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Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

  • 5 September 2019
  • 154 replies
  • 16867 views
Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

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154 replies

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Sonos Port: Is a "mobile device" required for setup? I have a Win10 desktop and a router, streaming Qobuz via 3.5mm cable to my amp. I don't have a mobile device -- no cell phone, no smart phone, no tablet, no laptop.

So I'm out of luck vis-a-vis the Sonos Port?
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Hi Narciso, an Android or iOS device is required to set up all Sonos devices, and to configure most settings. If you don't have one in your home, you may want to look into getting an inexpensive tablet like the Amazon Fire, or maybe borrowing one from a friend for an hour to set up Sonos and maybe the settings you might need. You can find a list of all system requirements here.
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Disappointing.

Airplay2 is nice. My amps already have auto power detection based on signal that works great.

If you plan on targeting the whole house installers then you shouldn’t remove ports. I have 8 optical lines from 20-80’ wired through my attic that I’m not planning on swapping out for coax anytime soon. At least include some optical to coax adapter if you plan on removing functionality.
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Hi Narciso, an Android or iOS device is required to set up all Sonos devices, and to configure most settings. If you don't have one in your home, you may want to look into getting an inexpensive tablet like the Amazon Fire, or maybe borrowing one from a friend for an hour to set up Sonos and maybe the settings you might need. You can find a list of all system requirements here.
OK, thanks, Ryan. I can borrow my neighbor's Amazon Fire for setup. After setup, I won't need the Fire tablet, will I? I can just operate everything from the desktop?

Also, for setting up Soros products, is a laptop considered a "mobile device"? (I'm thinking about getting one for use with music only.) Thanks so much for your help!

OK, thanks, Ryan. I can borrow my neighbor's Amazon Fire for setup. After setup, I won't need the Fire tablet, will I? I can just operate everything from the desktop?

Also, for setting up Soros products, is a laptop considered a "mobile device"? (I'm thinking about getting one for use with music only.) Thanks so much for your help!


Correct, once it is set up, you can control your music playing from a desktop/laptop.

No, a laptop is not considered a mobile device. A tablet or phone are considered mobile devices. A laptop runs the same OS as a desktop 🙂
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OK, thanks, Ryan. I can borrow my neighbor's Amazon Fire for setup. After setup, I won't need the Fire tablet, will I? I can just operate everything from the desktop?

Also, for setting up Soros products, is a laptop considered a "mobile device"? (I'm thinking about getting one for use with music only.) Thanks so much for your help!
Correct, once it is set up, you can control your music playing from a desktop/laptop.

No, a laptop is not considered a mobile device. A tablet or phone are considered mobile devices. A laptop runs the same OS as a desktop :)
I have 8 optical lines from 20-80’ wired through my attic that I’m not planning on swapping out for coax anytime soon. At least include some optical to coax adapter if you plan on removing functionality.
You're lucky that the longer lines work at all. The maximum length for the S/PDIF spec is generally regarded as 10m.

As for coax-optical converters, they cost less than £15 (and probably $15).
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I can't make my mind up on the Port. I don't have a Connect, so the choice for me is between the Port or the Amp (or neither at the moment). Currently, I have two Sonos Ones in the bedroom and kitchen (mainly using Spotify and internet radio), and a non-Sonos set-up in the lounge.

Any thoughts/recommendations/similar set-ups?

Current non-Sonos lounge set-up:
For TV audio and Airplay 2: Apple TV 3 optical audio output through Cambridge Audio DAC to CA Integrated Amplifier and speakers. The Apple TV 3 is connected to the TV through HDMI with TV audio through DAC and stereo amp/speakers (Apple TV 3 has optical audio and HDMI). I have TV in stereo, and am not concerned about having surround sound.

The TV only has analogue out.

Audio Technica Turntable connected directly to CA Amp phono-in.

I'm able to play the turntable in the lounge, and use iPhone with airplay for Spotify and internet radio in the lounge.

