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Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

  • 5 September 2019
  • 255 replies
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Introducing Sonos Port, Brilliant Sound Connected

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255 replies

That’s a software limit, it isn’t affected (currently) by the speaker itself.

OK, thanks, Ryan. I can borrow my neighbor's Amazon Fire for setup. After setup, I won't need the Fire tablet, will I? I can just operate everything from the desktop?

Also, for setting up Soros products, is a laptop considered a "mobile device"? (I'm thinking about getting one for use with music only.) Thanks so much for your help!


Correct, once it is set up, you can control your music playing from a desktop/laptop.

No, a laptop is not considered a mobile device. A tablet or phone are considered mobile devices. A laptop runs the same OS as a desktop 🙂
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OK, thanks, Ryan. I can borrow my neighbor's Amazon Fire for setup. After setup, I won't need the Fire tablet, will I? I can just operate everything from the desktop?

Also, for setting up Soros products, is a laptop considered a "mobile device"? (I'm thinking about getting one for use with music only.) Thanks so much for your help!
Correct, once it is set up, you can control your music playing from a desktop/laptop.

No, a laptop is not considered a mobile device. A tablet or phone are considered mobile devices. A laptop runs the same OS as a desktop :)
There are no speakers connected to a Sonos Port. How can it support TruePlay? Any speakers would be connected to the amp that the Sonos Port is connected to.

Really shouldn't matter. Room correction depends on a DSP (which the Port surely has - it's used by all modern amps/preamps for the tone controls), a calibrated mic (the iPhone's) and a tuning process. It shouldn't depend on the speakers at all, as it simply adjusts the levels through the system (via the DSP) at multiple frequencies based on how the bleeps and blurps during the tuning process interact with the room's nodes.

I'd love to see Sonos implement it in the Port and Amp, but they don't seem interested in doing so. Marketing reasons, I'm guessing, not technical. Or legal reasons (you idiots blew up my speakers!)

Here's an example of a streamer with DSP room correction. Comes with a Windows app/calibrated mic vs an iPhone app/mic, but can be used with any amp/speaker combo.

https://www.minidsp.com/products/shd-series/shd-detail

I own a soon-to-be-defunct Connect and would like to know if both the analogue and digital outputs on the Port are active at the same time, as they are in the Connect?

I haven’t set this up yet on my Connect but will want to be able to use the Port to play music on two amplifiers in different rooms at the same time. Is this supported on the Port? My potential “trade-up” puchase decision depends on the answer.

I’ve known even short coax cables to cause problems. Always worth trying a different cable.

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Given yesterdays disappointing but expected announcement,

and the underlying reason is partly due to the memory capacity of the legacy editions.
can anyone, hello @Ryan S , confirm if this means after May 2020 there will be a s/w update that allows the Port to have a larger library than the current 65K limit, as this is the only real advantage i would gain from this upgrade.

ta

m.e

 

The software team is excited to have more memory and higher minimum specifications to work with, but all new features they want to add will need to be prioritized until they hit the new lowest bar of existing hardware that’s supported fully. There’s no announced plan right now for an increase to that index size, but I’ll be sure to let them know we have people on the community asking for it. 

 

Like ALL Sonos products you have just 5 years of updates before they retire their software support for this device from the date it was first released. Save your money look elsewhere!

Though this isn’t really on topic, our commitment is at least 5 years of updates after the device is no longer sold. So you’ll have at least 5 years of software support from some date in the future years from now when we stop selling the Port. And even after software updates stop, it’ll still keep working as it did before updates stopped.

I have ordered Sonos Port via the internet and finally received it. It has quality sound.

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As the older Connects were "bit perfect" how is this going to produce a "richer sound" without messing up the sound?

'Richer sound' refers to the analog output via the DAC, not the digital output. (FWIW, the current Connect is thought not to be 'bit perfect', not that it makes an iota of difference under practical listening conditions.)

