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Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected
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Sonos Port is the versatile streaming component for your stereo or receiver. Port is available in limited quantities on Sonos.com and select partner retailers from September 12th, with full availability coming January 2020.



Port is the successor to Connect, delivering richer sound and extending Sonos’ sound platform to your traditional home audio equipment. Connect Port to your traditional stereo to stream music, podcasts, audiobooks, and Internet radio on your amplified audio equipment. You can also stream vinyl, CDs, and stored audio files to other Sonos speakers around your home using the line-in connection.

With Port you can easily control your traditional speakers using the Sonos app, voice assistants when wirelessly connected to a voice-enabled device, or Apple AirPlay 2.

Port includes an updated digital-to-analog converter for clearly detailed sound along with a 12V trigger, which automatically turns on your amplifier to get music playing more reliably. Port also features a matte black finish and versatile design compatible with a standard AV rack.

Connections:



Ports and Connections:
  • Power plug.
  • One analog RCA audio line-out.
  • One digital audio (coaxial) line-out
  • One 12V trigger output.
  • One RCA line-in connection.
  • Two Ethernet ports, offering 10/100 switching.
Line-out:
Audio line-out through either analog (RCA) or digital (coaxial) to connect amplified audio equipment. You can use Port with any compatible receiver or amplifier to add Sonos streaming capabilities and group it with other Sonos speakers throughout your home. The 12V trigger automatically turns on your stereo or receiver when you hit play, so you have a more reliable way to get the music playing.

Setting up:
Port is designed to be used with your traditional sound system. Plug in the power, connect it to your WiFi network using your Sonos app, and connect Port to your devices using the analog or digital coaxial connection. See our setup guide here for more resources on setting up Sonos.

Pre-order today on Sonos.com for $399 US (€449 EUR), available in limited quantities starting September 12th. Full availability begins January 2020.

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Hi

This may already be posted here but I'm too lazy to search 132 posts 🤔. Also, I didn't want to lose my MVP rating bestowed upon me by @RUBIX2. LOL

Just installed my Port. Setup was fast and glitch free. The Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) really made a difference. I didn't notice the difference as much when I installed my Sonos One (Gen2) speaker. In fact the Sonos App will ask you to turn on BT on your device if it's off. Cool 😎

In case anyone is interested I'm posting pics of the Sonos Amp and Port for a size comparison. Who am I kidding...I just wanted to show'em off 😊. I used a red backdrop for contrast as my entertainment center has a smoke glass top. Enjoy!

Edit:
I'm using the port with a CD player as I have a lot of 'em (CD's). I can't say for sure...but the signal to the auto-play room speakers may be just a tad faster. As far as the improved DAC's are concerned I have no clue if there is an audible difference. Besides I've never owned (or had access to) the proper equipment to analyze noise in the frequency response. Neither on my old Connect (which I sold) nor this new Port. I'll just have to take Sonos at their word that the DAC's are improved. Had they mentioned that the new DAC's are Burr/Brown (or something) as opposed to whatever were in the Connect then there might be grounds for a conversation 😎.

Cheers!

That’s not a bad idea, I could then get another 3 Ports to replace my Connects, it’s a £1 weekend on eBay this week..

I wonder how much Connects go for now? They were about £150-190
My Port plugs in to a Chord Hugo TT. Unless their is news that it will eventually play high res I don’t see much point in keeping it.
Yes, I too would be inclined to dispose of the DAC. The ~£1.5k they fetch on eBay could be put to good use.
Given that you have exposed the myth that people that people can hear the difference between commodity DACs, why cllng on to the myth that they can hear the difference between CD quality and HiRes?
My Port has been plugged in for over a week now and as it’s hidden it’s exactly the same as the Connect it replaced.

the only difference I noticed, which may just be an illusion is that music starts playing instantly when I choose a track (tidal) it seems slightly quicker, as for sound quality I can hear no difference.

My Port plugs in to a Chord Hugo TT. Unless their is news that it will eventually play high res I don’t see much point in keeping it.
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Just received my Port today! ........
Now, to get my Moves delivered ☺


Cheers!


You are the board MVP😀 Nice initial impressions of the Port and looking forward to your impression of the Move.
I don't want to trash the article, but be sure to read through the comments too. While it is clear that any spurious output from the equipment that he measured is near the threshold of what can be observed with current technology, he is mostly comparing results while using a switch mode power supply driven by the power line with a switch mode power supply driven by a battery.
Archimago measures switching mode PS vs battery. Bottom line: makes zero difference.

http://archimago.blogspot.com/2019/07/measurements-switching-power-supplies.html
On-board switch mode power supplies might cause issues if poor ground design rules are used. This is very unlikely with external PSU's.

If the switching frequency is low enough, some (very young) listeners might be able hear the unit's acoustic output. When I was very young and switch mode power supplies were somewhat crude compared to modern designs, I was very annoyed by some products that had nothing to do with audio. I would complain to the adults who couldn't hear anything and gave me that "er ... kid, you are daft -- we can't hear anything" stare. (probably, both points were true)
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In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunkUnless you happen to be a bat. Maybe.

Actual Batman here. Can confirm.
In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunk
Unless you happen to be a bat. Maybe.
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The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.


