is no audio quality advantage; but the device existing proves that the functionality is quite viable - just likely not in high demand. For the Sonos Arc the real desire is a similar solution supporting eARC via pure-HDMI.

 

Cost was about $40 for the unit and another $40 for shipping (the downside of having to order from overseas).

Thanks for the reply. So I can live without this for now - especially as I’ll be using a Logitech Harmony for volume control - but hopefully the right product comes along soon enough. Good luck with your CEC!

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Hey people

Apologies if this has been covered before but I need it laid out in simple terms as I'm not the most technically minded.

I've had confirmation from LG that my TV doesn't support Atmos pass-through via the sets HDMI-ARC socket.

I'm looking to buy an Amazon Fire Cube here in the UK as it's one of only a few streaming devices that supports Atmos from Netflix as Netflix is my main source for content.

So that I can get the Atmos signal to the Sonos Arc would I be able to have a HDMI cable from the Fire Cube to a splitter with 1 HDMI coming out and going to the TV with another coming out and going to the ARC?

Would this allow me to get the Atmos signal to the ARC?

Would this cause any kind of sync issue between sound and display?

Thanks guys, really want to the ARC but not sure if I can justify it unless I'm going to get Atmos without having to buy a new TV.

 

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Hoping this post gets noticed by @JeffDs

I’m in a similar boat to you, with an Arc on the way and a non-ARC projector as my display. I see you managed to order the ARC-01 device, but I can’t see if you’ve received it and it’s working? I also can’t quite work out what the benefit of this device is vs an Optical Audio Extractor… does ARC get you more than DD5.1, even if you can’t get full Atmos?

Finally, how much did it cost you? 

My goal was to getting CEC working for volume without relying on IR. I haven’t accomplished that yet (likely due to other issues in my setup; but not at that location right now so I haven’t messed with it in a while). In this case there is no audio quality advantage; but the device existing proves that the functionality is quite viable - just likely not in high demand. For the Sonos Arc the real desire is a similar solution supporting eARC via pure-HDMI.

 

Cost was about $40 for the unit and another $40 for shipping (the downside of having to order from overseas).

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@Ryan S

I noticed you mentioned the Arc needs about 10-15cm distance from the TV and to the sides. Does that count for the bottom also when wall mounted?

My Arc will be mounted about 10cm below the TV, but perhaps only 5cm above the credenza (I prefer wall mounting to hide cables and such).

Or would it be better to raise the TV a little, having 10cm above and below the Arc?

Also, when will the manual for both the Arc and its mount be online? I'd like to plan ahead. Or do we really need to wait until the 10th of June?

jgatie, Bruce, thank you guys, I appreciate your quick responses.

Thanks for responding. My thought was to have several rooms broadcasting the sound of a sports game, concert, DVDs etc. at parties from a single TV source, which would also be the primary surround set in one room. Is there any other way to accomplish multiple room sound, similar to music grouping “everywhere” with a single TV output? 

 

As stated, that is called grouping.  Different from the surrounds, which are bonded.  The difference is, surrounds each play a discrete channel of the 5.1 signal, whereas grouped rooms/devices all play the same thing.  

You would ‘group’ the other rooms, in the same manner as is available now. The ‘grouped’ rooms would be slightly delayed from the sound bar room for TV input, but completely in sync when playing music streams. 

I have preordered the Arc, I have multiple Sonos products, I will be using my Sub and two Play 1’s for surround set up. I have several other Ones, around the house, namely in two rooms adjacent to where the surround system will be set up. My question is, how many speakers can be added to the surround setup? I am aware that Sonos does not support 7.1, however is it possible for example, to group lets say 2-Play 1s as the rear surrounds, and then group two adjacent Ones as two more rears/sides, or just additional speakers within the surround grouping?

 

No.  One pair of surrounds only. 

Thanks for responding. My thought was to have several rooms broadcasting the sound of a sports game, concert, DVDs etc. at parties from a single TV source, which would also be the primary surround set in one room. Is there any other way to accomplish multiple room sound, similar to music grouping “everywhere” with a single TV output? 

I have preordered the Arc, I have multiple Sonos products, I will be using my Sub and two Play 1’s for surround set up. I have several other Ones, around the house, namely in two rooms adjacent to where the surround system will be set up. My question is, how many speakers can be added to the surround setup? I am aware that Sonos does not support 7.1, however is it possible for example, to group lets say 2-Play 1s as the rear surrounds, and then group two adjacent Ones as two more rears/sides, or just additional speakers within the surround grouping?

 

No.  One pair of surrounds only. 

I have preordered the Arc, I have multiple Sonos products, I will be using my Sub and two Play 1’s for surround set up. I have several other Ones, around the house, namely in two rooms adjacent to where the surround system will be set up. My question is, how many speakers can be added to the surround setup? I am aware that Sonos does not support 7.1, however is it possible for example, to group lets say 2-Play 1s as the rear surrounds, and then group two adjacent Ones as two more rears/sides, or just additional speakers within the surround grouping?

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