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Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

  • 5 September 2019
  • 255 replies
  • 33248 views
Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected
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Sonos Port is the versatile streaming component for your stereo or receiver. Port is available in limited quantities on Sonos.com and select partner retailers from September 12th, with full availability coming January 2020.



Port is the successor to Connect, delivering richer sound and extending Sonos’ sound platform to your traditional home audio equipment. Connect Port to your traditional stereo to stream music, podcasts, audiobooks, and Internet radio on your amplified audio equipment. You can also stream vinyl, CDs, and stored audio files to other Sonos speakers around your home using the line-in connection.

With Port you can easily control your traditional speakers using the Sonos app, voice assistants when wirelessly connected to a voice-enabled device, or Apple AirPlay 2.

Port includes an updated digital-to-analog converter for clearly detailed sound along with a 12V trigger, which automatically turns on your amplifier to get music playing more reliably. Port also features a matte black finish and versatile design compatible with a standard AV rack.

Connections:



Ports and Connections:
  • Power plug.
  • One analog RCA audio line-out.
  • One digital audio (coaxial) line-out
  • One 12V trigger output.
  • One RCA line-in connection.
  • Two Ethernet ports, offering 10/100 switching.
Line-out:
Audio line-out through either analog (RCA) or digital (coaxial) to connect amplified audio equipment. You can use Port with any compatible receiver or amplifier to add Sonos streaming capabilities and group it with other Sonos speakers throughout your home. The 12V trigger automatically turns on your stereo or receiver when you hit play, so you have a more reliable way to get the music playing.

Setting up:
Port is designed to be used with your traditional sound system. Plug in the power, connect it to your WiFi network using your Sonos app, and connect Port to your devices using the analog or digital coaxial connection. See our setup guide here for more resources on setting up Sonos.

Pre-order today on Sonos.com for $399 US (€449 EUR), available in limited quantities starting September 12th. Full availability begins January 2020.

255 replies

Dear Sonos what is the sunset date for software updates for the Port?

 

Thanks

At least 5 years after it stops being sold. 

Thanks for replying but you aren't a Sonos employee (I mean no disrespect)

But I am quoting what a Sonos employee stated several times in the main thread. 

 

Does a coaxial to optical converter cause a delay in the sound?

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So, how long until this one goes obsolete?  

So, how long until this one goes obsolete?  

 

Already answered above.

Does a coaxial to optical converter cause a delay in the sound?

No. At least, nothing one can notice. 

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So, how long until this one goes obsolete?  


Within the next couple of years. Calculate the annual cost on this.

Buy at own risk - Sonos will NOT support you once you bought the product.

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Given yesterdays disappointing but expected announcement,

and the underlying reason is partly due to the memory capacity of the legacy editions.
can anyone, hello @Ryan S , confirm if this means after May 2020 there will be a s/w update that allows the Port to have a larger library than the current 65K limit, as this is the only real advantage i would gain from this upgrade.

ta

m.e

 

Like ALL Sonos products you have just 5 years of updates before they retire their software support for this device from the date it was first released. Save your money look elsewhere!

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I would like to know when are sonos going to turn round and say that the connect can no longer be used on this system as it is now outdated and will not support the new software....which with all these new speakers, amps and now the Port that have been introduced just lately, I don't think it will be that long down the road.

 


Given that's it's predecessor, the ZP80 I believe it was, is still supported, I think we're at least a few years away before the Connect is no longer supported.

 


I rest my case……4 months.

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Caveat Emptor! This will soon be a legacy device and will render any other equipment you have obsolete

Buy Sonos at your peril.

I have wasted £3200 on their products buying 1 or two pieces a year. I was a believer but trust has gone. They will be bankrupt soon if the decision is not reversed

Caveat Emptor! This will soon be a legacy device and will render any other equipment you have obsolete

Buy Sonos at your peril.

I have wasted £3200 on their products buying 1 or two pieces a year. I was a believer but trust has gone. They will be bankrupt soon if the decision is not reversed

 

Sonos stated they will provide support for products for at least 5 years after they are released.  In most cases, it has been much longer than that.    Since the Port was released last fall, you have at least 4.5 years of support minimum.

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Given yesterdays disappointing but expected announcement,

and the underlying reason is partly due to the memory capacity of the legacy editions.
can anyone, hello @Ryan S , confirm if this means after May 2020 there will be a s/w update that allows the Port to have a larger library than the current 65K limit, as this is the only real advantage i would gain from this upgrade.

ta

m.e

 

The software team is excited to have more memory and higher minimum specifications to work with, but all new features they want to add will need to be prioritized until they hit the new lowest bar of existing hardware that’s supported fully. There’s no announced plan right now for an increase to that index size, but I’ll be sure to let them know we have people on the community asking for it. 

 

Like ALL Sonos products you have just 5 years of updates before they retire their software support for this device from the date it was first released. Save your money look elsewhere!

Though this isn’t really on topic, our commitment is at least 5 years of updates after the device is no longer sold. So you’ll have at least 5 years of software support from some date in the future years from now when we stop selling the Port. And even after software updates stop, it’ll still keep working as it did before updates stopped.

I would like to know when are sonos going to turn round and say that the connect can no longer be used on this system as it is now outdated and will not support the new software....which with all these new speakers, amps and now the Port that have been introduced just lately, I don't think it will be that long down the road.

 


Given that's it's predecessor, the ZP80 I believe it was, is still supported, I think we're at least a few years away before the Connect is no longer supported.

 


I rest my case……4 months.

 

That’s actually not 100% true.  What you (I assume) and I did not know was there was a change in hardware for the Connect back in 2015, which is now the dividing point for what is and is not supported.  A Connect that was bought within the past few years is still supported, and I still say is a least a few years away. Sonos probably does not want to have a repeat of the current event any time soon.