@VeroGuy

Here ya go...these are USA

Output = 12v = 1A
Input = 100 -240V 50/60Hz 0.4A

Cheers!
Year ago, forum member Majik linked to an experiment that sought to prove/disprove various audio tweaks/myths. Switched vs linear PSUs was one of those myths. The experiment consisted of recording the analog waveform of a system using the stock switched PSU, then recording with the linear PSU. The latter waveform was then reversed, and combined with the former. Thus everything alike between the two was cancelled out and the resulting waveform was the difference. The resulting "waveform" was inaudible, meaning any difference between the two was inaudible, even when isolated from the source.

In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunk (as is most audiophile pseudo-science).

audiophile obsessions


Yeah. At this point, I can't be helped... I BELIEVE!!! 😃
It's fair if you don't know (or beleive) about possible high-frequency noise caused by switch-mode power supplies, nor the potential benefits of using linear power supplies instead.

From my experience, there is a chance that an LPS with the new Port product would improve it's sonic qualities well beyond its price point. My question is to assess if the stock PS specs would allow me to try the Port with one of my current LPS.

I see. Thankfully I left behind such audiophile obsessions some years ago, having at one time spent an unconscionable sum of money on isolating transformers and the like. I'm sure Sonos will however have taken due care and attention in the design of the electronics, as they have traditionally done. Perhaps @AjTrek1 will be able to satisfy your curiosity, though quite why it would at this stage affect a purchasing decision baffles me.

Why on earth does it matter? It plainly delivers sufficient power for what is manifestly an undemanding network appliance (it contains no power amplification). Are you contemplating replacing the PSU with a third party, unapproved, alternative? How would you assess whether the stock PSU was, or was not, up to scratch anyhow?


I'm somewhat curious as to why you appear bothered by the question.

It's fair if you don't know (or beleive) about possible high-frequency noise caused by switch-mode power supplies, nor the potential benefits of using linear power supplies instead.

From my experience, there is a chance that an LPS with the new Port product would improve it's sonic qualities well beyond its price point. My question is to assess if the stock PS specs would allow me to try the Port with one of my current LPS.
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@danjrichards

The Sonos Amp and The Port are not apples to apples although they do share a few similarities.

The Sonos Amp (IMO) is first used to power 3rd part speakers and just happens to accommodate a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player as examples. It can also be used in a HT setup to power 3rd party L/R front speakers and create a phantom center channel. Sonos speakers can be bonded to it as surrounds in a HT setup or you can use it to power 3rd party speakers as surrounds. It also has HDMI-ARC capability for connection to a compatible TV. Bottom-line the Sonos Amp is all about POWER.

The Port is designed to bring Sonos to an AVR via RCA input or send audio from a Turntable or CD player connected to an AVR via RCA output to other Sonos speakers. It can also act as a stand-alone component to a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player to send audio to other Sonos speakers. Not to forget...you can connect 3rd party powered speakers via line-in to send Sonos audio to them. There are other unorthodox ways to use the Port as well. Just requires thinking outside the box (no pun intended).

I hope this helps. Cheers!

The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.

Why on earth does it matter? It plainly delivers sufficient power for what is manifestly an undemanding network appliance (it contains no power amplification). Are you contemplating replacing the PSU with a third party, unapproved, alternative? How would you assess whether the stock PSU was, or was not, up to scratch anyhow?
The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).

Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.
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Anyway, I'll probably connect it over the weekend to my 4K Player's RCA outputs to engage CD playback and designate an auto play room (Play 5 x 2 with Sub). The provided RCA cables look nice (same as shown in marketing photos) but I'll probably use AudioQuest Evergreen RCA's instead. I'll let you know how things sort out.

Thanks for sharing. Eager to know your thoughts once you've set it up.

Or any feedback on my questions regarding Port/Amp above. Cheers.
Or, perhaps a better answer, no, there is no need to have a pre-amp in between the Port and a normal input on your amp. Just do not use the phono input.
The Port takes a line level input. Basically what you would get out of any RCA jack on a receiver. The only time you would need a pre-amp would be if you were plugging a phono turntable into it.
Can I plug the port directly into a power amplifier - or does it need a pre-amp/integrated amplifier to work effectively?

Dave
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Just received my Port today! Had it delivered to my job. Boy is it tiny compared to the old Connect. Although that's not a bad thing.

It's very light weight and extremely compact. I assume the casing materials used contribute to the weight reduction. As the color is the same as the Sonos Amp I would assume it also reduces and/or dissipates heat more efficiently.

The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US). As stated in @Ryan S release notes there are no volume controls. I guest moving the voltage regulator outboard and the volume controls completely allowed Sonos to work some internal magic to reduce the Port in size compared to the Connect.

Haven't decided if I will use the 12v trigger. Would have been nice if Sonos had supplied a 6 foot cable. I don't see a problem with the switch from optical to coaxial out as there are plenty of convertors to be had if needed.

Anyway, I'll probably connect it over the weekend to my 4K Player's RCA outputs to engage CD playback and designate an auto play room (Play 5 x 2 with Sub). The provided RCA cables look nice (same as shown in marketing photos) but I'll probably use AudioQuest Evergreen RCA's instead. I'll let you know how things sort out.

Now, to get my Moves delivered ☺

Cheers!

What are the specs of the Port power supply?The user guide can be found here: Manual
However, it only says to use the included power supply (not power cord like the others), Auto-switching 100 - 240V, 50-60 Hz AC universal input.


Thanks. I read that the Port comes with a wall wart power supply. If so, these are usually switch mode power supplies, and have specs like 12v/5amps. Perhaps, I'm wrong, and it's not a wall wart type power supply, but just a cable (and a internal power supply).

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