It is also about £200 too expensive for what it does in this day and age.


Absolutely, especially as useful features have been removed compared to the Connect, and the Ethernet ports haven't been upgraded to gigabit. Plenty of very cheap devices have gigabit networking.

An Amazon Link, a not dissimilar device, is under £200.

I would like to know when are sonos going to turn round and say that the connect can no longer be used on this system as it is now outdated and will not support the new software....which with all these new speakers, amps and now the Port that have been introduced just lately, I don't think it will be that long down the road.

 


Given that's it's predecessor, the ZP80 I believe it was, is still supported, I think we're at least a few years away before the Connect is no longer supported.

 


I rest my case……4 months.

 

That’s actually not 100% true.  What you (I assume) and I did not know was there was a change in hardware for the Connect back in 2015, which is now the dividing point for what is and is not supported.  A Connect that was bought within the past few years is still supported, and I still say is a least a few years away. Sonos probably does not want to have a repeat of the current event any time soon.

 

That said, had I known there were 2 hardware versions of the Connect out there, not sure I would have changed my statement/prediction, still expecting the ZP80 to go first, then the first version of Connect, and so on.  So I probably would have been wrong on that point.  

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@Tejs Dyrvig Ernst, thanks for sharing your story. I'm pleased to confirm that we're in no way "throwing in the towel" on home theater devices. We've announced 3 new products this month, none of them happen to be specifically for home theater, though the Sonos One SL is a much needed update to the position that the Play:1 filled, as the most common surround Sonos speaker for home theater. The Beam and Amp are fairly new to our product lineup, both of them with home theater capabilities. Over HDMI, those devices will tell the TV they're connected with that they want Dolby Digital 5.1, and if there's a Dolby Digital Plus signal, it'll automatically be converted.

As to what to read into with the Port, it's a much needed update to an older product that holds an important position in our lineup. It's for people with existing audio systems that they want to be able to bring the Sonos convenience to. It also has line-in, to bring new sources of audio into the Sonos speakers you have. It's about bringing Sonos to new places, to connect.


I'd love to see Sonos implement it in the Port and Amp, but they don't seem interested in doing so. Marketing reasons, I'm guessing, not technical. Or legal reasons (you idiots blew up my speakers!)I was disappointed when I found out that the Amp did not have Trueplay, and now here we are again. It's a killer feature that would make either of these products a must-have. As it stands, I see no reason to upgrade from my current streaming setup.

To be clear, the Amp does have Trueplay when you're using it with the in-wall or in-ceiling Sonos Architectural speakers we built with Sonance. To use Trueplay, we need to have the acoustic pattern of the speakers that are being tuned. These speakers have a signature that we're able to detect and tune to the room.
The Port takes a line level input. Basically what you would get out of any RCA jack on a receiver. The only time you would need a pre-amp would be if you were plugging a phono turntable into it.
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@Tejs Dyrvig Ernst, thanks for sharing your story. I'm pleased to confirm that we're in no way "throwing in the towel" on home theater devices. We've announced 3 new products this month, none of them happen to be specifically for home theater, though the Sonos One SL is a much needed update to the position that the Play:1 filled, as the most common surround Sonos speaker for home theater. The Beam and Amp are fairly new to our product lineup, both of them with home theater capabilities. Over HDMI, those devices will tell the TV they're connected with that they want Dolby Digital 5.1, and if there's a Dolby Digital Plus signal, it'll automatically be converted.

As to what to read into with the Port, it's a much needed update to an older product that holds an important position in our lineup. It's for people with existing audio systems that they want to be able to bring the Sonos convenience to. It also has line-in, to bring new sources of audio into the Sonos speakers you have. It's about bringing Sonos to new places, to connect.



