Introducing Trueplay and the New PLAY:5

  • 29 September 2015
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242 replies

Probably because it occupies the "Play5" slot in the lineup. It is replacing the old Play5 so retains the name as the "current" Play5.
Replacing was done with a name change in the past for zp90 and zp120, so that isn't the reason.

Keeping the play 5 name for what is a new product is going to cause confusion for some time, for sure. New play 5 will need to be the clunky name for some time to get over that.

The zp90 replaced the zp80 and the zp120 replaced the zp100. Replacement caused a change of name, so not doing so for a play 5 replacement doesn't have Sonos history behind it.
I'd think that the new 5 is as much a new product as the 90 and 120 were, compared to the 80 and 100 they replaced, and if they earned a new name, so does the 5.

Maybe they did it because there is no other Play:5 any more. Google did the same thing with the Nexus 7. The new one grew a rear facing camera, double RAM, about 50% improvement on resolution, battery, and a faster CPU. It was still called a Nexus 7..
The new one grew a rear facing camera, double RAM, about 50% improvement on resolution, battery, and a faster CPU. It was still called a Nexus 7..
Resulting in there no longer being a common understanding across people using the label "Nexus 7", as to what object are they talking about. That's the only thing some of us here seem to think will be an avoidable issue.
On the other hand, there obviously must be some benefits in staying with Play 5...or Nexus 7. What are these?
Quote from a tech radar review, on the name subject:
"Interestingly, on the unit I played with the words 'Encore' were stamped across the back, leading me to believe that Sonos may have been thinking of releasing this as an entirely new product range. Given the changes, it would have had every right to."
On the naming of the new PLAY:5

Probably because it occupies the "Play5" slot in the lineup. It is replacing the old Play5 so retains the name as the "current" Play5.

This is basically right on the spot. We didn't want to confuse anyone and change up the naming scheme. We weren't going to be making more of the old PLAY:5, so if it were to be named the PLAY:6 (for example) our lineup would become the PLAY:1, PLAY:3 and PLAY:6. I know some people wouldn't care, but the symmetry/sequence crushing change would upset just the right people here.



So instead, we now have two completely different units, with different facilities and connectivity - called exactly the same thing...

And that's not confusing????
At least add a 2.0 after the name to differentiate it. Ordering online somewhere will be a treat, and no telling what version you're going to get in the shipping box. Amazon shows it as 'discontinued by manufacturer.'
At least add a 2.0 after the name to differentiate it.
That would differentiate it from the Play:1 & the Play:3, whereas maybe it has much in common with the tech in those devices (ie. WiFi capabilities, and CPU & memory headroom).
When is TruePlay expected? With the next update that fixes bugs iOS9 caused?
I like the guys that buy it and use it for years and then discover it doesn't do something they think it should, and then bash Sonos continuously because their bizarre feature isn't ever included in an update. Or say how they will never recommend Sonos because a feature doesn't work the way it does on some non-Sonos gear.
Is it really missing or 'solvable' if it wasn't intended nor there to begin with?
I agree. Guess I was stating that if they add it, great... if they don't, how can people be annoyed with them? I'd love to see the 65K barrier shattered, but I've worked around it and live with it. When I started with Sonos, that limit was 30K, so they more than doubled my initial capacity. I'm still hopeful for a fix, but I'm not going to bash them because of the lack of one. Technically, it's my problem... not theirs.
I agree. Guess I was stating that if they add it, great... if they don't, how can people be annoyed with them? I'd love to see the 65K barrier shattered, but I've worked around it and live with it. When I started, that limit was 30K, so they more than doubled my capacity. I'm still hopeful of a fix, but I"m not going to bash them because of the lack of one. Technically, it's my problem... not theirs.

My grumble is the removed headphone socket which in all fairness was in the gen 1 model, but the 65k barrier for me went away a few years back as better streaming services came on-line and as said I could plug headphone into my iPad. It would have been nice to have more inputs like a combo analogue / optical 3.5mm but Sonos clearly have a direction they are taking us.

Anyway a pair of gen 2 Play 5's sound like they could be fantastic. As they can be used as rears with a Playbar then I would hope that there is going to be some development in that area 😉
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Has there been any official comment as to why Trueplay isn't available for Playbar?
Shame this announcement didn't come 5 days ago before I decided to invest in BlueSound. The Play 5 I was testing was terrible for music that required good punch at high volume (Rock, metal) where the bass would just fall away. I had contacted Sonos a month ago to ask if there was any new product coming due to my experience and they couldn't tell me.

I hope they update their entire product line to bring the connect amp etc in line with BlueSound levels of quality. If that happens before I start buying more BlueSound gear I might be persuaded to shift.