 

That said, had I known there were 2 hardware versions of the Connect out there, not sure I would have changed my statement/prediction, still expecting the ZP80 to go first, then the first version of Connect, and so on.  So I probably would have been wrong on that point.  

….

Ports and Connections:

 

  • Power plug.
  • One analog RCA audio line-out.
  • One digital audio (coaxial) line-out
  • One 12V trigger output.
  • One RCA line-in connection.
  • Two Ethernet ports, offering 10/100 switching.

 

Why on earth is the Sonos Port still equipped with just 10/100 Ethernet????
This caused issue with my older Connect in two installations and among the other design/build choice for this model that I cannot understand, this one baffles me a bit more. Clearly Gigabit is overkill for audio streaming, but given this is a passthrough Ethernet and the Port/Connect lives in and amongst other Ethernet connected devices for which the passthrough could/should be quite useful, it’s instead crippled and unusable in many instances, particularly if it’s meant to be “installer friendly” where the single run’s bandwidth can get further consumed if the devices are run several in tandem.
Gigabit Ethernet is ubiquitous and cheap these days. For a 2019/2020 product refresh it’s just “cheap” and in no way what I’d have expected from Sonos.

I own a soon-to-be-defunct Connect and would like to know if both the analogue and digital outputs on the Port are active at the same time, as they are in the Connect?

I haven’t set this up yet on my Connect but will want to be able to use the Port to play music on two amplifiers in different rooms at the same time. Is this supported on the Port? My potential “trade-up” puchase decision depends on the answer.

I own a soon-to-be-defunct Connect and would like to know if both the analogue and digital outputs on the Port are active at the same time, as they are in the Connect?

I haven’t set this up yet on my Connect but will want to be able to use the Port to play music on two amplifiers in different rooms at the same time. Is this supported on the Port? My potential “trade-up” puchase decision depends on the answer.

 

Yes, they are.  It is missing the optical output, though.

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Why is the Port significantly more expensive than the old Connect?

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Still feel it is double the price it really ought to be

 

I currently connect to my Denon AVR 3500 Receiver in he Living room using one of the old connect boxes which has always worked fine.

These days if I want to play music in one room I can just as easily stream music to it via built in Chromecast or Airplay 2 from one of the streaming services.

 

£400 or even £280 with the 30 trade-in discount if I decide to ‘upgrade’ still seems grossly overpriced these days just to add back in Sonos multiroom capability.  £400 in the first place is just taking the ‘michael’ and then who knows how long before it is classed as legacy like other products.

First I saw the new Port released, but at $399, it was already $50 more than the more than the former Connect, which is overpriced to me (I bought my connect as open box at best buy for $250).  Then in December Sonos announced the price would go up to $449 two weeks later, on Jan 9th.  Finally, this week Sonos announced my old connect will no longer receive updates as well as the rest of my system it is connected to.

Now we are told they will announce a solution in May to still use the legacy products with ‘modern’ ones, in the same network.  I’m wondering what that is, and if they can make it happen.

I *may* have updated to the new port at 30% off the $399 price, but to be told no more updates AFTER the price increase leaves me a little uneasy about the future.  Sure, it would only be $35 more to upgrade at the new $449 MSRP ($314 vs $279), but it’s the principle of timing these announcements.  

 

First I saw the new Port released, but at $399, it was already $50 more than the more than the former Connect, which is overpriced to me (I bought my connect as open box at best buy for $250).  Then in December Sonos announced the price would go up to $449 two weeks later, on Jan 9th.  Finally, this week Sonos announced my old connect will no longer receive updates as well as the rest of my system it is connected to.

Now we are told they will announce a solution in May to still use the legacy products with ‘modern’ ones, in the same network.  I’m wondering what that is, and if they can make it happen.

I *may* have updated to the new port at 30% off the $399 price, but to be told no more updates AFTER the price increase leaves me a little uneasy about the future.  Sure, it would only be $35 more to upgrade at the new $449 MSRP ($314 vs $279), but it’s the principle of timing these announcements.  

 

What’s the actual date shown on the Connect?

'Is it shown as a 'modern' or legacy' version in your online Sonos Profile? 

The annoucement only applies to the older connects dated back to 2015.

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When does Sonos anticipate this being a ‘legacy’ product?

When does Sonos anticipate this being a ‘legacy’ product?

The Port is one of their latest products, released end of 2019, so as an example let’s say they continue to make/sell it until 2025, which I think is a realistic prospect. Sonos say they will support it for a further 5 years after the  final manufacturing date… so that would be 2030, at which point it would switch to legacy (out of support) mode, but it might continue to work for quite some years after that. 
 

That information is based on the current company policy and latest announcements.
 

Note we are talking customer care support here 24/7, 365 days per year.

Thanks for indulging another question from a novice here.  Given Ryan S’s statement on the first page of this thread that “We've found that Coaxial outputs can offer a higher quality of audio”, wouldn’t this mean that adding a coaxial to optical converter would make the sound worse?

Does anyone have the port setup with a receiver/amplifier or DAC that will turn on and go to the appropriate input withoug having to engage a remote?  My wife wants an option that would allow her to use this entirely within her Sonos app on her phone - she does not want to engage with another remote or app.  I would like to have the amp for other purposes (e.g. other inputs, when required), but work entirely from the Sonos application (including volume) most of the time.


Dave

Thanks for indulging another question from a novice here.  Given Ryan S’s statement on the first page of this thread that “We've found that Coaxial outputs can offer a higher quality of audio”, wouldn’t this mean that adding a coaxial to optical converter would make the sound worse?

Highly unlikely, unless you had excessively long cable runs. As a medium coax offers somewhat better jitter characteristics compared to optical, and can support longer cables. 

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