I'd love to see Sonos implement it in the Port and Amp, but they don't seem interested in doing so. Marketing reasons, I'm guessing, not technical. Or legal reasons (you idiots blew up my speakers!)I was disappointed when I found out that the Amp did not have Trueplay, and now here we are again. It's a killer feature that would make either of these products a must-have. As it stands, I see no reason to upgrade from my current streaming setup.
To be clear, the Amp does have Trueplay when you're using it with the in-wall or in-ceiling Sonos Architectural speakers we built with Sonance. To use Trueplay, we need to have the acoustic pattern of the speakers that are being tuned. These speakers have a signature that we're able to detect and tune to the room.


First of all; thank you for taking the time to respond to my post. Much appreciated.

Owning the Beam I can unfortunately not confirm that Dolby Digital Plus will automatically be converted to Dolby Digital. The Beam will request Dolby Digital and receive it if available. Streaming Netflix from Chromecast for instance will however give you stereo as no Dolby Digital track is available - only PCM and Dolby Digitial Plus.

With all these new products, including several for the home theater with HDMI, I and many others were hoping for some more modern codecs. As stated, I am however no longer expecting this to happen and fail to understand the reasoning behind this decision.

But at least now we can buy a third-party system with better sound format support for our living rooms and then add the Port on top of that to include the new system in our Sonos-setup.
Or, perhaps a better answer, no, there is no need to have a pre-amp in between the Port and a normal input on your amp. Just do not use the phono input.
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This also mean that any unsupported fileformats, such as DTS and DD Plus will be passed through.

That is completely different from a TV actually converting a received audio signal to DD. I have not seen a TV that can do this.

It doesn't matter that DD Plus supports supports DD - no Sonos products supports DD Plus. So when DD Plus is passed on by the TV to a Sonos-product, no sound will go through. The handshake feature will ensure that the Beam and AMP in this case receive a stereo-signal, which it supports.
This bit is incorrect. If the TV is sent DD+ and it's capable of outputting DD5.1 (as many are), it'll convert the DD+ over to DD5.1 to output. The TV won't take stereo and convert it into DD5.1, but it may have some upmix processing. The Sonos home theater devices will upmix stereo signals, so you will get audio out of the Sub and surrounds even if you're only sending it stereo audio.


The part about conversion is simply not true. And stereo upmixed to play on all speakers is nothing close to actual surround sound and not something anyone should ever pay for.

I have a fairly new LG Oled. It does indeed support both Dolby Digital Plus and Dolby Digital 5.1.

It will send Dolby Digital 5.1 from it's build-in apps.

It will pass on Dolby Digital 5.1 when received from my Apple TV (the Apple TV having converted any audio to Dolby Digital Plus).

But if my TV receives Dolby Digital Plus from any input, it will only pass on a stereo signal to the Beam. Because the Beam does not support Dolby Digital Plus. The same will happen for Dolby Atmos, DTS and any other format which is not either Dolby Digital or stereo.

No TVs I have come across are capable of converting audio. They can request and pass on various formats, but they will not convert it. Again, please show me a TV that can do this as this would save me and slot of other users in the forums a lot after hassle.

In any cases where an unsupported format is apparently being converted before being send to a Sonos produkt, this is likely being done by an external device; an Apple TV, Playstaion or similar.

However, and I understand that you avoid admitting to this in public, this does not change the fact that Sonos only supports one single, aging surround-sound format (Dolby Digital) and is fully depending on customers buying third-party devices and on such devices continuing supporting conversion to this almost obsolete format. A puclic secret that should be listed with capital letters on expensive systems being marketed for the home theater.

The problem is not the customers@ TVs. Or their Chromecasts. Or the bluray-players. The only reason we are having this discussion, is Sonos' extremely limited sound-support.

Most other major players in the industry have adopted a vast selection of formats, including Denon, Sony, LG, Yamaha, Samsung, B&O and the list goes on. I simply cannot understand Sonos' decision in this respect.

The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.