Either way, Sonos' app and setup was FAR superior to BlueSound. I'd never experienced anything so painful as the BS setup.
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Soong. Yes Ryan has mentioned that audio correction in home theater environment is a much more complicated animal. He didn't rule out that it would never come.

I hope they update their entire product line to bring the connect amp etc in line with BlueSound levels of quality.

The Connect Amp performs as well as any other audio 2 channel amp of 55wpc, what kind of update are you looking for? And with products such as better play units that will be on the roadmap, I can't see Sonos now making another version of it. One thing that they may perhaps be able to do is allow it to play in bridged mode and be able to be stereo paired with another such that those that must have more power can get a 110wpc solution for speakers that need that kind of power.
Soong. Yes Ryan has mentioned that audio correction in home theater environment is a much more complicated animal. He didn't rule out that it would never come.
Trueplay also is meant to cater to poorly and uniquely placed units whose installed audio performance is affected by that. I would expect most play bars to be placed in a common position under or above a TV set and therefore delivering much more similar sound across the installed base, leaving less for Trueplay to accomplish. Which also is why it may be a second phase thing. Or improvements may be deliverable uniformly via software upgrades the way the play 1 sound was tweaked in version 5.4.

I hope they update their entire product line to bring the connect amp etc in line with BlueSound levels of quality. If that happens before I start buying more BlueSound gear I might be persuaded to shift.


Key things I would like to see in a new Connect Amp are:

Headphone Jack

Ability to configure for summed Mono output

Some additional configurable hard buttons to allow quick access to favorite playlists or stations without opening an app (or a small IR remote with those buttons)

12V trigger in and out for integration with source components and automation controllers

Ability to configure the LED to go dim or off in standby and on bright when active

Local mute that mutes just that player (not all grouped players), shows muted status in controllers, and returns to previous level when unmuted. This does not need to be a dedicated button but the functionality needs to be there.
Existing hardware will not be upgraded to include new components. Software yes, but never hardware. It would need to be a whole new product like the Play:5 (lol).
Existing hardware will not be upgraded to include new components. Software yes, but never hardware. It would need to be a whole new product like the Play:5 (lol).

I guess I read "update their entire product line" to mean a hardware refresh as was done with the Play5.
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A 'mono mode' option on the CONNECT:AMP (and the CONNECT as well) would be fantastic, but that's a software feature and not something that needs a new physical model. You would tick a checkbox in the room settings and then their DSP would sum the audio to mono before sending it to the DACs to output the same signal to both the left and right speaker terminals. Unfortunately, in the main feature request thread for 'mono mode' on these forums, people got all kinds of greedy, wanting it to make the left and right each into a separate zone. No. Just no. Keep it to the basic request of a checkbox to sum the outputs to the same mono signal and that'd be extremely useful for folks with bathroom/in-ceiling/whatever speakers and might actually have a chance of happening.
I agree that this is all that is really required for the mono feature and it seems simple enough that it should have been done long ago. I wonder why Sonos is resisting what would seem to be a painless "quick win" for a new feature?
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"The real value, though, lies in Trueplay. How often does a company such as Sonos make a major breakthrough in how its products work and then give that breakthrough away to its customers?"

It's actually pretty crazy not to do that. Think: MacOs, iOS, Tesla, Windows 10, Amazon Fire TV... to name just a few. Even run of the mill consumer electronics like my Blu Ray player have had major enhancements pushed to them.

Giving customers free software upgrades (especially when it's for really expensive hardware they bought from you in the first place) doesn't cost you anything, and also ensures that all your customers are on the same platform. It makes support easier, and it engenders customer loyalty. It's good business any way you look at it.

On the other hand, maxing out the software version on older hardware, or asking them to pay, annoys customers, or makes them feel like they should have waited to buy, or that they are being double-dipped, or that they are orphans. It makes support more difficult, as you have customers using multiple versions of your software. It annoys customers if you try to make them pay for an update that they know new customers get for free just because they waited longer to buy the hardware. Most hardware companies -- e.g. people who make money selling physical things, rather than licensing software -- avoid this as much as possible, and only don't give free updates when actual hardware limitations force them (e.g. the iPad 1 could not update to iOS 7 because of internal memory limits).
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These two new updates, Trueplay and Play5, are all fine and dandy, and I'll probably end up buying the new Play5, but man alive, these weren't the updates I was expecting. I read it in an earlier post in this thread - why no updates that long time users have been begging for? I think it's mostly frustrating for long time users who don't get the feature enhancements we've been wanting and living without, but I do understand Sonos has other priorities because they need to make money.

Shameless begging: pleeeeaaase allow me to create alarms with groups of speakers!