Possible Port set-up:
As above but with Port coaxial through CA DAC to CA Amplifier to connect Sonos to the lounge speakers.

OR As above with Port RCA direct to CA Amplifier.

In both cases, the TV audio from Apple TV 3 can remain the same (DAC has optical and coaxial inputs), or use Airplay 2 to Port. I'm aware that the Port is not made for AV, but I do not have sync issues with current set-up.

With this I can:
Play the turntable on the Ones in other rooms, but not sure how much use I'd get from this.
Bring Sonos to the lounge, basically allowing us to play Spotify and internet radio without using iPhone, and have the same music or radio in three rooms without having to use two systems.

Cost: £399

Possible Amp set-up
Replace the CA amplifier with Sonos Amp
Audio Technica Turntable has built in pre-amp, so can be connected directly to Sonos Amp .

Apple TV 3 optical audio output with adaptor to Sonos Amp HDMI-in and CA speakers, or Airplay 2 to Sonos Amp.

I know the Sonos Amp has HDMI ARC, but the TV does not have HDMI or optical/digital output, and I don't plan to replace the TV for some time.

The Amp option is £200 more than Port (+£25 for optical audio adaptor). The CA amplifier would not be used for now, as I don't want to buy additional speakers and have no need for two systems in my small apartment. However, it would give a cleaner TV set-up when I (eventually) get a new TV with HDMI ARC in a few years time.

What are the specs of the Port power supply?The user guide can be found here: Manual
However, it only says to use the included power supply (not power cord like the others), Auto-switching 100 - 240V, 50-60 Hz AC universal input.


Thanks. I read that the Port comes with a wall wart power supply. If so, these are usually switch mode power supplies, and have specs like 12v/5amps. Perhaps, I'm wrong, and it's not a wall wart type power supply, but just a cable (and a internal power supply).
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Just received my Port today! Had it delivered to my job. Boy is it tiny compared to the old Connect. Although that's not a bad thing.

It's very light weight and extremely compact. I assume the casing materials used contribute to the weight reduction. As the color is the same as the Sonos Amp I would assume it also reduces and/or dissipates heat more efficiently.

The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US). As stated in @Ryan S release notes there are no volume controls. I guest moving the voltage regulator outboard and the volume controls completely allowed Sonos to work some internal magic to reduce the Port in size compared to the Connect.

Haven't decided if I will use the 12v trigger. Would have been nice if Sonos had supplied a 6 foot cable. I don't see a problem with the switch from optical to coaxial out as there are plenty of convertors to be had if needed.

Anyway, I'll probably connect it over the weekend to my 4K Player's RCA outputs to engage CD playback and designate an auto play room (Play 5 x 2 with Sub). The provided RCA cables look nice (same as shown in marketing photos) but I'll probably use AudioQuest Evergreen RCA's instead. I'll let you know how things sort out.

Now, to get my Moves delivered ☺

Cheers!
Can I plug the port directly into a power amplifier - or does it need a pre-amp/integrated amplifier to work effectively?

Dave
The Port takes a line level input. Basically what you would get out of any RCA jack on a receiver. The only time you would need a pre-amp would be if you were plugging a phono turntable into it.
Or, perhaps a better answer, no, there is no need to have a pre-amp in between the Port and a normal input on your amp. Just do not use the phono input.
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Anyway, I'll probably connect it over the weekend to my 4K Player's RCA outputs to engage CD playback and designate an auto play room (Play 5 x 2 with Sub). The provided RCA cables look nice (same as shown in marketing photos) but I'll probably use AudioQuest Evergreen RCA's instead. I'll let you know how things sort out.

Thanks for sharing. Eager to know your thoughts once you've set it up.

Or any feedback on my questions regarding Port/Amp above. Cheers.
The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).

Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.

The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.