Why on earth does it matter? It plainly delivers sufficient power for what is manifestly an undemanding network appliance (it contains no power amplification). Are you contemplating replacing the PSU with a third party, unapproved, alternative? How would you assess whether the stock PSU was, or was not, up to scratch anyhow?
As the older Connects were "bit perfect" how is this going to produce a "richer sound" without messing up the sound?
Well, AFAIA the Connects weren't bit perfect any more, so maybe this one is...
With the Port they are telling us that if we want anything serious for surround, we should buy a good third-party amp and then splurge on the Port....
So, no change there, then...
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Well, it looks nice... I currently have two Connects, one married to the Arcam SonLink DAC (stacks perfectly under the Connect) which feeds my otherwise clunky Logitech 2.1 office speakers, the other Toslinks to a Cambridge Audio DacMagic then on to my Exposure amp etc. It took me ages and several different DAC choices to be happy with the sound of my main system (the Arcam started off there), since I never liked the DAC built into the Connect.

Lack of Toslink output has been criticised by others here, so I really hope my Connects never fail, or I may end up going through the whole DAC trial process all over again!

Does look nice though.
Too expensive for me. More than 400 euros to have my Home cinéma AMP connected to sonos is not cheap...
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@danjrichards

The Sonos Amp and The Port are not apples to apples although they do share a few similarities.

The Sonos Amp (IMO) is first used to power 3rd part speakers and just happens to accommodate a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player as examples. It can also be used in a HT setup to power 3rd party L/R front speakers and create a phantom center channel. Sonos speakers can be bonded to it as surrounds in a HT setup or you can use it to power 3rd party speakers as surrounds. It also has HDMI-ARC capability for connection to a compatible TV. Bottom-line the Sonos Amp is all about POWER.

The Port is designed to bring Sonos to an AVR via RCA input or send audio from a Turntable or CD player connected to an AVR via RCA output to other Sonos speakers. It can also act as a stand-alone component to a Turntable (with on-board or out board pre-amplification) or CD player to send audio to other Sonos speakers. Not to forget...you can connect 3rd party powered speakers via line-in to send Sonos audio to them. There are other unorthodox ways to use the Port as well. Just requires thinking outside the box (no pun intended).

I hope this helps. Cheers!
Year ago, forum member Majik linked to an experiment that sought to prove/disprove various audio tweaks/myths. Switched vs linear PSUs was one of those myths. The experiment consisted of recording the analog waveform of a system using the stock switched PSU, then recording with the linear PSU. The latter waveform was then reversed, and combined with the former. Thus everything alike between the two was cancelled out and the resulting waveform was the difference. The resulting "waveform" was inaudible, meaning any difference between the two was inaudible, even when isolated from the source.

In short, switched vs linear PSU is bunk (as is most audiophile pseudo-science).

So, how long until this one goes obsolete?  

 

Already answered above.

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The power cord now has a voltage regulator at the point where it plugs into the mains (2 prong in the US).Can you see if there are power specs noted on the voltage regulator? If so, would be much appreciated if you can post them here. Thanks.


@VeroGuy

Here ya go...these are USA

Output = 12v = 1A
Input = 100 -240V 50/60Hz 0.4A

Cheers!

We have always recommended Sonos Connects to our customers looking to replace old whole home audio systems. Now they are replaced with a port that has less functionality. Why is there no ability to use it as surround speakers?  No optical? No controls?  At $450 retail for a single zone pre-amp, it is really difficult sell.  

It’s hard understand how a $99 Symfonisk can act as a Sonos zone, amplifier and has a built in speaker, but a Port is just a zone controller at 4x the price.  It might be an idea to take apart a few Symfonisk speakers and take the audio from them to use with existing speakers/amps.

I usually don’t complain about companies and I have always been a fan of Sonos since the beginning, but I’m really starting to lose faith in the direction of your company. 
 

It seems that since you are a publicly traded company product turnover is most important you. 


Please go back to the Sonos that was once a group of guys passionate about creating great products. 

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