Why on earth does it matter? It plainly delivers sufficient power for what is manifestly an undemanding network appliance (it contains no power amplification). Are you contemplating replacing the PSU with a third party, unapproved, alternative? How would you assess whether the stock PSU was, or was not, up to scratch anyhow?
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@danjrichards

The Sonos Amp and The Port are not apples to apples although they do share a few similarities.

The Sonos Amp (IMO) is first used to power 3rd part speakers and just happens to accommodate a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player as examples. It can also be used in a HT setup to power 3rd party L/R front speakers and create a phantom center channel. Sonos speakers can be bonded to it as surrounds in a HT setup or you can use it to power 3rd party speakers as surrounds. It also has HDMI-ARC capability for connection to a compatible TV. Bottom-line the Sonos Amp is all about POWER.

The Port is designed to bring Sonos to an AVR via RCA input or send audio from a Turntable or CD player connected to an AVR via RCA output to other Sonos speakers. It can also act as a stand-alone component to a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player to send audio to other Sonos speakers. Not to forget...you can connect 3rd party powered speakers via line-in to send Sonos audio to them. There are other unorthodox ways to use the Port as well. Just requires thinking outside the box (no pun intended).

I hope this helps. Cheers!

Why on earth does it matter? It plainly delivers sufficient power for what is manifestly an undemanding network appliance (it contains no power amplification). Are you contemplating replacing the PSU with a third party, unapproved, alternative? How would you assess whether the stock PSU was, or was not, up to scratch anyhow?


I'm somewhat curious as to why you appear bothered by the question.

It's fair if you don't know (or beleive) about possible high-frequency noise caused by switch-mode power supplies, nor the potential benefits of using linear power supplies instead.

From my experience, there is a chance that an LPS with the new Port product would improve it's sonic qualities well beyond its price point. My question is to assess if the stock PS specs would allow me to try the Port with one of my current LPS.
It's fair if you don't know (or beleive) about possible high-frequency noise caused by switch-mode power supplies, nor the potential benefits of using linear power supplies instead.

From my experience, there is a chance that an LPS with the new Port product would improve it's sonic qualities well beyond its price point. My question is to assess if the stock PS specs would allow me to try the Port with one of my current LPS.

I see. Thankfully I left behind such audiophile obsessions some years ago, having at one time spent an unconscionable sum of money on isolating transformers and the like. I'm sure Sonos will however have taken due care and attention in the design of the electronics, as they have traditionally done. Perhaps @AjTrek1 will be able to satisfy your curiosity, though quite why it would at this stage affect a purchasing decision baffles me.

audiophile obsessions


Yeah. At this point, I can't be helped... I BELIEVE!!! 😃
Year ago, forum member Majik linked to an experiment that sought to prove/disprove various audio tweaks/myths. Switched vs linear PSUs was one of those myths. The experiment consisted of recording the analog waveform of a system using the stock switched PSU, then recording with the linear PSU. The latter waveform was then reversed, and combined with the former. Thus everything alike between the two was cancelled out and the resulting waveform was the difference. The resulting "waveform" was inaudible, meaning any difference between the two was inaudible, even when isolated from the source.

In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunk (as is most audiophile pseudo-science).
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The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.


@VeroGuy

Here ya go...these are USA

Output = 12v = 1A
Input = 100 -240V 50/60Hz 0.4A

Cheers!
In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunk
Unless you happen to be a bat. Maybe.
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In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunkUnless you happen to be a bat. Maybe.

Actual Batman here. Can confirm.
On-board switch mode power supplies might cause issues if poor ground design rules are used. This is very unlikely with external PSU's.

If the switching frequency is low enough, some (very young) listeners might be able hear the unit's acoustic output. When I was very young and switch mode power supplies were somewhat crude compared to modern designs, I was very annoyed by some products that had nothing to do with audio. I would complain to the adults who couldn't hear anything and gave me that "er ... kid, you are daft -- we can't hear anything" stare. (probably, both points were true)

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